Author Topic: UK local transportation tokens  (Read 89246 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #270 on: July 20, 2014, 12:50:15 PM »
The Derby tramways operated 1904-1934.

The tokens in this post are from the collection of malj1. The other side is blank. The brass three-halfpence is 26mm (R5) = 50 to 120 known. Smith 240AB

Malcolm & Peter
« Last Edit: July 20, 2014, 02:13:14 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #271 on: July 20, 2014, 12:50:48 PM »
The holes are part of the design, not a cancellation. The other side is blank. The round tuppence has nice signs of brockage. For decimal tokens, see this post.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 20, 2014, 03:10:29 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #272 on: July 20, 2014, 12:51:25 PM »
The aluminium three halfpence are from Malcolm's collection. The size of the denomination on the Derby aluminium halfpence is different. My two can be see together for comparison. first @ 23.9mm second @ 24.2mm

The pink plastic three-halfpenny token was issued for use during WW2. Both sides are the same. It's actually a much darker pink, but my scanner has great problems with this shade.

Malcolm & Peter
« Last Edit: July 21, 2014, 12:32:54 AM by malj1 »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #273 on: July 20, 2014, 01:38:43 PM »
Derby Omnibus education and employee tokens.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 20, 2014, 02:27:06 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Kushi

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #274 on: July 20, 2014, 11:17:19 PM »
I recently obtained the following seven tokens that should be added to the WoC UK local transportation tokens index.

Cotswold District Council, 40p, pale green, round, consimilar.
Eastleigh Borough Council, GBP 1, pale violet, round, expiry 31-08-06.
North Avon Disrict Council, 50p, orange, heptagonal, letter N stencil-cut.
Stroud District Council, 50p, orange, heptagonal, letter S stencil-cut.
West Berkshire, 25p, yellow, round, letters WB stencil cut, valid 2009-10.
West Berkshire, 25p, violet, round, letters WB stencil cut, valid 2010-11.
West Berkshire, GBP 1, pale green, round, letters WB stencil cut, valid 2011-12.

Sadly, I'm not proficient at scanning or photographing plastic tokens.


« Last Edit: July 21, 2014, 08:48:41 AM by Kushi »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #275 on: September 07, 2014, 06:49:32 PM »
The old arms of Rotherham county borough are a complicated affair. It is not clear where the cannon are coming from. The three deer are a reference to the Arms of the Archbishops of Rotherham. The bridge represents the ancient bridge at Rotherham. It also refers to the Old Southwark Bridge, built by Rotherham iromasters, and the Bailey bridge, invented by a Rotherham man. Mercury's staff with the odd hand on top symbolises commerce. For the tokens with post-1947 arms, see here.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #276 on: September 08, 2014, 01:53:30 AM »
the cannon refer to the iron works located in around Rotherham, especially that of Samuel and Aaron Walker.

A large foundry was erected at the Holmes, in which they made almost all kinds of castings, and by 1757, thanks to a contract obtained by Charles Watson-Wentworth, Marquis of Rockingham, large quantities of cannon were being produced for the American War of Independence; mills worked by water wheels, for the turning and boring cannon; forges and mills, not only at the Holmes, but at Thrybergh and Conisbrough.


Walker Cannon

 Source for much more detail on this.


Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #277 on: September 09, 2014, 04:44:03 PM »
Note the word TRANSPORT. For the Tramways series of South Shields and the arms, see this post.

Peter
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #278 on: September 09, 2014, 07:15:01 PM »
Stockton-on-Tees is a shipbuilding town. That probably explains the no-nonsense look of this token, that - following local usage - dispenses with the Tees. The C in corporation sticks out a little below the baseline. El-cheapo designer, Stockton? ;)

Peter
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Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #279 on: September 17, 2014, 06:11:41 AM »
An unlisted BUS PASS for the N.C.B. NORTH DERBYS AREA

NV,yellow plastic 31.7mm

Two other N.C.B. types are listed for Waleswood motor bus # Sheffield 685 BD/BE and BH

Another possibility is the Chesterfield issue # 170 CA thru CD for Flint Glap See North Derbyshire Collieries [almost halfway down page]


Copyright and Owner Mark Smith.

FLINT GLAP - Orange plastic, same design both sides. These tokens were used by miners in the Bolsover travelling to Glapwell Colliery on the private miners' bus service run by Mrs. E Flint of Carr Vale. Certainly in use in 1967 but withdrawn from use c.1970. ...The Smiths cat., says this bus was run by Mrs Flint for the N.C.B.

Also shown there and mentioned:

White Plastic Glapwell Colliery Checks - These are similar to many other plastic checks I have from the North Derbyshire area. But how were they used?

I feel this could well be a bus pass too.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2014, 06:30:54 AM by malj1 »
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #280 on: September 17, 2014, 11:16:37 AM »
No doubt about the North Derbyshire bus pass. Very nice find!

No doubt either on the Flint Glap token. The explanation given is convincing. The Derbyshire Miners Association piece is pretty likely a bus token (could be a co-op restaurant token, but I don't see miners coming up just for lunch.)

I do have doubts on the Thorne and the five remaining Glapwell tokens. In their favour, the layout resembles that of the North Derbyshire token. However, there is no mention of transport or NCB or another Miners' union, but the mine is mentioned. It is quite possible that they were identity tags issued by the mine administration (hence the name of the mine) as a crude but effective way to keep track of who was in the mine. The miner would, depending on how the administration wanted the system to operate, either take them upon entry and give them back when leaving the mine or he would yield them on entry and take it back on leaving. Fire brigades had a similar system to keep track of who was in a burning building.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #281 on: September 17, 2014, 11:52:10 AM »
Most of the others in the image are mining pieces and only included as I had just uploaded the entire image from that link to show the Flint Glap token which I have been seeking for years; but the white Glapwell Colliery is one I think could well be another bus pass although it does not say so explicitly.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #282 on: September 17, 2014, 02:10:16 PM »
The similarity between the white plastic Glapwell token and the round brass Glapwell token leads me to believe that the two have the same function.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline africancoins

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #283 on: September 17, 2014, 08:47:50 PM »
The brass "COLLIERY" pieces with a stamped number (and hole) were for uses within the colliery.... mainly for checking in and out of the working area. Each miner had pieces with a different stamped number...

Thanks Mr Paul Baker

Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #284 on: September 27, 2014, 02:46:02 PM »
I have shown the 1d Fibre Sheffield Transport Department token before, but here it is again alongside two varieties of the Sheffield Corporation Tramways 1d that are also in Fibre



The first is a dark grey possible due to age or wear but on the second pale grey piece the halfpenny on the reverse has a distinctly different half, especially seen in the figure 1
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.