Author Topic: Independence on coins  (Read 17360 times)

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Offline <k>

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Independence on coins
« on: January 21, 2012, 04:40:17 PM »
Independence: a tricky theme, because it is an abstract concept. Out of all the history and culture of your country, how do you choose a subject that projects this theme to the world and to your own people?

Mauritius received its independence from the British in 1968. In 1971 it chose to issue a 10 rupees coin to celebrate this. The reverse of the coin depicted a dodo on the reverse, an extinct flightless bird of Mauritius that has become one of the country's emblems. Was this a good omen or a bad one? Will Mauritius also become extinct when the oceans rise?  :-\





 

« Last Edit: March 03, 2018, 11:42:28 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2012, 04:48:00 PM »
Rwanda, 200 francs, 1972: 10th Anniversary of Independence. Two men shake hands in front of the Rwandan flag.



 
« Last Edit: March 27, 2019, 10:39:45 AM by <k> »
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Online Figleaf

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2012, 05:01:06 PM »
Depending on your political outlook, the Netherlands achieved independence somewhere between 1568 and 1648. At the time, it was known as the Republic of the Seven United Netherlands, or simply "the Republic", since there weren't any others (Venice claimed to be, but it did appoint a feudal type ruler.) It was one of the first times in history that a people succeeded in fighting off their feudal ruler without getting a new one instead, but it was a process, not an occasion. Most historians put the date of independence at 1579, since in that year, the seven autonomous parts agreed to a federation. The pact is known as the Union of Utrecht. It is also often considered to be the country's first constitution.

The coin celebrating independence does not mention the word, since other dates could also be said to be the date of independence. Its design is arguably the worst since independence.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2012, 05:27:24 PM »
That's a difficult one. Who did the UK become independent FROM? Or should we include establishment of a state here, as well as independence?

I suppose the Act of Union of 1707, which officially united England and Scotland, would be the best date for the establishment of the UK.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2019, 10:44:43 AM by <k> »
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Online Figleaf

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2012, 05:40:51 PM »
I see no difference between independence and establishing a state. As for England, I would argue that it became independent of the Norsemen and Normans at the end of the 100 years war, somewhere between 1428 and 1453 with the loss of Aquitaine. Afterwards, there was no reason for English kings like Richard Lionheart to live in France, unable to speak English. The event is unlikely to be celebrated on a coin, though.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2012, 06:02:06 PM »
For Israel, independence was a traumatic affair. Centuries of persecution, culminating with mass murder in the second world war made jews all over the world come to their ancient homeland. However, that was already taken by Arabs. Independence therefore became the start of what was to become a series of wars and insurrections.

The seven-armed candelabra (menorah) for this piece on 10 years of independence is the symbol of light in the same tradition as Diwali and Christmas. I find the design magnificent. The piece is slightly concave (as on a very similar Irish commemorative for independence), creating an illusion of three dimansions and an attempt to make you forget how round coins are. The value side is ex-centric, yet balanced, sober, yet impressive.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline bart

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2012, 06:05:24 PM »
The independence of Belgium was commemorated in several coins:
- 1 and 2 francs in 1880 (50 years of independence), showing Leopold I and II and only issued in french;
- 10 francs in 1930 (100 years of independence - the piece I have in my collection is quite damaged), showing Leopold I, II and Albert I. This coin was issued both in flemish and french
- 500 francs in 1980 (150 years of independence), showing Leopold I, II, Albert I, Leopold III and Baudouin. This coin was also issued both in flemish and french.

Offline <k>

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2012, 08:19:50 PM »


This coin of 1944 commemorates the 5th anniversary of Slovakia's independence in 1939. Slovakia at that time was never really independent, of course, but merely a puppet state of the Nazis. Her "independence" had less than a year to go after the issue of that coin, which now looks so doom-laden. It depicts Jozef Tiso, a Catholic priest and the authoritarian leader of the Slovak People’s Party and of the Slovak state.
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Online Figleaf

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2012, 08:53:51 PM »
A commemorative for Pádraig Mac Piarais (Patrick Pearse), the romantic, naive school teacher who lead the Easter rising to its murderous end, becoming an Irish hero in the process. Another hero of a revolution and connected to the Israeli piece shown upthread by its concavity and sparse design.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #9 on: January 21, 2012, 09:13:04 PM »
Finnish independence came as an occasion, followed by a long period of being under threat. The coin reflects this, by not having the word independence on it.

I think this is one of the most beautiful coins on independence ever made. On one side, swans suggest all kinds of things, from discipline (formation) to sacrifice (the cruciform) to freedom (flying), while making a connection to the other side with the style of rendering. The other side shows high-rise construction and bridge building, suggesting modernity and political healing.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Prosit

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #10 on: January 21, 2012, 11:28:31 PM »
200th Anniversary of US Independance. This is my example of the 1776-1976 US Quarter Dollar.  It is uncirculated.
I like the design.
Dale

Offline <k>

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #11 on: January 22, 2012, 12:24:40 AM »
Albania, 1937, 1 franga ar.  25 years of independence. Oops - has Mussolini seen that?  :-X
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Offline <k>

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #12 on: January 22, 2012, 12:39:10 AM »
Surinam, 10 gulden, 1976. First anniversary of independence.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #13 on: January 22, 2012, 12:42:54 AM »
South Korea. 30th Anniversary of Independence, 1975.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Independence on coins
« Reply #14 on: January 22, 2012, 12:53:48 AM »
China, 1989, 1 yuan. 40th anniversary of independence.
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