Author Topic: Troubled coins  (Read 15281 times)

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Offline FosseWay

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Re: Troubled coins
« Reply #105 on: January 02, 2020, 10:02:03 AM »
Surely, the four leafed clover is regarded as a Good Luck symbol and is not specifically Irish.

The shamrock need not have 4 leaves; indeed it generally has three, as shown on the two lower images in Bruce's post before yours. The first, with four leaves, looks "odd" in my eyes.

Offline malj1

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Re: Troubled coins
« Reply #106 on: January 02, 2020, 10:52:51 AM »
Here is a four leaf clover. I see them from time to time in my garden. this was taken years ago with a Nokia phone I had at the time.
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Offline brandm24

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Re: Troubled coins
« Reply #107 on: January 02, 2020, 02:21:35 PM »
For some time I was uncertain if there was a political meaning to clover leaf images on coins. I'd earlier seen others that I didn't get for my collection because of this uncertainty, but after hearing from several sources that this was the case I came around to believe it. The Irish coin with both the image and IRA were the final confirmation for me.

I also have an example stamped 1916 with a clover leaf underneath it. More proof in my mind that it was used as a Nationalist symbol.

Bruce
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Offline FosseWay

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Re: Troubled coins
« Reply #108 on: January 02, 2020, 03:02:28 PM »
The first series of UK £1 coins portrayed the national heraldic plants of the constituent countries - thistle, leek, oak tree and... flax. The shamrock is the most obvious floral emblem of Ireland, but yet it wasn't chosen. I imagine this was because the shamrock was seen as being too associated with Irish nationalism, whereas the flax plant connotes one of the principal historic industries of the part of Ireland that is now part of the UK, and as such has less sectarian baggage.

Offline brandm24

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Re: Troubled coins
« Reply #109 on: January 02, 2020, 07:38:17 PM »
The first series of UK £1 coins portrayed the national heraldic plants of the constituent countries - thistle, leek, oak tree and... flax. The shamrock is the most obvious floral emblem of Ireland, but yet it wasn't chosen. I imagine this was because the shamrock was seen as being too associated with Irish nationalism, whereas the flax plant connotes one of the principal historic industries of the part of Ireland that is now part of the UK, and as such has less sectarian baggage.
Your assumption seems logical concerning the non use of the shamrock. One thing that threw me off for a long time was the same non use by the IRA or other Nationalist entities on their banners, flags, posters or other "advertising,"  except for the coins. The examples on various forms of currency aren't common, so perhaps they were squeamish about its use for whatever reason. I should investigate this further and see if I can determine the reason or reasons why.

Bruce
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Offline <k>

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Re: Troubled coins
« Reply #110 on: January 02, 2020, 07:55:28 PM »
Shamrocks, like leprechauns, are associated with "Oirishry" - embarrassing clichéd stuff. For the Netherlands, clogs would be a similar cliché.

See: Ireland: decimal variations - the shamrock designs were rejected.