Author Topic: Independence on coins  (Read 17163 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #60 on: March 01, 2018, 01:59:47 AM »
Sao Tome, 250 dobras, 1977.  Folklore statue.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #61 on: March 03, 2018, 08:49:41 PM »
Somalia, 50 shillings, 1970.  10th anniversary of independence. What is the vessel that he is holding? Can I see "INCENSE" or similar written on it?
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Offline eurocoin

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #62 on: March 03, 2018, 09:10:08 PM »
What is the vessel that he is holding? Can I see "INCENSE" or similar written on it?

Incenso, which is incense.

Offline <k>

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #63 on: March 03, 2018, 09:46:40 PM »
I thought so - an unusual design.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #64 on: October 10, 2018, 11:50:56 AM »


Algeria, 200 dinars, 2012.  50 years of independence.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #65 on: January 01, 2019, 01:30:42 PM »
Angola, 50 and 100 kwanzas, 2015.  But Angola still uses the colonial language.
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #66 on: January 01, 2019, 03:35:04 PM »
Angola, 50 and 100 kwanzas, 2015.  But Angola still uses the colonial language.

Yes, Portuguese is the official language there. Just as French, English or Spanish are official languages in other countries that used to be colonies. Makes some sense to me, especially in cases like this one where replacing the "European" language with one local language would not work ...

Christian