Belgian varieties

Started by Figleaf, January 25, 2012, 09:57:15 PM

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Figleaf

#30
Quote from: Aernout on January 28, 2012, 11:53:10 AM
Here a link to the study: http://www.muntstukken.be/forum/index.php/topic,22502.0.html

Just in case your Dutch leaves to be desired, four members of a Belgian coin forum report on their findings. Together, they have checked around 500 coins of 20 centimes, miner type. Their conclusion is that on all coins of 1953, 1954 and 1960 the denomination does not touch the edge. Therefore, KM 147.2 does not exist. They also found no trace of 1954 French, reported as existent in KM, not in the standard Belgian catalogue (Morin) and they think it does not exist either.

On all the French coins, the word centimes touches the rim, except on the coins of 1953. On all the Flemish coins, the word centimen does not touch the rim.
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Figleaf

Quote from: Aernout on January 28, 2012, 11:49:19 AM
So we know that the 117.1 had 3 200 000 ex. could we still talk about mules or hybrids ?

Excellent point, Aernout. Your thinking is that mules normally have a limited run. That is because quality control will spot them eventually and stop their distribution. Mules are normally easy to spot. One side of the coin is wrong, sometimes completely wrong. At worst, it is just a question of a missing date, another element that quality control could see easily.

However, in this case, both sides of the coin are correct. The only giveaway that something is wrong is on the edge and even that looks right at first sight, until you start thinking in terms of language sub-types. The possibilities for mules slipping through are huge. There is even the possibility that quality control did notice and management decided to save cost by letting them go anyway. For an example of such action, see this thread.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Aernout

Quote from: Figleaf on January 28, 2012, 12:32:53 PM
There is even the possibility that quality control did notice and management decided to save cost by letting them go anyway.

Also a possibility !

Then we have still the mixed up crown ans star varieties.
Also a error ? By taking the wrong barrel with 'flans' (blanco coin plates) ??

Picture with star and crown (attachement)

mvg,
Aernout
Start small to end magnificent - Start klein om groots te eindigen.

Globetrotter

Quote from: Aernout on January 26, 2012, 08:02:21 PMNever had one in my hands, but 'reported' on the site of Numismatica Belgica (= NB)

A big S on the small s

ist not the same, a small prove that the exist ?

Foto 'borrowed" from "Ditchw" on http://www.numismaticabelgica.be/forum/index.php?topic=1000.0

mvg,
Aernout
Link is no longer active!

Globetrotter

Here is my documentation of the 1920 cts km85.1 versus km85.2

I liked this thread until I figured out, that images illustrating the different variants were quite often missing. An image can substitute many words and is easier to understand!

Figleaf

Ole, in your images, I think I can see ghosting of the second line below the centre of the E (beginning of the upper line) and below the left part of the E. If so, that would mean that these are not die varieties but a dirty die "error". This would make much sense, as the mit produced many errors caused by sloppy methods in this period.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.