Author Topic: Dragons on coins  (Read 17451 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dragons on coins
« Reply #15 on: July 10, 2012, 06:30:35 PM »
China, 5 cash Kiang-soo. Similar coins for other provinces.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline capnbirdseye

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Re: Dragons on coins
« Reply #16 on: July 10, 2012, 09:08:31 PM »
here's a classic one of mine from China,  Hsüan-t'ung, 10 cents 1911 Y#28
« Last Edit: July 10, 2012, 10:56:52 PM by capnbirdseye »
Vic

Offline Prosit

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Re: Dragons on coins
« Reply #17 on: July 10, 2012, 09:48:19 PM »
Indonesia has some Komodo coins....it is a dragon...at least by name.
Dale

Offline chrisild

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Re: Dragons on coins
« Reply #18 on: July 10, 2012, 10:44:53 PM »
But why would that keep us from posting images? ;D From Wikipedia:



Christian

Offline Prosit

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Re: Dragons on coins
« Reply #19 on: July 10, 2012, 10:55:22 PM »
Nice looking coin!  Many impressive dragons out there. More than I knew about.
I try not to post images of coins I don't have but like most of my rules I break it
at least 10-20 percent of the time.
Dale


But why would that keep us from posting images? ;D From Wikipedia:

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: Dragons on coins
« Reply #20 on: October 07, 2012, 04:48:34 PM »
Transnistria, 100 roubles, 2012.   Year of the dragon.

Offline <k>

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Re: Dragons on coins
« Reply #21 on: October 23, 2012, 07:36:15 PM »


British Virgin Islands , 25 dollars, 1978.  Griffin on the left, dragon on the right.

Offline <k>

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Re: Dragons on coins
« Reply #22 on: November 28, 2012, 07:46:48 PM »
UK, 1 pound, honouring Cardiff, the capital of Wales.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dragons on coins
« Reply #23 on: November 28, 2012, 09:42:18 PM »
Maybe someone should tell the designer of the Transnistrian thingy that the year of the dragon is an Asian thingy and his dragon is a European thingy. Asian dragons are snakes with chicken feet. European dragons are typically lizards.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Dragons on coins
« Reply #24 on: February 25, 2013, 06:49:48 PM »


A pattern UK decimal half penny of 1963, never issued. It was also designed by Christopher Ironside.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dragons on coins
« Reply #25 on: February 25, 2013, 11:20:46 PM »
Haven't thought about this before, but there is an interesting dichotomy between St George slaying a dragon and the dragon being Welsh. Maybe Georgie's dragon is green and bad and the Welsh dragon (which is not a classical dragon, more like a winged wolf) is red and good? Or does it just see red of anger? Bob knows...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Arminius

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Re: Dragons on coins
« Reply #26 on: February 25, 2013, 11:35:09 PM »


Japan, Mutsuhito (Meiji era) (1867-1912), dated Meiji year 4 = 1871 AD.,
20 Sen (24 mm / 4,97 g), type 1, .800 silver, mintage type 1+2: 4,313,015 ,
Obv.: Japanese symbols, around dragon in circle clutching pearl of celestial wisdom.
Rev.: Kiku Mon, rising sun in dotted circle, chrysanthemum and pawlonia wreath, pawlonia and chrysanthemum crests above.
KM Y3 ; JNDA: 01-20 .

 :)

Offline <k>

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Re: Dragons on coins
« Reply #27 on: February 26, 2013, 12:36:05 PM »
Haven't thought about this before, but there is an interesting dichotomy between St George slaying a dragon and the dragon being Welsh. Maybe Georgie's dragon is green and bad and the Welsh dragon (which is not a classical dragon, more like a winged wolf) is red and good? Or does it just see red of anger? Bob knows...

Peter

Interesting point. It's one of those things that I know (the Welsh dragon is red, others are green) but have never consciously dwelt on. I'll see if I can find out. I once asked a proud Welsh friend why the Welsh had adopted a far Eastern creature. He didn't answer, but just walked off in a huff.  ::)

From the internet:

The red Welsh dragon "Y Ddraig Goch" owes its origins to folklore and Arthurian legend. Originating from a serpent representing the Welsh God Dewi, Celtic King Arthur was said to have had a dream about a red dragon (symbolically representing Wales), which slayed a white dragon (which represented the Saxon invaders). In later times a crude red dragon design was adopted by Prince Llywelyn of Gwynedd in the 7th Century and taken into battle by Welsh hero Prince Owain Glyndwr, in conflicts with the invading English.

In later history, at the Battle of Bosworth, Welsh-born King Henry VII (Henry Tudor, crowned 1485) unfurled the red dragon, which he in turn had adopted as his own emblem. As such, the beloved red dragon has always represented the defiant Welsh nation, iconising Wales's unique cultural and historic heritage as a proud and ancient nation, which has long survived external threat. The Welsh dragon is often associated with the motto, "Y Ddraig Goch a ddyry Gychwyn" - or "The red dragon will show the way".

Offline chrisild

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Re: Dragons on coins
« Reply #28 on: February 26, 2013, 01:09:45 PM »
I once asked a proud Welsh friend why the Welsh had adopted a far Eastern creature.

What is surely interesting is that difference between "here" and "there". In Europe the dragon is usually the "bad guy" that gets killed by a hero/saint, while in Asia it has a positive connotation. Then again, the City of London (the central district so to say) has two dragons on its CoA, neither of which looks particularly dead to me.

From what I have read, the Welsh dragon is older than St. George's dragon, by the way. Used to be that St. Michael was the "dragon slayer", and it was only ;) about 1000 years ago that this role was "transferred" to St. George ...

Christian

Offline Prosit

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Re: Dragons on coins
« Reply #29 on: February 26, 2013, 06:14:22 PM »
Most of the coins I have seen with St Georg and Dragon have a pretty pitiful looking Dragon being trampled and speared to death. Doen't appear to be much of a challenge.  The Dragon should be big as a house...now that would take a hero  ;)

Dale




What is surely interesting is that difference between "here" and "there". In Europe the dragon is usually the "bad guy" that gets killed by a hero/saint, while in Asia it has a positive connotation. Then again, the City of London (the central district so to say) has two dragons on its CoA, neither of which looks particularly dead to me.

From what I have read, the Welsh dragon is older than St. George's dragon, by the way. Used to be that St. Michael was the "dragon slayer", and it was only ;) about 1000 years ago that this role was "transferred" to St. George ...

Christian