Ironbridge museum tokens

Started by bruce61813, April 05, 2007, 02:02:29 AM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

davidrj

Quote from: andyg on February 18, 2014, 08:37:17 PM
The Ironbridge and the Llechwedd tokens are both still in use - or at least they were last summer.
There is a set exchange rate - 1 penny = 40p?

Are they still using the same dates?

Anyone know what the "H"  signifies ?designer ?mint

Are there any other museums using this model?


:) David

malj1

We have another thread  Ironbridge museum tokens discussing these tokens where it is remarked  the 'H' mintmark of Heaton's Mint, Birmingham has been added to the design.

This suggests they were produced by The Birmingham Mint Ltd., which later became the IMI Birmingham Mint Ltd. in 1991.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

andyg

Quote from: davidrj on February 18, 2014, 09:58:16 PM
Are they still using the same dates?

Anyone know what the "H"  signifies ?designer ?mint

Are there any other museums using this model?


:) David

Not aware of any other dates for these tokens....
H is indeed for the Birmingham mint.
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

malj1

Blists Hill Victorian Town, originally called Blists Hill Open Air Museum, was opened in 1973.

The first building visitors see in the museum is the bank (modelled on the still-standing Lloyds Bank branch in Broseley), at which they can change modern coinage into token coinage that represents the predecimal farthings, halfpennies, pennies, threepenny bits and sixpences, at an exchange rate of 40 new pence to 1 old penny. They can then use the token coins as an alternative to modern currency for buying goods whilst visiting the museum (the gift shop at the museum entrance operates only in modern currency).

More here.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

malj1

Quote from: davidrj on February 18, 2014, 09:58:16 PM

Are there any other museums using this model?
:) David

I have added a few more pieces to this thread [Tokens used for payments] that have a similar purpose.

Folly Farm Adventure Park
Watermouth Castle Theme Park
Poldark Mine, Wendron, World Heritage Site
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

malj1

Spotted a set of coins from the Pentre Llechwedd village dated 1991 on eBay.  I wonder if this date has been issued separately?

a lousy image attached  ::)
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

malj1

Other than a farthing on numista these Pentre Llechwedd village tokens are hard to find.

The Vale of Ffestiniog site is interesting and mentions:

Walking through the Victorian Village you have an opportunity to convert currency, not to euros but back in time, with the prevailing rate of £2-40 to sixpence.  The sixpence goes a long way in Ffestin's sweet shop, with its shelves of glass jars filled with traditional boiled sweets, and can quench a thirst in the bar of the Miners Arms.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

malj1

Here is the farthing from the Pentref Llechwedd village dated 1991 which seems to be the only date seen. H mm, AE 20.9mm

I see with the set above the wallet is incorrectly marked Pentre instead of Pentref.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Figleaf

At the time I was there, they did not have their own tokens, but they did sell a pre-decimal set mounted in slate.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

davidrj

Quote from: Figleaf on May 24, 2014, 04:29:16 PM
At the time I was there, they did not have their own tokens, but they did sell a pre-decimal set mounted in slate.

Peter

I expect they were all sold 20+ years ago

only dates appear to be Llechwed 1991,  Ironbridge 1987, unless anyone has seen anything later

David

africancoins

Someone got me several of 2 or 3 denominations of the Ironbridge tokens - in a paper bank bag (the "bank" at the place) - several years ago.... real chance they are still in use. The Welsh set are not so common as the Ironbridge set.

Thanks Mr Paul Baker

malj1

It appears there is a new pair of dies for the Ironbridge Gorge Museum farthing  ...and maybe it will found for the other denominations?

9451a (new dies?) Britannia in outline only and large beads to rim. Left side - choppy sea with space at LHS. Right side - no sea and no "H".

Also there are three varieties of the original farthing as listed below:

9452a choppy sea
9453a flat sea with space at left. Obv. reins on horse belly
9454a flat sea
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

africancoins

A set of Penny, Halfpenny and Farthing that I got nearly 10 years ago are all without the "H" and have the "outline only" Britannia.

These new dies (including the removal of the mintmark) will be due to there being a different company making these tokens than previously.

Thanks Mr Paul Baker

bruce61813

Very interesting, trying to decide if I like the outline Britannia or not.

Bruce

malj1

#29
Quote from: malj1 on February 18, 2014, 10:37:00 PM
The first building visitors see in the museum is the bank (modelled on the still-standing Lloyds Bank branch in Broseley), at which they can change modern coinage into token coinage that represents the predecimal farthings, halfpennies, pennies, threepenny bits and sixpences, at an exchange rate of 40 new pence to 1 old penny....

I can confirm the existence of the Ironbridge Gorge sixpence denomination having now acquired one.

The "H" appears to have been removed as its not visible to the naked eye although a trace of it can be seen in the scan below the wreath to the left of the date so its issued after the new company took over from The Birmingham Mint. Maybe there is another to be found with the mintmark intact too?
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.