Author Topic: Independence on coins  (Read 15483 times)

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Offline chrisild

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #30 on: January 27, 2012, 12:27:54 PM »
The German Democratic Republic (GDR, East G.) was founded in October 1949. So in 1969 this circulating commem (see attached image) was issued. Five years later, for the 25th anniversary, two 10 M pieces came out - one in Cu-Ni, one in silver (with different designs). Others were issued in 1979 (30 years, 20 M) and 1989 (40 years, 10 M). One year later the country became history; in 1990 the states of the GDR joined the Federal Republic.

Christian

Offline chrisild

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #31 on: January 27, 2012, 12:43:50 PM »
Switzerland is a little more difficult. :) This coin from 1991 (see attachment, image from Wikipedia) commemorates the 700th anniversary of the 1291 Federal Charter which is considered the nucleus of the country. Another important date with regard to Swiss independence is 1648 when Switzerland, by and large, left the Holy Roman Empire ...

Christian

paisepagal

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #32 on: January 27, 2012, 12:45:12 PM »
Switzerland is a little more difficult. :) This coin from 1991 (see attachment, image from Wikipedia) commemorates the 700th anniversary of the 1291 Federal Charter which is considered the nucleus of the country. Another important date with regard to Swiss independence is 1648 when Switzerland, by and large, left the Holy Roman Empire ...

Christian

Curious design, what's it supposed to mean ?

Offline adam

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #33 on: January 28, 2012, 06:45:17 AM »
Curious design, what's it supposed to mean ?

I think it's moving forward Swiss cross.
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #34 on: January 28, 2012, 10:39:08 AM »
Yes, that's exactly what it is. The two elements are the Swiss cross, appearing four times (thus symbolizing the four language regions as far as I know), and this "motion" which means that 1291 was the starting point of a long process ...

Christian

paisepagal

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #35 on: January 28, 2012, 10:46:26 AM »
Thanks... I understand the forward movement ... And now the 4 arrow heads makes sense.... But maybe I'm missing something ... I can't see a cross per se from any angle ... And do the lines on either end have some meaning too ? The first few point one way ... And then the last few sort of open up

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #36 on: January 28, 2012, 11:36:07 AM »
Draw an imaginary arrowhead in opposite direction at the second date. Can you see the cross on top now? There are three others behind it. Keep in mind the the four arms of the Swiss cross are the same length. You see the design as two-dimensional, while it is three-dimensional.

The design is difficult to grasp, but once you got it, quite powerful. The crosses are not there, the brain creates them in 3D. The movement, depth and the attempt to make you forget how round the coin is all work together to create a modern and advanced coin design.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #37 on: January 28, 2012, 11:58:25 AM »
Here's my attempt to explain, but I'm no Picasso.  :-[

paisepagal

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #38 on: January 28, 2012, 12:01:09 PM »
Here's my attempt to explain, but I'm no Picasso.  :-[

Ah ! I was trying to imagine something that was staring me in the face ... Doh!  ;D

Very nice design indeed.. Thats a very incitely way to put an idea across

Offline <k>

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #39 on: January 30, 2012, 01:49:42 AM »
Israel, 1981, 2 sheqels.  33rd Anniversary of Independence - People of the Book.







« Last Edit: February 07, 2012, 01:10:22 AM by coffeetime »

Offline bart

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #40 on: February 04, 2012, 01:36:55 PM »
Malta 2 liri 1989 - 25th Anniversary of Independence, showing the effigy of Giorgio Borg Olivier, who was Prime-Minister at the time of Independence.

Offline ciscoins

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #41 on: February 09, 2012, 12:30:25 AM »
Sri Lanka, 50 years
Ivan
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Offline <k>

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #42 on: February 12, 2012, 07:39:09 PM »
Austria, 10 euro, 2005.   60th Anniversary of the Republic.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #43 on: February 13, 2012, 01:37:57 AM »
The symbolism of the broken chain also occurs on the circulation coins of that period, as the eagle is wearing the chain on its legs. Also, the orb and scepter ended up being replaced by quite different ornaments, not seen on this coin :)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #44 on: February 13, 2012, 11:36:17 PM »
Yes, the broken chain was added after WW2. In the First Republic, the Austrian eagle had one head with a mural crown (symbol of the bourgeoisie), and in its feet a hammer (industrial workers) and a sickle (peasants/farmers). The Austrofascist regime replaced that symbol with a double-headed eagle with empty feet. When Austria was part of Nazi Germany, it used the eagle with the swastika. After WW2, when Austria became independent again, it added the broken chain.

That "post-war eagle" is still the emblem of the republic. However, it has not been used on euro coins, with the exception of one proof-only collector piece in 2003.

Christian