Author Topic: Russian souvenir medal for a religious foreign mission  (Read 1388 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Russian souvenir medal for a religious foreign mission
« on: June 29, 2012, 03:18:09 PM »
This medal belongs to a Dutch collecting friend. I suspect that it is a Russian or Bulgarian religious medal, but don't get beyond that. Can you help?

Peter
« Last Edit: June 29, 2012, 10:26:12 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline ciscoins

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Re: Russian or maybe Bulgarian religious medal?
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2012, 04:13:22 PM »
Соединим века, берега, народы
Uniting centuries, coasts, peoples

Митрополит Алексей с ... Дионисий XV в.
Metropolitan Alexey with ... Dionisiy, XV century

Международная культурная миссия "Истоки"
International cultural mission "Headwaters"

Благотворительное общество "Личность"
Benevolent society "Personality"


That was some Soviet mission that visited Turkey, Greece, France, Egypt, Italy, Israel, Malta and Cyprus in 1990. It was said at some internet auction that the medal was made (or obtained - ?) in Cairo, Egypt.
Ivan
Moscow, Russia

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Russian or maybe Bulgarian religious medal?
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2012, 05:25:36 PM »
Thank you, Ivan. I was at first surprised by a religious mission, but I suppose 1990 explains that. A souvenir medal, I suppose.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline ciscoins

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Re: Russian or maybe Bulgarian religious medal?
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2012, 10:04:28 PM »
Yes, 1990 explains everything. Ordinary people couldn't travel abroad until 1991. And foreign goods were very expensive in the USSR: one of our billionaires, Oleg Tinkoff, started his business (and bought his own apartment in Moscow) in 1991 when he, an ordinary student, brought just one bag with calculators from Singapore. Those calculators costed 7 dollars in Singapore and more than 70 dollars in Moscow. And he didn't even pay for the air tickets because he was sent there by some youth organization.

So I suppose that in 1990 some members of the Communist party, government or secret services wanted to visit some of the Western countries without paying anything for that. To buy something cheap there and to sell it for much higher prices here. But they had to organize some fictitious "benevolent societies" and "cultural missions" so as not to arouse suspicions.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2012, 12:17:39 AM by ciscoins »
Ivan
Moscow, Russia