Author Topic: Storing coins  (Read 1648 times)

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Offline aws22

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Storing coins
« on: July 16, 2016, 07:50:20 PM »
Thank you Peter, I have some acetone, I will do that. I normally do not clean my old coins; after I buy them I put them inside plastic bags for storage. I add a piece of paper with all the data concerning each coin.

Maythem
Coin collecting has a curious name. It is also called the "Hobby of Kings".

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Storing coins
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2016, 08:55:29 PM »
Unfortunately, this is not a safe way to store your coins. Plastic bags contain a chemical softener that will attack metals in the long run. At first, the metal will become dull, but this can be removed with acetone. Next, the dulness can no longer be removed. In the end, a green, bad smelling slime will form. Also, plastic bags can become moist on the inside in a hot environment, due to condensation. Water will lead to metal corrosion.

Paper will also often contain chemicals that react with metals. Gold and silver are usually resistant, but brass, zinc and tin will be affected quickly. Aluminium and copper-nickel will become dull. The top layer of aluminium may become a white powder (this also happens when aluminium coins are too tight together) and copper-nickel may form a black crust.

There are several solutions. The most expensive is a coin cabinet of high quality wood (glue and young wood are dangerous). The cheapest are coin cartons. Most modern cartons do not contain softener, but very cheap and older cartons may still attack coins. Plastic boxes with watertight clips on four sides should protect against condensation, but I have never tried it in practice. Maybe our Indian members know more.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline aws22

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Re: Storing coins
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2016, 10:14:35 PM »
Thank you Peter but you have closed all the doors, leaving no practical way of storing coins. How about Coin Envelopes Coin/ Storage Wallets, those are especially made for storing coins?
What you have mentioned, I thought is applicable to Banknotes storage. Normally we buy coins from the seller stored in plastic bags and that is the only way they have in storing them.
From now on, I will try think of an alternative.

Maythem
Coin collecting has a curious name. It is also called the "Hobby of Kings".

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Storing coins
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2016, 11:03:08 PM »
Those 5x5 cm (2x2 inch) coin bags could be safe, but I have had bad experience with them. Maybe older ones are still around and used for sending coins by mail.

Coin cartons have the same size as the coin bags. You can see what they look like here. You fold them around the coin and close them with staples (don't look so nice) or glue (may come apart.) The main varieties are those closed by stapling and more expensive self-adhesive holders. They are available in 10 sizes: 17.5, 20, 22.5, 25, 27.5, 30, 32.5, 35, 37.5 and 39.5 mm. They do not protect against condensation, but they do a good job protecting from fingerprints, falling and bumping into other coins and the plastic is normally safe. You can write on the cartons, so the coin and the information stay together. Coin dealers in Iraq may have them.

You can store the cartons in album pages, which I recommend for self-adhesive cartons. Stapled cartons can be stored anywhere. In the US, nails and screws are sometimes sold in boxes that are just the right size for coin cartons. If you decide to use self-adhesive and cannot find them in Iraq, send a PM with your questions to Bimat. He has much experience buying them by mail.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline rajiv

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Re: Storing coins
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2016, 05:42:26 AM »
Those 5x5 cm (2x2 inch) coin bags could be safe, but I have had bad experience with them. Maybe older ones are still around and used for sending coins by mail.

Coin cartons have the same size as the coin bags. You can see what they look like here. You fold them around the coin and close them with staples (don't look so nice) or glue (may come apart.) The main varieties are those closed by stapling and more expensive self-adhesive holders. They are available in 10 sizes: 17.5, 20, 22.5, 25, 27.5, 30, 32.5, 35, 37.5 and 39.5 mm. They do not protect against condensation, but they do a good job protecting from fingerprints, falling and bumping into other coins and the plastic is normally safe. You can write on the cartons, so the coin and the information stay together. Coin dealers in Iraq may have them.

You can store the cartons in album pages, which I recommend for self-adhesive cartons. Stapled cartons can be stored anywhere. In the US, nails and screws are sometimes sold in boxes that are just the right size for coin cartons. If you decide to use self-adhesive and cannot find them in Iraq, send a PM with your questions to Bimat. He has much experience buying them by mail.

Peter
hello fig leaf sir , how to protect and store 35-40 years old new copper-nickel coins . i have many republic india coins UNC but they are not protected and stored professionally . it contains many commemorative coins and definitive coins so i want to store them in proper manner . right now i have placed them in small plastic pouches but i dont think they will be safe there for long as the quantity is large around 2000 coins . kindly guide me .

Offline Bimat

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Storing coins
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2016, 07:59:57 AM »
hello fig leaf sir , how to protect and store 35-40 years old new copper-nickel coins . i have many republic india coins UNC but they are not protected and stored professionally . it contains many commemorative coins and definitive coins so i want to store them in proper manner . right now i have placed them in small plastic pouches but i dont think they will be safe there for long as the quantity is large around 2000 coins . kindly guide me .

If you want to store them all in coin holders, then stapled variety coin holders is the best option. They are available easily and cheap too (less than ₹2 per holder). Be very careful while buying them, many dealers sell bad quality holders which damage coins badly.

If budget for holders is not an issue, then self adhesive holders is also a good option. They are expensive (typically ₹10 per holder) and they are not available in India (*). You have to import them from Europe/US, which explains their high cost.

As Peter said, I'd be happy to help if anyone needs assistance in buying self adhesive holders. Just drop me a PM and I'll help as much as I can. 8)

Aditya

(*): There's one dealer in India who manufactures these locally, but my experience with them is not good. Not recommended!
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline dheer

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Re: Storing coins
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2016, 09:24:59 AM »
The optimal way is coin flips as suggested by Peter and Aditya. They are cheap, for the stapled variety... Best invest in a flat clinch stapler... Bit difficult to find... Large stationary store should have it ... Use colored stapler pins than normal....

Once you do this for most of coins, you can store these in shoe  boxes or any other such boxes....
Also buy coin bags,

Then get to buying archival grade paper envelope...
« Last Edit: July 17, 2016, 01:28:43 PM by dheer »
http://coinsofrepublicindia.blogspot.in
A guide on Republic India Coins & Currencies

Offline aws22

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Re: Storing coins
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2016, 01:02:09 PM »
Thank you Peter, you seem to favor the 2x2 cartons which I do not like because once you staple them, you can longer take further action on the coins such as inspecting or photographing them. You do not get the feel of the coin once it is stapled and not being touched. I use coin capsules for my uncirculated and very rare coins, it gives them great protection but they are relatively expensive.
Anyway, it seems that the 2x2 cartons are more feasible to use. They are not available in Iraq but I can still get them from US or UK through friends.

Maythem
Coin collecting has a curious name. It is also called the "Hobby of Kings".

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Storing coins
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2016, 02:06:44 PM »
If you take the stapled variety, you can easily take the coin out again. Just use a small knife to bend the staples' legs and push them back through the carton. The self-adhesives must normally be torn to take out the coin. With a sharp eye, you can put new staples in the old holes. Make sure the staples do not touch the coin. Replace rusty staples.

There are few alternatives. I haven't mentioned the plastic coin cabinet yet. It is relatively expensive but safe. It will not protect against condensation. Its major inconveniences are that either you must store the coins by size or they take a lot of place and information is easily separated from the coin. Their advantage is that the coins can be handled easily (beware, also by grandchildren!)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline rajiv

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Re: Storing coins
« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2016, 08:03:27 PM »
If you take the stapled variety, you can easily take the coin out again. Just use a small knife to bend the staples' legs and push them back through the carton. The self-adhesives must normally be torn to take out the coin. With a sharp eye, you can put new staples in the old holes. Make sure the staples do not touch the coin. Replace rusty staples.

There are few alternatives. I haven't mentioned the plastic coin cabinet yet. It is relatively expensive but safe. It will not protect against condensation. Its major inconveniences are that either you must store the coins by size or they take a lot of place and information is easily separated from the coin. Their advantage is that the coins can be handled easily (beware, also by grandchildren!)

Peter
thank you all , bimat ji  dheer ji and fig leaf ji  , seniors here are kind and helpful .

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Storing coins
« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2016, 10:11:20 PM »
Paper will also often contain chemicals that react with metals.

I use acid-free paper 2x2s and haven't had a problem. I avoid plastic of all kinds because it's not always obvious which plastics are relatively inert and which cause the coins to go green. The disadvantage of having to remove the coin from the holder in order to view it is outweighed by the reliability of the material (and the fact you can write on it).