Author Topic: telephone tokens  (Read 28806 times)

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Offline Afrasi

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Re: Telephone Token (1980) from Pakistan
« Reply #15 on: January 04, 2013, 01:04:28 AM »
Here is a square one from India sized exactly like 5-Paisa-coin.

Offline Mackie

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Re: Telephone Tokens
« Reply #16 on: January 04, 2013, 05:12:52 AM »
I have an Indian test token that from memory I thought the same until I got it out, I find a different type of scalloped edge, brass 22.9mm. I.P. & T. for Indian Posts And Telegraphs Department. A title that perhaps is out of date?

Test tokens were used by technicians for testing public telephones when repairs were made.

I bought the same Indian test token last week for a dollar. Can somebody tell me the mintage of this test token as this seller is listing at least one token every week from past one year?


Aditya,

I remember almost 2 years back when I had started collecting this Pakistani token was available with a seller for 100 bucks. Last year it was available for 150 bucks but no one bought it for quite sometime. Last week same token was on bidding and last when I had checked the bidding had went up to 250 bucks. I think it clearly shows the increase in demand. :)
Warm Regards,
Mackie

Offline malj1

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Re: Telephone Tokens
« Reply #17 on: January 04, 2013, 05:51:38 AM »
I bought the same Indian test token last week for a dollar. Can somebody tell me the mintage of this test token as this seller is listing at least one token every week from past one year?

There would have been quite a lot issued, each technician would need to be issued with at least a dozen I should imagine, probably more. How can we find out? does anyone know a retired employee? Maybe a retired technician is selling his unused items as is done here - old phones etc on eBay.

Or, I note there is no impressed number on my piece above, perhaps these are an unissued remainder.
Malcolm
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paisepagal

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Re: Telephone Token (1980) from Pakistan
« Reply #18 on: January 04, 2013, 06:07:49 AM »
I have an Indian test token that from memory I thought the same until I got it out, I find a different type of scalloped edge, brass 22.9mm. I.P. & T. for Indian Posts And Telegraphs Department. A title that perhaps is out of date?
Test tokens were used by technicians for testing public telephones when repairs were made.

Still referred to as such....I recall passing by their HQ which is between Churchgate Station and Flora Fountain (to the left if coming from Churchgate). Though it is indeed an outdated notion

Offline Mackie

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Re: Telephone Tokens
« Reply #19 on: January 04, 2013, 06:24:23 AM »

Or, I note there is no impressed number on my piece above, perhaps these are an unissued remainder.

That was actually my next question - All the tokens that he is selling now don't have that impressed number on them. I guess you are right, these pieces could be the unissued remainder or may be plain fakes.

Let me contact the seller and try to find out more about this token. Will keep you all updated.
Warm Regards,
Mackie

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Telephone Tokens
« Reply #20 on: January 04, 2013, 08:23:01 AM »
On the subject of test tokens, a few weeks ago I posted some information I gleaned from Tradera about Swedish test coins that were used at a specific point in time, when public payphones were all upgraded to new equipment.

Offline malj1

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Re: Telephone Tokens
« Reply #21 on: January 04, 2013, 08:37:44 AM »
Yes that  is very useful information especially with those numbers referring to district and areas but I doubt the same numbering scheme applies elsewhere as the numbers are much larger, although of course India too is much larger.

Here is a rare Australian token numbered 5463 for the Postmaster Generals Department which after several name changes is now Telstra. This is penny size in copper, blank reverse.

I have not seen enough of these to come to any conclusion re numbers.
Malcolm
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Offline FosseWay

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Re: Telephone Tokens
« Reply #22 on: January 04, 2013, 09:01:21 AM »
Just a wild stab in the dark: could high numbers refer to a member of staff rather than a location? If a given telephone engineer was issued with so many test tokens numbered from x to y it would be relatively easy to hold him responsible for their safe return when he'd done his testing. Conversely if he lost one and it later turned up in the belly of a telephone having been used by someone who found it, the chain of events and location of responsibility for the loss could be determined.

Something I haven't yet grasped though, with either these Indian pieces that clearly mimic circulation coins or the Swedish tioöringar, is why it wasn't easier for the engineer just to use a coin? That way he could be absolutely sure the apparatus worked. He could also have used a range of ages/metals of coin to reflect what was in circulation at the time. (In 1953 in Sweden there would have been both silver and Cu-Ni 10-öringar in circulation and I don't know whether both could be used in the same phone slot.)

Many of the coin-operated machines in the UK would have benefited from more exhaustive testing with 5p and 10p coins in particular, as they often just get spat out. No doubt they were tested with something akin to a coin but it didn't have the range of variations in thickness that the real things have.

Offline malj1

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Re: Telephone Tokens
« Reply #23 on: January 04, 2013, 09:41:41 AM »
Yes I too had been thinking it could possibly relate to the technicians number. The tokens were so that cash did not need to be used; the post office for instance would have to hand out a huge total of cash  to cover the whole country. The technician himself would be averse to using his own pennies which had a much bigger value that we realise today. In the days I remember when this penny was in use the public telephone here only took pennies. In fact just two pennies until decimalisation in 1966 when they became redundant. I have never heard of any test pieces used here since then. Seemingly though it appears they must now use cash as I have never heard of any later tokens, likewise with Britain with 5p and 10p coins - no tokens appear to be used, if there are they must be very closely monitored!

The multicoin phones came later, here the tech had to check spring pressures etc. I have an equipment handbook but it gives no further details that I can grasp.

This passage however is interesting with some detail of putting in and taking out of coins.
Malcolm
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Offline malj1

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Re: Telephone Tokens
« Reply #24 on: January 04, 2013, 09:55:36 AM »
The multicoin phones came later... of course these were automatic - I lived in a manual area! - we went automatic in 1963.

Here is a bit about springs and the weight of three pennies.  8)
Malcolm
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Offline Mackie

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Re: Telephone Tokens
« Reply #25 on: January 04, 2013, 11:29:08 AM »
Spoke to the seller who is selling Indian Post & Telegraph token on ebay and according to him these tokens are genuine. He had purchased these tokens with no impressed number from a post office in Ahmedabad. He had purchased a packet of around 300 tokens. He also mentioned that he purchased the tokens with the impressed number directly from a retired official of postal Department.
Warm Regards,
Mackie

Offline malj1

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Re: Telephone Tokens
« Reply #26 on: January 04, 2013, 11:42:41 AM »
That is good news that you have got confirmation from the seller.

So in that case they could well be an unissued remainder and, as I suggested above, those with a number are from a retired employee.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline Mackie

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Re: Telephone Tokens
« Reply #27 on: January 04, 2013, 11:49:48 AM »
Yes you are absolutely correct, malj1. That's exactly what the seller informed me. The tokens with the impressed number are used tokens issued to employees and the rest are unissued remainder. According to him the used tokens (limited numbers) obviously command a premium around 350 INR a piece and the unissued tokens (available in bulk) would be around 75 INR a piece.
Warm Regards,
Mackie

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Telephone Tokens
« Reply #28 on: January 04, 2013, 01:31:19 PM »
Indian Test tokens correspond to 10 Paise KM"24 in copper-nickel and KM#26 in Nickel Brass. They have 8 scallops.
Pakista token corresponds to KM#20 and has 12 scallops.

Offline Bimat

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Telephone Tokens
« Reply #29 on: January 04, 2013, 02:55:47 PM »
This is yet another excellent and highly informative thread. 8)

The only telephone token I have is the most common Italian one.. ;)

Aditya
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