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Jaipur Nazarana coins?

Started by Rangnath, April 03, 2008, 04:41:13 PM

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Rangnath

#15
Oesho,thanks for writing about that transition, from "Princely" state to statehood in the Inidan Republic.  I have to admit to once thinking of it as a all or nothing event, but no more.  That is one of the attributes of numismatics. Coins allow us to see history in detail and your newly posted images support this beautifully.
richie

BC Numismatics

Jan,
  Those are very nice Jaipuri Nazarana coin photos that you have posted up.

Jaipur was united with the Dominion of India,not the Republic of India (which was declared on the 26th. of January 1950 by the second (& last) Governor-General of the Dominion of India,Chakravarthi Rajagopalachari).

Aidan.


Oesho

QuoteDid you know that Maharajah Sawai Man Singh II died while playing polo?
Yes, I knew.

QuoteJaipur was united with the Dominion of India,not the Republic of India (which was declared on the 26th. of January 1950 by the second (& last) Governor-General of the Dominion of India,Chakravarthi Rajagopalachari).
Jaipur merged into the Greater Rajasthan Union, which itself became a part of the Dominion of India. This lasted till the 26th January 1950. Jaipur didn't independently merged into the Dominion of India, but as part of a greater union only.

Figleaf

The later Jaipur pieces are not too difficult to find in good conditions; nevertheless, these are prize pieces! To drool for.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

shariqkhan

In continuation with this topic I want your attention of Paisa of Sawai Mansingh at http://coincollectorsofindore.blogspot.com/

The hammer impact is clearly visible on this coin.

Oesho

#20
The later 19th century and 20th century nazarana coinage of Jaipur was not struck by hammer and anvil, but on a screw press or machinery without collar. This can be observed by the equal impression of the legend on both sides of the coins. By hand hammered/struck coins there are always weak parts or uneven thickness, because the dies were not exactly in one line. Also the dump coinage in the name of Sawai Man Singh II seems to have been produced that way (perhaps the brass 2 annas 1942/Yr.21 are excepted).
Your coin, the 1/4 anna brass AD1943 (Y#18), seems to have been recovered from under a bullock-cart. The piece was originally produced on a screw press or a machinery without collar. The only milled coins struck in collar are the 1/4 anna brass and copper pieces 1944 with the rulers portrait. Of these coins also proof specimen are known.

shariqkhan

Thanks a Lot for this detail information.

Rangnath

#22
Yes indeed! Thanks Oesho. 
Looking at the four images that you recently posted gave me a lot of pleasure.  What a difference it is to look at these images rather than referring to what is in the catalogs! Thanks for including them in this discussion.
richie

BC Numismatics

Quote from: shariqkhan on October 26, 2008, 06:25:05 AM
In continuation with this topic I want your attention of Paisa of Sawai Mansingh at http://coincollectorsofindore.blogspot.com/

The hammer impact is clearly visible on this coin.

Shariq,
  Your coin was issued during the reign of both Maharajah Sawai Man Singh II & King George VI,not King George V.

Aidan.

shariqkhan

Thanks Oesho
Very Nice Coins and Pictures indeed.

Figleaf

#25
One more thing I appreciate about such images is knowing that Oesho still buys coins. The silent message of these coins is that by being patient and looking in the right places, you can buy top coins and they are probably not even much more expensive than the worn copies you see every da. Now that's something to think about.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

shariqkhan

It is more surprising for me because now a  days it is very difficult to find coins in good condition in India at good prices. Although the coin mentioned by me was purchased 15 years back. 

Oesho

The inscriptions on the coins and medal illustrated with Reply #20 are as follows:
1) brass one anna 1943
Obv.: (Devanagari) Maharaja dhi-raj sawai man singh 2 - 1943.
Rev.: Zarb sawai jaipur, ba-ahdi shah-in-shah sultanat inglistan george shesham, below 1 Eek anna in Persian and Devanagari.
2) brass one anna 1944
Obv.: Buste of the Maharaja to r., around it legend in Devanagari as on above coin (starting at 1 o'clock)
Rev.: Inscription as on above coin, but date 19 - 44 added.
3) Inscription as on the nazarana coins, date 194(2)/Ry.21. No value is given on the coin.
4) Silver Jubilee medal
Obv.: Buste of the Maharaja to r., with legend in Devanagari around: Maharaja dhi-raj shri Sawai Man Singh 2
Rev.: Rajat jayanti ashwin krishna 12 san. 2004 (Silver Jubilee Ashwin Krishna 12 Samvat 2004)
diameter: 38 mm.

Rangnath

I often make it a habit when entering an Art Gallery or Art Museum to choose one (Rembrandt or Vermeer?) from all which are hung in the room for personal acquisition; I make the assumption that I have the money and opportunity to acquire what pleases me. 

Of the four that Oesho recently posted and playing the same game (and  forgetting  about the intrinsic value of gold or the numismatic value of the coin), I would choose the one anna 1944 coin.  I love the mathematical precision and flow of calligraphy and symbol.  The absence of a border or rim in this machine made coin adds to its beauty.  That's my choice  ;D, what's yours?
richie

Figleaf

No problem. Ever the collector, I'd go for the medal, because that's the one I don't have. Ever the gatherer, I don't mind my copies are not as good looking. ;)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.