Author Topic: UK local transportation tokens  (Read 105396 times)

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Offline agoodall

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #405 on: May 26, 2021, 08:07:50 PM »
...and the obverse!

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #406 on: May 26, 2021, 09:16:48 PM »
Can I use your pics in WoT?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline agoodall

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #407 on: May 27, 2021, 12:16:33 AM »
Yes, no problem!

Andrew

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #408 on: May 30, 2021, 07:26:28 AM »
Here is another trade token not used as a ticket but referring to paid transport. The issuer was William Waterhouse (the W.W. at six o'clock below the swan), owner of the post house "The swan with two necks" on Lad Lane in London. The word neck is a corruption of nick, as swans with two nicks in the beak were royal property. Swans were highly appreciated food. Other swan-owners made different markings.

As a post house, the swan with two necks had two businesses: selling food and lodging, like any inn, and selling mail coach tickets, in its case on the line from London to Weymouth. Withers (1999) quotes a contemporary ad giving the price of travel from Exeter to the swan with two necks as 4 guineas inside and 2 guineas on the outside of the coach - tellingly, the reverse shows only an inside passenger. Outside passengers would sit on the roof. Luggage would be extra. The token being a halfpence, it is clear that it would not have been used like a ticket, but rather for the food and drink selling side of the enterprise.

The business must have been rewarding. The token is detailed and well made. The engraver is said to be Thomas Halliday, a top of the market artisan.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline agoodall

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #409 on: November 16, 2021, 02:37:11 PM »
I've come across another decimal transport tokens that isn't listed in WoT:

It is a West Berkshire £1, expiry date 30/06/2008.

Diameter: 26mm
Weight: 0.95 gram

Andrew

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #410 on: November 16, 2021, 05:42:10 PM »
Listed now.

 :rock:

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.