Icelandic marine series, 1981 to date

Started by <k>, March 12, 2012, 01:09:41 AM

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<k>

#15








Here you can see the difference between the coat of arms used on the obverses of the previous Icelandic series and the spirits from the coat of arms as portrayed on the marine series. The new design is very different from the old and has a very distinctive and attractive style.

My own favourite from the new obverses is the intricate dragon. It's rare enough for a coin series to have different designs on each obverse and reverse, but, as in this case, when the two different design themes are so superbly done, the pleasure of looking at them is doubled. Whether the old Icelanders actually drew in this style, I don't know, but the design certainly conveys the flavour of the old mythology.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

chrisild

Interesting, especially your comparisons of Icelandic designs and similar "themes" from other countries. :) As for what currency the country will use in the future, well, up to them. They might as well keep the krona and just peg it to the Canadian dollar ...

Side note: You wrote that currently the lowest denomination in Denmark and Norway is the 50 øre coin. Well, in a few weeks (end of April) you can count Norway out too; then only Denmark will be left with a 0.50 piece.

Christian

<k>

Quote from: chrisild on March 12, 2012, 07:59:50 PM
As for what currency the country will use in the future, well, up to them. They might as well keep the krona and just peg it to the Canadian dollar ...

Christian

Currently there are around 128 Icelandic krona to the Canadian dollar, so that would be an awkward figure for a peg. Iceland could revalue the krona to fit, of course, but that would also mean new coins and probably a new design series.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

My impression is that the dragon design was inspired by the decoration of the bow of a boat or ship.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Illioplius

#19
island_sada2.JPG


Hello. I was looking for these coins around the Internet and what I have found out seems weird to me. There are two types of BU/UNC sets on the market. One type consists of 6 coins: 5 au, 10 au, 50 au, 1 Kr, 5 Kr, 10 Kr (some are even without 10 Kr). Second type consists of 5 coins: 1 Kr, 5 Kr, 10 Kr, 50 Kr, 100 Kr. However, almost no set contains all 8 coins. I have found only one type of set with all 8 coins (in the picture) and they seem quite rare and expensive too (about 25 euros). But what is the worst, I am not sure about coins' quality (especially the copper ones) due to the plastic cover.

Between 1995 and 2003 all 8 coins were in circulation. There are no more serious coin sets from that period?

<k>

#20
From Wikipedia:

Coins of less than one króna have not circulated for many years. In September 2002, Davíð Oddsson, the Icelandic Prime Minister at the time, signed two regulations decreeing that all monetary amounts on invoices and financial claims should be stated and paid in whole krónur only, and that coins with a value of less than one króna should be withdrawn from circulation.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Illioplius

Quote from: <k> on May 16, 2013, 01:14:28 PM
From Wikipedia:

Coins of less than one króna have not circulated for many years. In September 2002, Davíð Oddsson, the Icelandic Prime Minister at the time, signed two regulations decreeing that all monetary amounts on invoices and financial claims should be stated and paid in whole krónur only, and that coins with a value of less than one króna should be withdrawn from circulation.
Sure, I know about that, but between 1995 and 2003 all 8 coins were in circulation. There are no more serious coin sets from that period?

<k>

Quote from: Illioplius on May 16, 2013, 08:44:32 PM
Sure, I know about that, but between 1995 and 2003 all 8 coins were in circulation. There are no more serious coin sets from that period?

My only set is 1981. I acquired the 10, 50 and 100 kronur pieces individually, so I don't know which other sets are available.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

Iceland is different in many ways and some are captured in the coins. Almost no plant survives the long, harsh and dark winter. Domesticated animals have a hard time too. Just about the only food the islanders can produce themselves is seafood, as reflected by the coin design. Everything else is imported.

That also means that the price of everything else contains a significant element of transportation cost. The most expensive hamburger in the world was sold in Reykjavik, until McDonalds gave up on the shop. If the price of beef in Denmark goes up, it goes up in Iceland as well, but the shipper's beef is more expensive also, so shipping cost go up. It the price of oil goes up, shipping cost go up more and before you know it, beef has gone up in price much more in Iceland than in Denmark. Icelandic workers will demand a higher wage and the coins lose value, the smallest disappear and larger denominations must be minted.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

chrisild

Have not been to Iceland yet, but do coins actually circulate there? After all, 100 kr (the highest denomination) is about €0.62 ... My guess is that most payments are not cash based anyway. Any first hand experience?

Christian

Illioplius

I was there in 2007, thus before the recession, and the coins were in normal circulation. I still have various coins from 1 Kr to 100 Kr. However, I don't know how is it today with the coins.

Regarding the weather, I don't agree with Figleaf. Thanks to the Gulf Stream, Iceland has much warmer climate than one would guess from the map. During my visit to Akureyri (town in the northern part of Iceland) I was in local botanical garden with many beautiful plants. It's not rare to see the tree in Iceland, however they are mostly there where people live.

Figleaf

I was there in September 2008. I received only a few (less than 5) 100 kr. pieces in circulation.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

chrisild

Thanks, I see. Was just wondering because, in other Nordic countries, the setup is quite different, with the "smallest" circulation coins having a value of €0.10 or so these days. Maybe Iceland should issue new (higher denomination) coins then - would not mind having them in my collection. ;)

Christian

Illioplius

Perhaps better for them would be redenomination of currency. They are issuing 10,000 Kr banknote and it still is an equivalent to just 62 €.

Illioplius

#29
DSC00197.jpg

Here are my coins from my trip to Iceland in 2007. :)
All together, they are worth something little over 4 €.