Author Topic: Cleaning a 1936 Quarter Anna  (Read 2481 times)

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Offline Vivek

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Cleaning a 1936 Quarter Anna
« on: November 26, 2011, 06:31:08 AM »
Here is Mine one...bit worn..
Vivek

Offline Md. Shariful Islam

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Cleaning a 1936 Quarter Anna
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2011, 06:52:17 AM »
Here is Mine one...bit worn..
Vivek

And is it harshly cleaned Vivek. I see hair lines on the reverse from its pic.

Islam

Offline Vivek

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Cleaning a 1936 Quarter Anna
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2011, 06:57:34 AM »
Yes Islam..
still in Learning phases....I usually clea with powder called "Pitambari"(used to clean copper) with soft tooth brush for copper coins...
Need to find another way ???
Vivek

Offline Prosit

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Cleaning a 1936 Quarter Anna
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2011, 06:59:11 AM »
The catalog shows this series to range from 1912-1936 and the 1936 (c) with a mintage of 227,501,000 pieces makes it the
most numerous in the series.  However, the only 1/4 Anna I have is a different series and dated 1940. I'd be happy with a 1936 for the type.
Dale

paisepagal

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Cleaning a 1936 Quarter Anna
« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2011, 07:07:25 AM »
Yes Islam..
still in Learning phases....I usually clea with powder called "Pitambari"(used to clean copper) with soft tooth brush for copper coins...
Need to find another way ???
Vivek

I'd not be doing that if i were you. You want to make sure you have original lustre. But if you can personally somehow look beyond the scratches and the fake lustre as a result of what you have done, then you are good. But it certainly won't make your coin more valuable, rather the reverse

Offline Md. Shariful Islam

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Cleaning a 1936 Quarter Anna
« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2011, 07:13:14 AM »
And is it harshly cleaned Vivek. I see hair lines on the reverse from its pic.

Islam
I have learned from WoC to sink coppers in Olive oil (I use mustard oil) for a few days. The patinas will automatically be relieved from the coin.

Islam
« Last Edit: November 26, 2011, 08:45:53 AM by Tanka »

Offline Vivek

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Cleaning a 1936 Quarter Anna
« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2011, 07:38:37 AM »
I'd not be doing that if i were you. You want to make sure you have original lustre. But if you can personally somehow look beyond the scratches and the fake lustre as a result of what you have done, then you are good. But it certainly won't make your coin more valuable, rather the reverse

Thanks for your feedback ..
Some I hate dirty coins...first thing I do is clean them >:(...need to learn..cleaning process more thoroughly..
Vivek

paisepagal

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Cleaning a 1936 Quarter Anna
« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2011, 11:41:07 AM »
Thanks for your feedback ..
Some I hate dirty coins...first thing I do is clean them >:(...need to learn..cleaning process more thoroughly..
Vivek

I did the same thing as a kid...but i had valid excuses...I was only eight, the coins were gifted to me and I didn't have forums like WOC to read up on. My neighbour, uncle Junggu saw what I had done and lectured my ear off it. But he was absolutely right. By polishing the coins the way you did, you have not only defaced these coins, you have unintentionally tried to rub away their history!. How can you possibly expect a coin that had circulated over 70 years ago to look brand new ??. Cleaning is only done to remove EXTERNAL dirt, dunk and patina; not oxidation which is an absolutely normal process for circulated coins.

If you want shiny coins, then pay through your nose and buy out original lustre coins like other collectors do. I definitely don't intend to berate you and infact thank you for posting your polished coins (we are doing a service to others here). It is all too familiar how people who think they are collectors have a total disregard for the historical significance of old coins they perceive as common. Hopefully people will read threads like these and realise they are destroying their collection 

Offline Figleaf

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Cleaning a 1936 Quarter Anna
« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2011, 04:12:49 PM »
Hello Vivek. Paisepagal has a good point. Thank you for posting the coin here. I hope it is a valuable discussion and reading item.

Let's sit back and think why we want a coin in our collection. For me, the most important reasons are to conserve the coin (I am only a temporary warden of the coins in my collection, but I can preserve them for a while), to study them and to use them as reference, e.g. when I am asked to judge a suspicious coin. I don't need an unc coin to do this. What I need is a coin on which all the details are clear. In fact, in the case of rare coins, I will even accept coins with incomplete detail.

Therefore, my purpose when cleaning a coin is to change it from a coin where the details are not all clear to one with clear details: I want to remove the dirt that is obscuring the coin only. While doing so, I want the coin to remain as little changed as possible. I want to be hard on dirt, soft on coins. Not impossible, not easy.

Now consider the coin you cleaned. No more dirt. Good. However, your cleaning method also removed detail. Worse, as Tanka pointed out, it made many small scratches. Not so good. Your coins never get a better grade from cleaning. A shiny coin is not necessarily an unc coin. There must be a better method.

The better method depends on the character of the dirt and the metal of the coin. One extreme is that you just rub them softly with a soft cloth. Another extreme for coppers and bronzes is using prolonged baths in olive oil (I just cleaned a batch of medieval Chinese coins by keeping them in olive oil for almost half a year) and a wooden toothpick for stubborn pieces of dirt.

So when you decide to clean (many coins don't need cleaning,) if you have doubts on the method, just post the coin and we'll be happy to chat away and come up with a variety of opinions and thoughts.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Vivek

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Cleaning a 1936 Quarter Anna
« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2011, 05:49:50 PM »
Thanks to all for detailed information..
Surely I will try olive oil next time...I have few more coins...
Vivek