Author Topic: Local short sets supplemented by overseas full sets  (Read 4034 times)

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Offline <k>

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Local short sets supplemented by overseas full sets
« on: November 12, 2011, 12:35:09 AM »
In another topic, Channel Island predecimal SHORT sets, I have already mentioned the fact that, immediately before decimalisation in 1971, both Jersey and Guernsey had two low denomination local coins circulating alongside a full set of UK coinage:

1] Jersey: local coins were one twelfth of a shilling and one fourth of a shilling, equivalent to a predecimal UK penny and threepence.

2] Guernsey: local coins were a Guernsey threepence, and also 8 doubles, which was equivalent to a predecimal UK penny.

Immediately prior to decimalisation, the full UK set of coinage was 1d, 3d, 6d, one shilling, two shillings (florin), and a half crown (two shillings and sixpence).



Jamaica had a similar situation, prior to adopting the Jamaican dollar in 1969, when a Jamaican halfpenny and penny circulated alongside a full set of UK coinage.



British Guiana, prior to adopting the West Indian / British East Caribbean Territories dollar in 1955, had a similar situation, where a four pence coin circulated alongside a full set of UK coinage. A four pence coin no longer existed in the UK at that time, apart from the Maundy coin, which was only used by royalty for ceremonial occasions.



Was this a purely British phenomenon, or can anybody think of other situations in which a short set of local coins was supplemented by overseas coins of the SAME currency system?
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Local short sets supplemented by overseas full sets
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2011, 12:13:46 AM »
The coins of the Netherlands Indies (now Indonesia) were supplemented with regular Dutch coins of 1/2, 1 and 2-1/2 gulden. In fact, practically all half gulden coins ended up in the Netherlands Indies. Similarly, coins of Curaçao/Netherlands Antilles circulated alongside regular Dutch coins. In both cases, the situation lasted until the second world war.

Peter
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Offline andyg

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Re: Local short sets supplemented by overseas full sets
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2011, 12:21:10 AM »
Did British copper circulate alongside the NZ silver issues?
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Offline <k>

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Re: Local short sets supplemented by overseas full sets
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2011, 01:32:08 AM »
The coins of the Netherlands Indies (now Indonesia) were supplemented with regular Dutch coins of 1/2, 1 and 2-1/2 gulden. In fact, practically all half gulden coins ended up in the Netherlands Indies.

Peter

Checking the catalogues, it seems that colonial coins only went up to ¼ gulden. Numismaster lists a gulden and a 2½ gulden, both dated 1943, under Netherlands East Indies, but they just look like regular Dutch coins and don't give the colonial country name. Numista says of the 2½ gulden: "Same coin as Netherlands KM#165 except that there is no palm tree at the bottom right of the crest".
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Local short sets supplemented by overseas full sets
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2011, 01:38:03 AM »
All of that is correct. Values circulating upward from 1/4 gulden were regular Dutch. The 1 and 2-1/2 Gulden with mintmark palm tree were struck in the US during the second world war. They could by definition not circulate in the Netherlands, but technically, their specifications were the same as the pre-war coins.

Peter
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Offline <k>

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Re: Local short sets supplemented by overseas full sets
« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2011, 01:40:56 AM »
The coins of the Netherlands Indies (now Indonesia) were supplemented with regular Dutch coins of 1/2, 1 and 2-1/2 gulden. In fact, practically all half gulden coins ended up in the Netherlands Indies. Similarly, coins of Curaçao/Netherlands Antilles circulated alongside regular Dutch coins. In both cases, the situation lasted until the second world war.

Peter

Netherlands Antilles apparently had no coins of their own until the 1950s, so I assume you mean Curaçao - a name I have never heard pronounced, but I gather it would sound like "cure a show" in English.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Local short sets supplemented by overseas full sets
« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2011, 01:43:56 AM »
Did British copper circulate alongside the NZ silver issues?

I assume that must have been the case, since the first NZ ½d and 1d were dated 1940 (though they were actually issued in 1939, according to forum member translateltd), but the rest of the NZ set was first issued in 1933.
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Local short sets supplemented by overseas full sets
« Reply #7 on: November 13, 2011, 02:26:09 AM »
Curaçao is the largest island of the Netherlands Antilles. I guess my dear compatriots though that you need a correct name for the Dutch (like the Netherlands) and a funny name for the foreigners (like Holland) ::)

You can hear how the name is pronounced by clicking on the sound link in the first sentence here.

Peter
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Local short sets supplemented by overseas full sets
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2011, 12:15:15 PM »
Even if you have never heard of the island, you may have heard about the liquor. 8) Here are three ways to pronounce the name: Dutch, Papiamento and German. http://www.forvo.com/word/curaçao/ Guess that English speakers would, if I may vary coffeetime's suggestion, say "cure a sow" ...

As for the name change, from what I know, Curaçao (the name of the biggest island) was in "colonial" times also used as a collective term that covered Bonaire, Aruba, etc. as well. Around 1950 the area got more autonomy (Eilandenregeling) and a new name which was then used for about 60 years.

Cannot add any new "short sets" though, sorry.

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: Local short sets supplemented by overseas full sets
« Reply #9 on: November 13, 2011, 12:29:35 PM »
you may have heard about the liquor.

Never had, but apparently it's also a liqueur, but never a lacquer. Dyslexics, beware!
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Offline villa66

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Re: Local short sets supplemented by overseas full sets
« Reply #10 on: November 14, 2011, 01:37:56 AM »
I first heard "Curacao" prounounced on TV documentaries or news shorts about the ill-fated British cruiser of that name.

v.

translateltd

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Re: Local short sets supplemented by overseas full sets
« Reply #11 on: November 14, 2011, 09:53:16 AM »
I assume that must have been the case, since the first NZ ½d and 1d were dated 1940 (though they were actually issued in 1939, according to forum member translateltd), but the rest of the NZ set was first issued in 1933.

Yes, and Australian issues were used here too.


Offline <k>

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Re: Local short sets supplemented by overseas full sets
« Reply #12 on: November 14, 2011, 01:24:46 PM »
Yes, and Australian issues were used here too.



But for how long after NZ started issuing its own coinage in 1933? Until decimalisation? Apparently the creation of New Zealand coinage was partly due to "coin-smuggling" of silver coins from NZ to Australia and the UK. Presumably the coins being smuggled were either British or Australian - or both? I've never really understood the economic reasons behind this smuggling - sounds like an interesting story.
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