Author Topic: Japan: No 1 Yen Coins Anymore?  (Read 1421 times)

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Offline Bimat

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Japan: No 1 Yen Coins Anymore?
« on: February 18, 2012, 06:30:09 AM »
No 1-yen coins minted in 2011, 1st time in 43 years

TOKYO (Kyodo) -- No 1-yen coins were minted for general use in 2011 for the first time in 43 years due to the spread of electronic payments at retail stores, Japan Mint officials said Friday.

No 5-yen or 50-yen coins were minted last year for the second consecutive year, the officials said.

A total of 456,000 of the three coins were minted in 2011 for inclusion in collector sets and the number of 1-yen coins sold in the sets fell to around 5 percent of the level in the previous year. The collector sets were sold out.

Demand for 1-yen coins grew with the introduction of the 3 percent consumption tax in 1989. The annual amount minted peaked at more than 2.7 billion in 1990 but has declined since.

(Mainichi Japan) February 18, 2012

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Caution. The low-hanging fruits are still there maybe for a reason.

Offline Globetrotter

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Re: Japan: No 1 Yen Coins Anymore?
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2017, 05:09:22 PM »
my last is from 2008 (20)

ole
Ole

If you're interested in coin variants please find some English documentation here:
https://sites.google.com/site/coinvarietiescollection/home
and in French on Michel's site (the presentations are not the same):
http://monnaiesetvarietes.esy.es/

Offline Verify-12

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Re: Japan: No 1 Yen Coins Anymore?
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2017, 04:24:06 PM »
I guess Japanese law doesn't require their minting.  In some countries, mints keep manufacturing coins the population doesn't need just because the central banking laws demand it, or the legislatures pass laws and don't repeal them, resulting in numerous coins that nobody uses.   I'm thinking of the USA's presidents dollar-coins.

There are a few of these Japanese 1 Yen coins that are VERY difficult (for me!) to find in Mint State condition:  1960, 1961, 1962, and 1969.

Offline KennyisaG

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Re: Japan: No 1 Yen Coins Anymore?
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2017, 07:04:57 AM »
Recently I've been visiting plenty of coin shops in my area, and have been picking up all the Japanese coins I can find, to both sell and spend in Japan. So far I've found 2060 1 yen coins, with 594 minted Showa 44 and earlier (JNDA lists these at a higher value). Since they haven't been circulating for many years and mostly in pound bags, I've been finding plenty of these in higher grade, even Showa 30 UNC, among other denominations in early year and high grade.
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Offline Prosit

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Re: Japan: No 1 Yen Coins Anymore?
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2017, 02:20:11 PM »
The USA Presidential Dollar Coins are currently only minted for collectors. The last Presidential Dollars struck for general circulation (they don't circulate) was in 2011.
 
Dale



I guess Japanese law doesn't require their minting.  In some countries, mints keep manufacturing coins the population doesn't need just because the central banking laws demand it, or the legislatures pass laws and don't repeal them, resulting in numerous coins that nobody uses.   I'm thinking of the USA's presidents dollar-coins.

There are a few of these Japanese 1 Yen coins that are VERY difficult (for me!) to find in Mint State condition:  1960, 1961, 1962, and 1969.

Offline Verify-12

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Re: Japan: No 1 Yen Coins Anymore?
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2017, 01:19:25 AM »
Well, I am having a very hard time finding One Yen and Five Yen coins in UNC/BU (without problems) with the dates Showa 35, 36, 37 (1960, 61, 62).   Plenty of chewed up/severely-worn examples to be found, easily.   And 1969 (Showa 44) One yen is hard to find in decent condition, too.   There are plenty of them on eBay, but they are all in that expensive 1969 Bank of Japan mint set.

These seven coins (in UNC+ grades) almost never come up for bid anywhere.  They are listed in catalogs at low(er) prices, too; even in high grade.

I have a "Toho Planning" coin binder (album) from around 1980.  I have these early 60s dates in the holes, but they are all very rough for wear.


Offline KennyisaG

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Re: Japan: No 1 Yen Coins Anymore?
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2017, 05:57:32 AM »
Well, I am having a very hard time finding One Yen and Five Yen coins in UNC/BU (without problems) with the dates Showa 35, 36, 37 (1960, 61, 62).   Plenty of chewed up/severely-worn examples to be found, easily.   And 1969 (Showa 44) One yen is hard to find in decent condition, too.   There are plenty of them on eBay, but they are all in that expensive 1969 Bank of Japan mint set.

These seven coins (in UNC+ grades) almost never come up for bid anywhere.  They are listed in catalogs at low(er) prices, too; even in high grade.

I've been very lucky to find plenty of pre-44 1 yen coins in high grade and UNC in the US. I keep all pre-44 1 yen in a separate bag from other years.
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Offline Enlil

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Re: Japan: No 1 Yen Coins Anymore?
« Reply #7 on: April 02, 2017, 08:40:15 PM »
Lots of them were issued in 2014-16.

Offline SquareEarth

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Re: Japan: No 1 Yen Coins Anymore?
« Reply #8 on: July 20, 2017, 06:27:46 PM »
I'm travelling around in Japan now, the annoying thing is that no vending machine or ticket kiosk accepts those 1 yen coins.

I think the meaning of this coin is to make the unit "yen" meaningful, otherwise the Japanese might just cancel off two zeros in their currency, and make the 100 yen coin the new Japanese "dollar".
Tong Bao_Tsuho_Tong Bo_Thong Bao