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Third Reich Coins

Started by Mackie, March 26, 2012, 09:20:54 PM

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Mackie

Quote from: The Oracle on March 26, 2012, 05:37:10 PM
you give me your avatar coin and i will give you the airforce coin

TO,

I have a nice collection of Nazi Swastika coins but unfortunately I just have one 5 reichsmark and 2 reichsmark silver coin otherwise I would have given you one gladly.  :P
Warm Regards,
Mackie

The Oracle

Quote from: Mackie on March 26, 2012, 09:20:54 PM
TO,

I have a nice collection of Nazi Swastika coins but unfortunately I just have one 5 reichsmark and 2 reichsmark silver coin otherwise I would have given you one gladly.  :P

anywhere you have posted your collection?

Mackie

Unfortunately, so far I have not but since someone has started it as an individual thread I can post here. The problem is such coins lose its charm and detailing when scanned and I still dont have a DSLR to click them.
Warm Regards,
Mackie

Mackie

#3
Thanks, Aditya for moving this topic to the right section and starting it as a separate topic. Appreciated!!  :D
Warm Regards,
Mackie

Figleaf

Wikipedia puts it this way: At the start of the Third Reich in 1933 there was a ceremonial handshake between President Paul von Hindenburg and the new Chancellor Adolf Hitler on 21 March 1933 in Potsdam's Garrison Church in what became known as the "Day of Potsdam". This symbolised a coalition of the military (Reichswehr) and Nazism.

The small coins (1-2-5-10 pfennig) didn't change much in the early years of nazism. Between 1933 and 1936, the 1 Mark silver was discontinued in favour of a nickel version with a very similar design. The annual issues of 3 and 5 Mark commemoratives was slightly adjusted to become 2 and 5 Mark issues, a step away from the pre-decimal thaler system and towards a 1-2-5 system. The 1934 version featured the garrison church in Potsdam, where that handshake had taken place, celebrating the first anniversary of the "Day of Potsdam". The 5 Mark, minus the commemorative dates, became a distinctive nazi coin.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Figleaf

Hindenburg was a complicated character. A hero of a lost war, a rightist nationalist with close connections to the army, a popular political figure, a darling of the establishment, an ally of big industrialists. He despised Hitler, but thought he could control him.

He might have, had he and the world economy been in better health. As it was, the world economy foundered in the aftermath of the mishandled Wall Street crisis, making the Weimar republic politically unstable and paving the way for Hitler and Hindenburg died in 1934. I sometimes wonder about the many parallels between Hindenburg and Pétain. To the nazis, Hindenburg was a hero. They issued a circulating commemorative for him.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Figleaf

By 1935, Hitler had violated the German constitution, several political agreements (including the enabling act, he agreed to on the day of Potsdam) and the treaty of Versailles. He was preparing for war and could no longer be stopped.

The German flag was replaced by the nazi party flag following an incident in New York. The coins were changed to reflect this development. The block letters of Weimar made place for Gothic lettering and the German eagle got a victory wreath in its claws with a swastika in the centre. Strangely, the 1 mark remained unchanged, but Hindenburg was to have a swastika on his behind.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Figleaf

War was inevitable and it changed everything, including the coinage. Mint metals such as bronze and nickel were channeled towards the armament industry and replaced by zinc and aluminium from 1939. Silver was replaced by paper.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Figleaf

The war caused death, suffering, misery and destruction. It ended in chaos, poverty, hunger and mourning and solidified communism. Maybe its only positive effects were a temporary respect for international law and rejection of discrimination by race for a few decades afterwards.

In a sense, nazi coins survived the nazi state. The first post-war coins were minted with nazi dies, with the swastika removed.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Figleaf

I can't resist a happy end (of the non-saccharine kind.) After what was easily the worst chancellor in the history of Germany, the country got what may well be the two best chancellors in the history of Germany. Konrad Adenauer and Ludwig Erhard. Adenauer brought Germany back to democracy and a mixed economy, based on small, family owned companies. Erhard turned the destruction into an opportunity to create and renovate. Together, they achieved what is generally accepted as a modern miracle (Wirtschaftswunder.)

A politician on a coin with the German eagle behind ... full circle since Hindenburg.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

malj1

Quote from: Mackie on March 26, 2012, 09:20:54 PM
TO,

I have a nice collection of Nazi Swastika coins but unfortunately I just have one 5 reichsmark and 2 reichsmark silver coin otherwise I would have given you one gladly.  :P

I have a spare 1936 5 Reichsmark  ;)  ....swapped a train set for an album of German and Russian [pre-revolution] coins. nothing special....

both types that year.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

chrisild

Quote from: Figleaf on March 27, 2012, 11:53:04 PM
The German flag was replaced by the nazi party flag following an incident in New York. The coins were changed to reflect this development. The block letters of Weimar made place for Gothic lettering and the German eagle got a victory wreath in its claws with a swastika in the centre. Strangely, the 1 mark remained unchanged, but Hindenburg was to have a swastika on his behind.

Side note re. that Wikipedia article: The part about, quote, "removing the status of the original flag of the Weimar Republic as co-national flag" is somewhat odd. The flag during the Weimar years was black-red-gold, just like Germany's flag today. The nazis immediately (well, in 1993, long before that "New York incident") replaced that one with the old black-white-red flag which "Prussian Germany" had introduced after the 1871 war - black and white being the colors of Prussia, red and white being those of the Mark (Margraviate) Brandenburg.

The swastika first appeared on coins of the German Empire/Deutsches Reich in 1934, but most denominations initially stayed in use, as far as both production and circulation are concerned. In 1936 the first "Mjölnir" eagle with the swastika in a wreath showed up on the coins.

Side note: One week ago the city of Münster (in NW) did away with the Hindenburgplatz, a square near the main university building. It is now part of the neighboring Schlossplatz. More about the city's decision, and the discussion about such names, in German is here: http://www.muenster.de/stadt/strassennamen/hindenburg.html  Don't think you would find streets named after nazis in this country, but there are quite a few debates about people such as Hindenburg - or Agnes Miegel or Carl Diem - and whether streets, schools, etc. should still have their names.

Christian

humpybong


I have been collecting Third Reich coins for a number of years now and am happy to say that I have a complete set including each mint.

Also have a number of spares if anyone is after any let me know.

;D
Barry

"Experience enables you to recognise a mistake when you make it a again"

The Oracle

i am looking for swastika coins and i can swap the for indian coins.  If anyone has them in Au or better do let me know.  thanks

Prosit

Do you have any spare "B" mintmarked coins such as:

1938-1939 Fifty Pfennig
Nickel, 3.5g, 20mm


or

1938-1939 Five Pfennig
Cu/Al, 2.5g, 18mm

Dale

Quote from: humpybong on March 28, 2012, 12:56:50 PM
I have been collecting Third Reich coins for a number of years now and am happy to say that I have a complete set including each mint.

Also have a number of spares if anyone is after any let me know.

;D