Author Topic: Countries without their own currency  (Read 16724 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline ciscoins

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 341
    • Coins of CIS and Baltic countries
Re: Countries without their own currency
« Reply #15 on: January 11, 2010, 03:54:50 PM »
There are some banknotes of Scotland: http://www.rampantscotland.com/SCM/royal.htm

But for me they are local unusual issues. Something like banknotes and coins of Tatarstan (one of Russian regions-republics). I think that issuing its own currency doesn't make some territory a country. The easiest way is to call "a country" only the members of the UN. All the other coins and banknotes issues should be considered unusual.
Ivan
Moscow, Russia

Offline Pabitra

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 411

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31 322
Re: Countries without their own currency
« Reply #17 on: September 18, 2014, 12:00:08 AM »
How odd to think that a common currency is a foreign currency...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8 717
  • NW · DE · EU
Re: Countries without their own currency
« Reply #18 on: September 18, 2014, 12:28:13 AM »
How odd to think that a common currency is a foreign currency...

Consider the source ...

Christian

Offline Escudos

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 17
Re: Countries without their own currency
« Reply #19 on: September 21, 2014, 12:08:42 PM »
Faro Islands has their own papir money,  but no coins. Issued by the Danish national bank, And only legal tender on the Islands

Offline Bimat

  • आदित्य
  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11 485
  • Mumbai, India.
Countries without their own currency
« Reply #20 on: September 21, 2014, 02:38:10 PM »
Faro Islands has their own papir money,  but no coins. Issued by the Danish national bank, And only legal tender on the Islands

Same is the case with Scotland; however it's not a separate country...Interesting case indeed. ;)

I believe that Scottish banknotes are not legal tender in the UK (or in other Channel Islands).

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Enlil

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 300
Re: Countries without their own currency
« Reply #21 on: October 03, 2014, 11:01:33 AM »
Australian dollar Nauru, Tuvalu and Kiribati have their own coins. U.S dollar, Micronesia, Palau, East Timor (own coins), Marshall Islands.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 873
Re: Countries without their own currency
« Reply #22 on: October 03, 2014, 11:37:24 AM »
Tuvalu and Kiribati have their own coins.

Their last coins are dated 1994 and 1992 respectively. They now use the Australian dollar again, though some of their old coins may still circulate. Kiribati and Tuvalu have never issued their own banknotes.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline eurocoin

  • Technical posts member
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3 962
Re: Countries without their own currency
« Reply #23 on: March 11, 2016, 07:12:32 AM »
Their last coins are dated 1994 and 1992 respectively. They now use the Australian dollar again, though some of their old coins may still circulate. Kiribati and Tuvalu have never issued their own banknotes.

The circulating coins from Tuvalu are still in circulation on the island, only the 1c and 2c coins of Tuvalu are very rare in circulation. The Ministry of Finance of Tuvalu ignored my question whether they are planning to introduce new coins

Offline onecenter

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 156
Re: Countries without their own currency
« Reply #24 on: March 11, 2016, 09:26:55 PM »
At times, the New Zealand autonomous, self-governing Cook Islands have fallen into the no currency club.

The Republic of Panama does not print its own currency, if I remember correctly.  Panama uses US dollars.  Panamanian coinage co-circulates with American coinage.

The Republic of Liberia may be another case.  Our very knowledgeable members may know for sure.

Other candidate-countries are Ecuador, El Salvador and Zimbabwe.
Mark

Offline Pabitra

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 411
Re: Countries without their own currency
« Reply #25 on: March 12, 2016, 04:58:38 AM »
Cook Island just issued a new series recently, after a long time ( excl. a fantasy set in between).

Panama coins have been issued upto 1 Balboa and announced plans for 2 and 5 Balboa.

Liberia issued only 5 Dollar coin quite some time back and have a new central Bank Governor who is evaluating issue of a series of coins. The US Dollar will remain the currency.

Ecuador and El Salvador have no plans of coins as of now.

Zimbabwe has bond coins since late 2014 which are de facto equivalent to US cents.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 873
Re: Countries without their own currency
« Reply #26 on: July 15, 2020, 02:24:39 PM »
Here I will 'bump' this thread and ask our member Pabitra to comment.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline Pabitra

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 411
Re: Countries without their own currency
« Reply #27 on: July 15, 2020, 06:08:23 PM »
Not much change from March 2016.
Panama modified its coat of Arms to have 10 stars ( instead of 9 earlier) but higher coins than 1 Balboa did not come through.
Liberia and Somalia failed to come out with circulation coins.
Liberia continued to fight administrative scam of missing currency notes hence coins got a back seat.

Interesting issue was Libya Dinar coin, legal tender in Eastern part only which considers itself to be main Libya as a result of civil war. Otherwise coins vanished from circulation, having been last issued in 2014.

Quite a few countries, having issued coins, saw them vanish from circulation. Notable of them is South Sudan and Syria.

Swaziland issued 20 cents with new name "eSwatini" ( reminds me of iPhone).

Timor issued a 200 Centavos which again is a sub unit or a unit. Suriname also issues a 100 cent and 250 cent coin, without talking of Dollar as a unit. Only country which had that practice and has given up is Saudi Arabia, which used to issue 100 Halala coin. Now it has 1 Riyal and 2 Riyals coins.

Zimbabwe issued a 2 Dollar bond coin in November 2019 but appears to be back on track of hyperinflation.

Another country gone coinless is Iceland which has been planning a new series since 2014.

None of old well known coinless countries like Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Mongolia, Vietnam, Afghanistan etc have made any attempt to issue coins.

Ghana issued a 2 Cedi coin despite being part of new West African Economic community, original members of which renamed their CFA as Eco but no news about any remonetisation. The highest coin is 500 CFA. It would have been right time to get 1 Eco = 100 CFA but then political discord continues to hamper that community.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 873
Re: Countries without their own currency
« Reply #28 on: July 15, 2020, 08:18:57 PM »
Thank you for your observations, Pabitra.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.