Author Topic: British Empire & C/W: a parade of pre-decimal denominations  (Read 335308 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: British Empire & C/W: a parade of pre-decimal denominations
« Reply #30 on: December 01, 2011, 09:35:53 PM »


Fiji's sixpence was another one to portray an animal: a turtle, by Percy Metcalfe, the same artist who designed Ireland's famous barnyard coin series.



Australia's coat of arms features stylised animals, but the reverse of New Zealand's sixpence carries a lifelike portrayal of a huia bird.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2017, 01:25:14 AM by <k> »

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Re: British Empire & C/W: a parade of pre-decimal denominations
« Reply #31 on: December 01, 2011, 09:38:41 PM »
Here is Mr Metcalfe's famous wolfhound on the Irish sixpence. With a weight of 4.54 g and a diameter of 20.8 mm, it was the largest sixpence I know of.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 02:54:23 PM by <k> »

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Re: British Empire & C/W: a parade of pre-decimal denominations
« Reply #32 on: December 01, 2011, 09:42:00 PM »
Southern Rhodesia depicted a pair of crossed African axes on its sixpence.

Rhodesia and Nyasaland featured a watchful lioness.

A flame lily appeared on the Rhodesian sixpence, which was also denominated as 5 cents in the new decimal system.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 02:56:05 PM by <k> »

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Re: British Empire & C/W: a parade of pre-decimal denominations
« Reply #33 on: December 01, 2011, 09:44:51 PM »
The sixpence of independent Zambia depicts a morning glory flower.

Zambia's second sixpence of 1966 loses the coat of arms and portrays President Kaunda instead.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2017, 08:58:56 AM by <k> »

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Re: British Empire & C/W: a parade of pre-decimal denominations
« Reply #34 on: December 01, 2011, 09:47:26 PM »


Nearby Malawi depicts President Banda and his political party's symbol, a cockerel.

 
« Last Edit: July 05, 2017, 07:24:13 PM by <k> »

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Re: British Empire & C/W: a parade of pre-decimal denominations
« Reply #35 on: December 01, 2011, 09:51:19 PM »
On an agricultural theme, Gambia's sixpence featured peanuts.

Nigeria's sixpence of 1959 depicted cocoa beans. It had a diameter of 17.5mm, around 2mm smaller than normal for a sixpence.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2017, 09:11:47 AM by <k> »

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Re: British Empire & C/W: a parade of pre-decimal denominations
« Reply #36 on: December 01, 2011, 09:54:57 PM »
Ghana's sixpence is, I believe, the smallest sixpence, weighing 2.2g and with a diameter of 16.5mm.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 03:02:03 PM by <k> »

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Re: British Empire & C/W: a parade of pre-decimal denominations
« Reply #37 on: December 01, 2011, 09:56:26 PM »
New Guinea had the world's only sixpence with a central hole, but then all its coins were holed. Diameter: 18.7mm.
« Last Edit: August 25, 2017, 07:03:58 PM by <k> »

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Re: British Empire & C/W: a parade of pre-decimal denominations
« Reply #38 on: December 01, 2011, 10:05:27 PM »
Biafra also issued a sixpence after it briefly broke away from Nigeria.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 03:05:03 PM by <k> »

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Re: British Empire & C/W: a parade of pre-decimal denominations
« Reply #39 on: December 02, 2011, 11:10:22 PM »
The shilling was part of the now defunct pound, shillings and pence system. The British exported this system to various parts of their empire. The lower the denomination, the more likely the different coins were to show variations, as can be observed in the threepences particularly, but the shillings were fairly uniform acroos the empire in terms of size, shape, weight and colour.

The silver and cupro-nickel shillings of the UK and the various countries of the Empire that used it were usually around 23.5mm in diameter. If any shilling I am displaying falls outside that range, I will say so. My focus is not primarily on the UK itself (the British and English shillings have far too long a history for a single topic), but on the Commonwealth and Empire, which means I will be concentrating overwhelmingly on the 20th century. However, I will start off with a Victorian shilling, in order to compare it with a shilling that was used by a country that was not in the Empire (though it was conquered by the British later) but which used the pounds shilling and pence system nevertheless: the Transvaal Republic.










Notice how both coins portray a tied wreath.

 
« Last Edit: July 05, 2017, 06:15:39 PM by <k> »

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Re: British Empire & C/W: a parade of pre-decimal denominations
« Reply #40 on: December 02, 2011, 11:17:22 PM »
The Transvaal Republic was eventually defeated, and its territory was merged into the Union of South Africa.

South Africa's first shilling, of 1923 and 1924, had a inner ring on the reverse design, and the denomination was shown as "1 SHILLING 1".

As of 1926 onwards, the ring was lost and the denomination changed to simply "SHILLING".

From 1951 until 1960, the end of the coin's life, the denomination was "1s".
« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 03:08:47 PM by <k> »

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Re: British Empire & C/W: a parade of pre-decimal denominations
« Reply #41 on: December 02, 2011, 11:21:29 PM »
Two other shillings with similar designs are the English-themed shilling of Elizabeth II, showing the three lions of England, and the Cyprus shilling, with a somewhat similar design of two heraldic lions.

The Cyprus shilling was divided into 9 piastres - not 12 pence.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 03:10:25 PM by <k> »

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Re: British Empire & C/W: a parade of pre-decimal denominations
« Reply #42 on: December 02, 2011, 11:27:50 PM »
From 1910 to 1936 Australia also used a heraldic design on its shilling, though its animal supporters look far more realistic than the heraldic lions.

In 1938 the coinage was updated, and the shilling now depicted a prize Merino ram.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 03:11:21 PM by <k> »

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Re: British Empire & C/W: a parade of pre-decimal denominations
« Reply #43 on: December 02, 2011, 11:33:07 PM »
New Zealand used the same reverse design through the life of its shilling, from 1933 to 1965. It depicts a Maori warrior.

After decimalisation, New Zealand's 10 cents coin was doubly-denominated, as 10 cents and one shilling. Strangely, none of the other decimal coins with a pre-decimal counterpart was given a double denomination.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 03:12:35 PM by <k> »

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Re: British Empire & C/W: a parade of pre-decimal denominations
« Reply #44 on: December 02, 2011, 11:38:45 PM »
The famous Zimbabwe bird appeared on the reverse of the Southern Rhodesian shilling.

The reverse of the shilling of Rhodesia and Nyasaland depicts a sable antelope.

Like the New Zealand 10 cents of the 1960s, the 1964 10 cents of Rhodesia was also doubly-denominated.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 03:17:39 PM by <k> »