Author Topic: Heraldry on coins  (Read 363 times)

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Offline <k>

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Heraldry on coins
« on: September 18, 2018, 11:13:47 AM »
Heraldry is still all too prevalent on coins, especially on the coins of my own country, the UK. It dates back to medieval times and earlier and has little to say to the modern mind. Just occasionally, though, I see a heraldic design that is unusual and stands out.

Here, this old design from Luxembourg stands out because of the way the shield is tilted, together with the large feather (?)

Do you have any heraldic designs to post, that you especially like?

Offline chrisild

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Re: Heraldry on coins
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2018, 02:02:11 PM »
The CoA on Spanish coins from the years of Franco's dictatorship I find quite interesting. Not because of El Caudillo :P but due to all those details (which you don't see that often on modern coins). Here is an example:



Offline chrisild

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Re: Heraldry on coins
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2018, 02:03:37 PM »
The above 5 pesetas coin shows the CoA and eagle used by Franco's regime. After the end of the dictatorship, Juan Carlos introduced a new, "reduced" CoA representing (top left) Castilla, (top right) León, (bottom left) Aragon, (bottom right) Navarra, Granada at the very bottom, and the house of Bourbon-Anjou in the center. On this 1 peseta coin it is even a little abstract. Both images are from Wikipedia; you will probably have to scroll horizontally in order to see everything. :)



Christian

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Heraldry on coins
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2018, 12:20:28 PM »
The first arms are of the royal houses of Spain since its unification until the ascent of the house of Bourbon, with the exception of the period when Portugal was Spanish occupied, when the arms had a Portuguese heart shield. The second are the arms since the ascent of the house of Bourbon.

Franco was a paleo-conservative dictator. He saw himself as a caretaker for Spanish royalty. By not using the Bourbon heart shield and going for the Habsburg arms instead, Franco left open the possibility that another house than Bourbon would return after him. The Spanish Habsburgs line was extinct in 1700 with the death of Charles II. The Austrian Habsburgs became extinct in 1740. However, Maria-Theresia's offspring had started a new branch: Habsburg-Lorraine. The Bourbons were still around, notably the Spanish legitimists in France (Bourbon-Anjou), the "count of Barcelona" (Bourbon) and the Carlists (Bourbon-Parma). Eventually, Franco chose the house of Bourbon (Juan Carlos I) as his successor. It was proper, though anachronistic for them to revive the arms with the Bourbon heart shield as the Spanish arms.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.