Author Topic: Portuguese India: some newer coins  (Read 10375 times)

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Offline Rangnath

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Re: Portuguese India: some newer coins
« Reply #15 on: March 08, 2008, 08:30:50 PM »
Martin,
in the age of automated coin machines, making coins exactly the same size makes sense. Wouldn't flattening a coin to increase its size be something of a first?  I'm looking foward to hearing more about that.

Aldo,
are the slang expressions you mentioned still in use?
do the Portuguese have something like "tiene due al tango"?  :)
And are Tanga and Tango related through slang?
richie

Offline humpybong

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Re: Portuguese India: some newer coins
« Reply #16 on: March 08, 2008, 11:37:55 PM »



....and here is me thinking it was a dance..... ;D
Barry



"Experience enables you to recognise a mistake when you make it a again"

Offline Rangnath

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Re: Portuguese India: some newer coins
« Reply #17 on: March 09, 2008, 12:00:35 AM »
Humpybong,
I thought you looked a bit familiar.  Weren't you one of the officials at Le Mans?

Tanga Rikshaw:  brings back fond memories

Offline lusomosa

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Re: Portuguese India: some newer coins
« Reply #18 on: March 09, 2008, 12:36:12 AM »
Hi Richie,

Aldo didn't reply yet, but I can testify that the expressions relating to the Tanga are still current and widely used.
As to Tango.... I don't really know the origin the that word and it has no connection with the Portuguese word Tanga.
"it takes two to Tango" I only heard from native English speakers. I never heard anything similar in Portuguese.

All the best,

LP

Offline Bookworm

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Re: Portuguese India: some newer coins
« Reply #19 on: March 09, 2008, 07:29:15 PM »
Aldo,
are the slang expressions you mentioned still in use?
do the Portuguese have something like "tiene due al tango"?  :)
And are Tanga and Tango related through slang?

Richie,
Lusomosa already replied about the use of tanga in portuguese slang (obrigado, Luis!). As for tango, the only use I can recall (besides the dance, of course) is a beverage (two thirds beer, one third gooseberry syrup) that was popular among young ladies in the north of the country about twenty years ago. I don't know if it's still called that, or if the name was only used locally. We southeners wouldn't be caught dead drinking that %$#@...  :P

Aldo

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Portuguese India: some newer coins
« Reply #20 on: March 09, 2008, 08:51:38 PM »
I’d like to hear more about the origin of the word “tanga”.  It is not related to the word “takka”, the old Indian denomination?

A “tanka” in Tibet and Bhutan was a “portable” religious painting. 
A “tanga” in India was a “portable” vestibule, or an expanded motorcycle, used to carry several people.  Or is the emphasis on the concept of "little" as LP mentioned? A little taxi? A little religious "mural"?
Isn’t a coin a small portable work of art used to carry commerce?

Yes, takka definitely belongs in the list of words. The denomination was also used in the Himalayan countries, which would make sense in view of its Chinese origin. Lusomosa says that tanga means "something small" in Portuguese. Isn't it likely that it would have meant something small in India (and especially Goa) also? It fits in well with something portable, a small car/taxi, even with a tiny piece of clothing (as an economist, I have long given up trying to find a relation between price and amount of fabric used in clothing). I would presume that it was a comment on the buying power of the coin, rather than on its physical size, since we know of truly small silver pieces from the Indian subcontinent.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bookworm

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Re: Portuguese India: some newer coins
« Reply #21 on: March 09, 2008, 10:40:15 PM »
I'm afraid in portuguese tanga only means small in the sense of a small piece of underwear...
My guess is that the coin was called a tanga because it sounded like the name of a local coin. As was the case of the Portuguese India's coin "Xerafim", whose name derived from "Ashrafi".

Aldo

translateltd

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Re: Portuguese India: some newer coins
« Reply #22 on: March 10, 2008, 03:16:31 AM »
Martin,
in the age of automated coin machines, making coins exactly the same size makes sense. Wouldn't flattening a coin to increase its size be something of a first?  I'm looking foward to hearing more about that.


Here's the quote from my dealer contact:

>I know the coin and do recall I was told by Scott Semans it was done by the Indians as a symbolic gesture to crushing of Portuguese after centuries of occupation.

Sounds like rather a lot of effort to go to, but then the coin doesn't appear to have circulated either - there are some flattening marks on the face that are evident on the enlargement that aren't so clear in real life.
 

Offline Rangnath

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Re: Portuguese India: some newer coins
« Reply #23 on: March 10, 2008, 05:43:46 PM »
>"I know the coin and do recall I was told by Scott Semans it was done by the Indians as a symbolic gesture to crushing of Portuguese after centuries of occupation."

That does not sound like a logical or rational explanation to me!  I could see the army or some other organization collecting such coins and defacing them, but not carefully flattening the edge of a coin not intended for circulation just to somehow symbolize an end to Portuguese oppression. If one is going to SMASH a coin, then really SMASH IT! It is far too subtle an act to have been achieved at the cost of way too much time and effort. Even then there might have been value in melting them down. I saw some incredible stupidity perpetrated by Indian bureaucracies in the 1960’s, but never something as completely inane as that.
 
On the other hand, I shouldn't underestimate bureaucracies, should I?

richie
   

Offline Bookworm

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Re: Portuguese India: some newer coins
« Reply #24 on: March 10, 2008, 07:22:27 PM »
Thanks for the info, Martin. I must say I agree with Richie. Why bother with such a subtle message, when the indian military had already literally crushed the portuguese... Unless... Maybe the flattening was done before the indian invasion, as a propaganda move.

Aldo

paisepagal

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Re: Portuguese India: some newer coins
« Reply #25 on: November 25, 2011, 04:53:15 PM »
This is quite an interesting thing to note... I always assumed that maybe the machinery wasn't upto the mark and these coins were pressed like that... I cannot imagine the Indian army doing anything so silly as it was obvious who would win. The Portuguese had no chance in goa and thankfully the last portuguese governor general did not accept the salazar's order to burn goan cities to the ground. But I'lk try to find out from some old timers if there's any truth to this.