Author Topic: Imperial China, Ch'ing Dynasty: Xian Feng (1851-1861) FE 10 Cash, Peking Mint  (Read 941 times)

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Offline Quant.Geek

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Imperial China, Ch'ing Dynasty: Xian Feng (1851-1861) FE 10 Cash, Board of Revenue, Peking (Hartill-22.737)

Obv: 咸豐重寶 Xian Feng zhong bao
Rev: Numbers for denomination above and below, mint left and right in Manchu; 當十 ᠪᠣᠣ ᠴᡠᠸᠠᠨ; Dang shi (Value Ten) Boo chiowan

A high-resolution image of this coin is available at FORVM Ancient Coins

A gallery of my coins can been seen at FORVM Ancient Coins

Offline Figleaf

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Apart from the mint, at 9 o'clock, the other difference with the Fujian variant is the character on top (Dāng). You have translated this as "valid". I beg to differ. Run it past Google translate and you will find that it means something like "to be equal". In other words, this coin matches, should be taken for 10 cash.

In my previous comment, I tried to outline the confusion between token money and underweight money at the place and time of issue. Dāng implies: this is not 10 cash in metal, but it serves as such. That's the token interpretation. I think "valid" is too close to the underweight interpretation and too far from the original meaning.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Quant.Geek

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I am assuming you meant Value.  That is how Hartill referred to the coins, but your explanation makes more sense given the background behind these coins...Thanks.
A gallery of my coins can been seen at FORVM Ancient Coins