Milestones in the decimal coinage of the Isle of Man

Started by <k>, October 14, 2011, 07:26:54 PM

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<k>

#45


A cushag flower graces the five pence coin.
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<k>

#46


A four-horned Loghtan ram is depicted on the reverse of the ten pence.
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<k>

#47


Three herring are shown on the reverse of the 20 pence coin.
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<k>

#48


The reverse of the fifty pence piece depicts yet another Viking ship.

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<k>

#49


In 1985 the UK introduced a new portrait of Queen Elizabeth II on the obverse of its circulation coins. The old design by Arnold Machin was replaced by a new effigy by Raphael Maklouf. In the same year, the Isle of Man also adopted the Maklouf portrait, seen above. Notice the four small triskeles that have been added to the design, two at the top and two at the bottom. The Isle of Man last used the Maklouf portrait in 1997.
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<k>

#50


In 1986 the town series of one pound coins came to an end, so in 1987 the Isle of Man issued a one-off design depicting a Viking on horseback.

Interestingly, the words "Ellan Vannin" are included in the legend. Ellan Vannin is the Manx Gaelic name for the Isle of Man. Manx was spoken in former times on the island, but it is no longer a living language, and the last native speaker on the island died in 1974. This was the first coin to bear the island's name in Manx.
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<k>

#51
1988: NEW DESIGN SERIES.

In 1988 the Isle of Man issued a new series of reverse designs for its circulation coins, entitled "Technology on the Isle of Man".
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<k>

#52


The penny shows a precision lathe, superimposed on a cog wheel.
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<k>

#53


The two pence design represents Manx arts and craft.

An ancient stone cross with a Hiberno-Norse ring chain and animal carving motif forms the background to this design.

At the centre of the cross is a Manx jug, set upon a potter's wheel.

The upper arm of the cross shows knitting, while the side arms feature a weaver's bobbin with a reel of yarn, and a woodcarver's mallet and chisel.
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<k>

#54


The five pence portrays a windsurfer.
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<k>

#55


The ten pence depicts a portcullis above an outline of the Isle of Man, against a background of the globe.

This symbolises the city of Douglas, the financial centre of the Isle of Man.
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<k>

#56


The 20 pence design introduced in 1988 showed a combined harvester. This design was used from 1988 to 1995. Until the end of 1992, this design appeared on a normal planchet. In 1993 the Isle of Man came into line with the UK and issued a 20p coin with an extra-wide rim.
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<k>

#57


The fifty pence in the technology series illustrates a personal computer.
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<k>

#58


A cell phone / mobile phone appears on the pound coin.
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<k>

#59


In 1992 a new reverse design for the ten pence was released, replacing the former technology design. It showed a version of the triskele. This coin was issued from 1992 to 1995 inclusive. The legend, QUOCUNQUE JECERIS STABIT, which translates as "Wherever you throw it, it will stand", refers to the triskele.

In 1992 the UK had introduced a smaller and lighter version of its ten pence coin, and this Manx coin was the local counterpart to that, being smaller and lighter than the technology ten pence that it superseded. As in the UK, the old larger ten pence coins were demonetised during the course of 1993.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.