Author Topic: Troubled coins  (Read 11935 times)

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Offline EWC

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Re: Troubled coins
« Reply #45 on: April 14, 2019, 11:30:36 AM »
The coin could us a good cleaning as you say, but I very rarely clean counterstamped coins...particularly these modern ones. The grit, grime, stains, and toning found on many of the Troubles pieces help me authenticate them. Though it would seem nearly impossible to determine a fake from a legitimate example. it really isn't. There are many, many red flags to look for, most all of them subtle but still there to tell a tale. The surface  condition is a very important one.

Yes - completely agree - (I thought that myself - but kept quiet).

The green staining on the salmon piece is the sort of thing you might get on a piece specifically put aside in an old leather purse or some such - and that itself is an integral part of it's history

Rob T

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Troubled coins
« Reply #46 on: April 14, 2019, 11:33:39 AM »
I see your point. I wonder if there are many imitations, though. The silence of the members here says something. Not getting any comments from others is a further indication. Sure, these pieces are rare, not even scarce. However, demand approaches zero. It's that way with tokens also.

Furthermore, there are ways to produce any kind and colour of patina. The mere fact that there's green stuff on top of a coin means nothing by itself. However, the wrong green stuff on a bronze or copper piece may destroy the coin - and it's contagious.

Nevertheless, you are the final arbiter of what you do with your coins. You should just take your decisions with all the relevant facts in mind.

As for the 8, if memory serves (pfft!), the Orange marches were organised in sections, e.g. section 8, the dark looking radicals, would get ready to start marching right after section 7, the hoompah band with the stout fellow carrying the giant drum, but before section 9, the battle re-enacters. ;)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline brandm24

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Re: Troubled coins
« Reply #47 on: April 14, 2019, 03:36:06 PM »
As you say, Rob, the method of storage is critical in how any coin will survive. I've always associated "green slime" with long exposure to plasticized coin flips or other less obvious environmental contaminants. Non-archival paper envelopes seem to leave dull gray unattractive coloring on silver and copper-nickel coins. As real estate agents say the most important three factors in selecting a home are location...location...location. Not strictly true of course, but in coin storage it is.

Thanks for your comments.

Bruce
Bruce

Offline brandm24

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Re: Troubled coins
« Reply #48 on: April 14, 2019, 04:14:53 PM »
You're right of course, Peter, in saying that toning and surface characteristics can be replicated. However, by carefully examining a coin and knowing what to look for (depth of color, patterns of toning, and of course the overall "look") a lot of AT can be detected. The SF and 1690 examples don't fall into the AT category though as they're more damaged than toned.

In collecting these Troubles counterstamps I have some distinct advantages. Until a few years ago I saw few if any fake pieces. The market was...and still is... very thin for them, and it wasn't unusual for me to pick up an example for a dollar or two. As a matter of fact, the postage fee more often than not exceeded the cost of the coin.

That's changed in the past few years, unfortunately.The hoax was perpetuated by just a few dishonest sellers, who now seem to have shifted their attention to pushing fake "Votes For Women" counterstamps...and asking strong money for them. At any given moment there's at least 12 or 15 coins appearing in eBay auctions. IMO, they're all fakes. I wouldn't mind adding a legitimate example to my own collection, but don't even trust myself to select an authentic one. I just stay away from them.

Thanks for weighing in on the possible reason for the "8" stamped on the Penny. Your guess is as good as mine...actually better than mine as I don't have one. Cheers!

Bruce
Bruce