Author Topic: UK local transportation tokens  (Read 88107 times)

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Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #105 on: February 18, 2013, 10:22:15 PM »
Halfpenny fare says very early. Probably pre-WW1. another in the same style was for military use. 

Aberdeen Corporation Tramways Opened 27 August 1898 closed 1958
Aberdeen Suburban Tramways Opened 23 June 1904 Closed    9 June 1927
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Offline africancoins

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #106 on: February 19, 2013, 12:11:11 AM »
Material....  the really old looking "plastic" tokens in this series are celluloid or something rather similar... More recently pieces are a more modern plastic... maybe there is another plastic material inbetween....

For plastic pieces there are two possible methods of manufacture... something like... older pieces.. "hot-melt" where the material is pressed into with something hot from each side.... Then the pieces from 1970's onward (perhaps a little earlier too) are injection moulded and will have a pip on the edge...  There could always be another method used at some stage during the 20th century. Not too certain on all of this.

As for fibre.... The last piece shown in reply 85 of this topic could well be the only fibre piece in this topic. Very few British transport pieces are made of this. I think there are also a few co-op tokens made from fibre. It may be easier to find a fibre U.S. Sales Tax token - that series includes plastic, metal and fibre pieces.

Thanks Mr Paul Baker

Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #107 on: February 22, 2013, 11:07:25 AM »
Celluloid dates from about 1885 and until the early 1920s was one of the commonest plastics around. After this, up to the time of WW2, transport tokens were made using a cheaper alternative of cellulose acetate which is a development of the earlier Celluloid. As Paul said the injection moulded type came in later; I would suggest late fifties early sixties.

By the 1940s plastics were found in almost every home especially in electrical equipment and fittings but if you take a look at the Plastics Historical Society page you can see tons of plastics stuff.

A very early fibre token is this grey one from Sheffield. Another in black fibre may be seen here. this has a very distinctive shape for use by the vision impaired.

Penny red added.
« Last Edit: November 16, 2013, 05:33:39 PM by Figleaf »
Malcolm
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Offline orsk2

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #108 on: February 25, 2013, 07:00:30 PM »
Tell us about these tokens?
In what years they were used?
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Offline FosseWay

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #109 on: February 25, 2013, 07:05:16 PM »
The first two are denominated in decimal pence, so after 1971, but probably not for very long after (especially in the case of the 1p) -- so probably 1971-late 70s.

The other three are denominated in old pence, so before 1971, but more specific I am unable to be.

Offline orsk2

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #110 on: February 25, 2013, 07:07:55 PM »
Tokens.
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Offline orsk2

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #111 on: February 25, 2013, 07:11:03 PM »
The first two are denominated in decimal pence, so after 1971, but probably not for very long after (especially in the case of the 1p) -- so probably 1971-late 70s.

The other three are denominated in old pence, so before 1971, but more specific I am unable to be.
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Offline orsk2

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #112 on: February 27, 2013, 05:43:02 PM »
Who can add information?
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Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #113 on: March 03, 2013, 11:16:53 AM »
Who can add information?

For the Kingston Upon Hull Corporation Transport see 'The Official History Of Kingston Upon Hull City Transport' A Brief History. which in fact is a huge history.  ;D

I did not find the actual tokens but a skimmed over a bit so may have missed these. I did find he has used dew i/o due about twenty times which is rather irritating.

It seems the Kingston Upon Hull Corporation Transport name change to Kingston Upon Hull City Transport was made in 1972 so the two decimal pieces you show would have become obsolete the year after they were introduced. The coat of arms on the tokens were modified at one stage, I am guessing it may have been in the 1930's however a thorough read of the article may reveal when this change occurred; Your pieces are of this latter design.
Malcolm
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Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #114 on: March 03, 2013, 11:36:43 AM »
Morecambe & Heysham Corporation
 The history of the council owned public transport operation in Morecambe & Heysham that can trace its origins to the Morecambe Tramways Company that began operating in 1887. The story is told right through to the amalgamation with Lancaster's bus operation in 1974

October 1928 saw the amalgamation of Heysham Urban District Council with the Borough of Morecambe to create the new Morecambe & Heysham Corporation.

The Morecambe & Heysham Corporation depot passed to the control of Lancaster City Council from April 1st, 1974.
Malcolm
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Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #115 on: March 03, 2013, 11:58:17 AM »
 Wallasey Corporation Motor Buses.

Wallasey Council/Corporation Tramways existed between 1902 and 1933 when they were superceded by Wallasey Corporation Motor Buses. Major Robert Roughley Greene was general manager from inception to 1923.

The trams were built by Brush & Co of Loughborough and when, at inception a representative of Brush & Co enquired of a representative of Wallasey Council what colour the trams should be painted, the answer came, "see Greene". Taken literally, the Brush & Co rep. reported back that the trams were to be painted sea green. The trams were indeed painted a "muddy" green & cream.

On the 1st December 1969, the 75 buses of Wallasey Corporation were merged with the neighbouring fleets of Birkenhead and Liverpool Corporations to form the Merseyside Passenger Transport Executive, bringing to an end almost 70 years of independent municipal operations in the borough of Wallasey.

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Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #116 on: March 03, 2013, 12:11:08 PM »
Wolverhampton Corporation Transport Department.

This name appears to date from the late 1920's through to 1969 when the corporation transport department closed and the routes and vehicles were taken over by the West Midlands Passenger Transport Executive along with the fleets of Walsall, West Bromwich and Birmingham, though in effect the PTE was just an enlarged Birmingham City Transport under a different name.

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Malcolm
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Offline malj1

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #117 on: March 03, 2013, 12:19:38 PM »
Southport Corporation Transport 1900-1974

31st December 1934, the last tram ran in Southport [Southport Tramways Company] so around this date I surmise the name changed to Southport Transport. On the 1st April 1974, the transport undertakings of these two municipal operators were absorbed into the Merseyside PTE, and at midnight on the 31st March 1974, Southport Corporation Transport passed into history and almost 75 years of locally controlled municipal services ended.

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Offline orsk2

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #118 on: March 03, 2013, 02:28:40 PM »
Thank you very much malj1!
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: UK local transportation tokens
« Reply #119 on: March 30, 2013, 03:15:55 PM »
Matlock is centrally located in the centre of England. ;) It is built on hills, making motorised transportation popular. From July 1971 to March 1974, the Matlock Urban District Council issued 6 rectangular tokens. Happy to say I got some of them. They are 38 x 25 mm.

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