Author Topic: Any information about this Token ?  (Read 2035 times)

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Offline lusomosa

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Any information about this Token ?
« on: January 27, 2008, 09:39:27 PM »
Greetings to all,
I saw this Token from my brother-in-law . It is a "Bread Token" from 1861. Made for a church in Amsterdam.
Does someone have any information about this type of tokens ? were they used for bread only or were there other tokens for other types of food.
Why is there a whole it this token ? Any idea is welcome.
It is about as big as a one Euro coin.

Thanks already,

LP

Online Figleaf

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Re: Any information about this Token ?
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2008, 10:40:19 PM »
The date 1861 is not the real date, but the date the organization was founded.

There are several varieties of this token. The bronze and silver variety are the rarest. There are three zinc varieties: with four breads on the table, with two breads and with a central hole. The hole may have been a sign of differentiation of old and new medals. The holes come in different sizes.

The legend on the side with the sitting lady with lamb, VERGENOEGD EN DANKBAAR means content and grateful. The legend on the other side is BROODPENNING DER HERV. DIACONIE TE AMSTERDAM - bread token of the reformed deaconry of Amsterdam.

Around 1880-1920 socialism (at the time still united with communism) became a political force to be reckoned with. They agitated in favour of the poor, which became another point of contention with the church, traditionally (but not always successfully) the protector of the poor. Socialists started cooperative bakeries and dairies, where the poor would be able to buy cheap and wholesome food. The medals could be distributed and exchanged for cheaper bread, free bread or a share in the profit of the cooperative. The churches responded angrily. The higher clergy declared socialism sinful. The lower clergy sometimes acted in direct competition with the cooperatives, by reviving their own bread distribution system. This medal is an example of the latter in a protestant church. Most other bread and milk medals are cooperative in nature. Since secularization worked against the church, it could only lose this battle. In 1891, the catholic church recognized the ends of socialism as its own, creating the christian democratic movement.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline lusomosa

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Re: Any information about this Token ?
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2008, 11:01:47 PM »
Thanks a lot Peter for your reply, I have still a lot to read about Dutch society after the beginning of the Industrial revolution.

Your reply gives me the set to try and find-out more about the time.

LP

Online Figleaf

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Re: Any information about this Token ?
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2008, 11:19:14 PM »
See this thread for a Belgian socialist token.

For North American members: after the first world war, the working class movement split into a communist and a socialist branch. While communism lives on in very few countries only, socialism remains a mainstream political movement in democratic countries (as well as an abused term in some dictatorships). The common North American terminology, confounding socialism and communism, does not adequately describe the situation.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.