Author Topic: What is a Coin: Definition  (Read 5652 times)

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Offline Coinsforever

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Re: What is a Coin: Definition
« Reply #15 on: May 05, 2012, 01:07:16 AM »
I quote from memory something I read in the early 1980s that intrigued me at the time:

A coin has four values:

1] Its face value

2] Its intrinsic metal value

3] Its marketable numismatic value

4] Its sentimental value to the collector
e

I completely agree with above definitions.

In brief my view points are as follows :

We have to consider two factors :

1) Coins/paper money /shells/cowries etc  in terms of economic sense.
2) Coins/paper money/shells/cowries etc  in terms of hobby or numismatic or collectors perspective.

Mixing both the points are certainly  debatable , Peter's views  are stressing more on coins/money in  economic sense whereas Arthur point is from collector or Numismatic point of view.

a) For investors /economist or common individuals  coins must be carrying its face, intrinsic values.
b) For collectors coins must be carrying its numismatic value

But key point is that in both the cases "fake" , "forgery", "imitation" are definitely not acceptable.

In my personal opinion as said on several occasions here,  for me coin should be legal tender and issued for circulation.

Cheers ;D


Every experience, good or bad, is a priceless collector's item.



http://knowledge-numismatics.blogspot.in/

paisepagal

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Re: What is a Coin: Definition
« Reply #16 on: May 05, 2012, 06:34:33 AM »
Question is as a numismatist what I shaould collect and what I should not. For answering this question this thread is really worth to note.

Islam, I'd add another perspective to this discussion. As a collector, what is or is not a coin should not be of much consequence... You collect it for the fun of the chase and to a certain degree, to learn a bit of history and culture....no one can tell you what is worth collecting.

as a numismat, you would focus on a particular area of study (assuming you don't want to be a jack of all trades, master of none ;))... If you are concerned, for instance with, British India coins 1835-1947, you wouldn't have to deal with modern proof issues, fantasy coins etc. you'd only have to know how to distinguish proof restrikes and outright forgeries. What's more, a numismat does not need to have a personal collection....only a body of study, which the Internet, photos, visits to museums and catch ups with other numismats more than serve the purpose.

So to get back to your question, there is no reason why being a numismat should be inextricably tied to your personal collection. As I grow older, I would like to focus increasingly on the numismatic research front rather than expending ever higher volumes of income on a personal collection which in the end are simply pieces of mostly round metallic objects.

Offline Md. Shariful Islam

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Re: What is a Coin: Definition
« Reply #17 on: May 05, 2012, 06:46:44 AM »
If I am not wrong, the original question of Zoppo was to define coin. We mixed it with collection issue. defining coin is important. Why? Say I collect tokens only. They look like coins. Should I call myself a numismatist or coin collector or what?

That is what I understand. Sorry if I have failed to get the sense.

Islam

paisepagal

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Re: What is a Coin: Definition
« Reply #18 on: May 05, 2012, 07:02:18 AM »
If I am not wrong, the original question of Zoppo was to define coin. We mixed it with collection issue. defining coin is important. Why? Say I collect tokens only. They look like coins. Should I call myself a numismatist or coin collector or what?

That is what I understand. Sorry if I have failed to get the sense.

Islam

If you notice my first sentence, Ive attempted to add another dimension   ;)
If you want to call yourself a numismat or collector, do you study a coin and learn as much about it as you can ? In terms of coin specification, market rarity, historical background etc etc... Or do you simply admire your coin because it looks nice and then you chuck it in the draw to admire it once in a while

Its not rocket science  ;D


Offline Figleaf

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Re: What is a Coin: Definition
« Reply #19 on: May 05, 2012, 10:16:14 AM »
Paise, I think your point is excellent, but it refers to coin collecting. I see the connection between coins and coin collecting, of course, but the questions are slightly different (subject and object of the collection), which is no reason not to discuss it, though. Topic drift has never been a problem here.

I am interested in your self-observation that, as you grow older, you want to study more and collect less, since that is exactly the path I have taken and I suspect we are not the only ones. Should that not mean that we should be very tolerant indeed versus the young graders, as they may, with age, very well turn into exactly the sort of numismatists the hobby needs to prosper? What do you think?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

akona20

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Re: What is a Coin: Definition
« Reply #20 on: May 05, 2012, 02:18:52 PM »
Very interesting replies and it has given me food for thought in more ways than one.

I sought comments on this thread because of the debate about the possibility of a Sikh coin being offered for auction being a fake. I was rather unclear of something and sought advice or direction. It was a PM from asm that made me see somewhat more clearly a number of what perhaps some see as minor issues but in fact they are major issues and need addressing and reviewing at a serious level.