Author Topic: Greek and Hebrew alphabet references  (Read 4079 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline redwine

  • liaison officer
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3 372
  • Too old to care.
Greek and Hebrew alphabet references
« on: April 17, 2012, 07:44:47 PM »
Sorry  ;)
Perhaps we could add the Greek alphabet somehow??
« Last Edit: April 18, 2012, 12:58:21 AM by Figleaf »
Always willing to trade.  See my profile for areas of interest.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31 505
Re: Greek and Hebrew alphabet references
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2012, 09:04:46 PM »
Yessir. :)
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline redwine

  • liaison officer
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3 372
  • Too old to care.
Re: Greek and Hebrew alphabet references
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2012, 09:07:09 PM »
How do I copy and paste them thar letters? :D
Always willing to trade.  See my profile for areas of interest.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31 505
Re: Greek and Hebrew alphabet references
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2012, 10:08:44 PM »
Unless you have really advanced OCR software, ya can't, matey.

You can click on the paperclip below the scan to get the page on your hard disk ... or if you need individual letters, you can copy/paste them from Wikipedia.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

translateltd

  • Guest
Re: Greek and Hebrew alphabet references
« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2012, 01:04:52 AM »
Most Greek/Hebrew/Arabic and interestingly accented Latin letters are available in Word - look for Insert > Symbol and start scrolling down the list.

Offline redwine

  • liaison officer
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3 372
  • Too old to care.
Re: Greek and Hebrew alphabet references
« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2012, 08:56:58 AM »
αβγδεζηθικλμνξοπρςστυφχψω

Sorry, I was being lazy :o
Always willing to trade.  See my profile for areas of interest.

Offline chrisild

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8 760
  • NW · DE · EU
Re: Greek and Hebrew alphabet references
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2012, 12:49:35 PM »
I use something called PopChar, on the Mac (Snow Leopard) and the netbook (Windows XP). Not free but quite useful for me. You can even search for descriptions - type "tilde", for example, and you get a list of matching characters ...

Christian

Offline FosseWay

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3 449
  • Göteborg, Sverige
Re: Greek and Hebrew alphabet references
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2012, 02:38:11 PM »
I used to use PopChar as well, but these days I don't think it's necessary. I just use the character viewer (default location is top right next to the time and (on laptops) battery life indicator, same menu as for switching between keyboard settings). For most mainstream applications in most standard fonts, most of the options in the character viewer simply appear by double-clicking them, and there is a huge range of different alphabets, more or less every known accented Latin character, IPA, fractions, you name it. However, some fonts are limited in their scope and some applications don't really support the viewer at all (QuarkXPress in particular, for which you need to purchase the extended font families at inflated expense).

Regardless of how you're importing text, doing it one character at a time can get a trifle tedious if you're trying to type an extended passage in a different alphabet. To get round this in Cyrillic and related alphabets used in the former USSR, I use translit.ru, where you can type in Latin and it appears on screen in Cyrillic. One thing to be aware of: it doesn't accept keyboard shortcuts for things like cut and paste. If you hit ctrl+C or apple+C you will wipe what you just wrote. Use the mouse and right-click to copy and paste. It also gets a trifle confused if you use it with a keyboard setting other than English (it doesn't really know what to do with the letters Å, Ä and Ö, for example).

I would imagine similar tools exist for Greek and other alphabets.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31 505
Re: Greek and Hebrew alphabet references
« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2012, 02:57:55 PM »
Just Google "virtual greek keyboard" or "virtual japanese keyboard" etc. Good for situations where you know the language and have longer texts. For short texts and individual words, Google translate will do an acceptable job.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.