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Australian Commemorative WW2 6d - rejected designs

Started by <k>, October 07, 2011, 12:16:03 PM

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<k>

In 1940 the Australian government had the idea of introducing a new reverse design for the sixpence in order to commemorate Australia's entry into the Second World War. George Kruger-Gray, the Royal Mint's most prominent artist of the day, was asked to work on the project and produce some designs for consideration.

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<k>

Kruger-Gray produced three designs for consideration. The simplest of these designs showed a sword and the Southern Cross.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

The second design showed "Australia drawing the sword".
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

The final design showed a female figure of Liberty, surrounded by a flight of swallows.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

In 1942, for reasons not given, the Australian government dropped the proposal, and no new sixpence design was issued. George Kruger-Gray died in 1943.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

Thanks, coffeetime. Yet another series of fun designs. The third one with what you call Liberty is confusing. The winged cap is an attribute of Hermes, who has a lot of functions, none of them war-like. However, Hermes has no breasts. Swallows, usually symbols of spring, are sometimes used as divine messengers, in particular by Hermes when he was spying on people for the gods.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

Quote from: Figleaf on October 09, 2011, 12:28:15 AM
The third one with what you call Liberty is confusing. The winged cap is an attribute of Hermes, who has a lot of functions, none of them war-like. However, Hermes has no breasts. Swallows, usually symbols of spring, are sometimes used as divine messengers, in particular by Hermes when he was spying on people for the gods.

Peter

Yes, as regards "Liberty", I quote only what is stated in the documents. I find the designs interesting from a historical point of view, but somehow they just don't resonate with me, so I am neither surprised nor disappointed that they were dropped. They are way belowthe standard of Kruger-Gray's best work.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

villa66

Quote from: coffeetime on October 09, 2011, 12:39:29 AM
...I find the designs interesting from a historical point of view, but somehow they just don't resonate with me, so I am neither surprised nor disappointed that they were dropped....
I couldn't agree more. Interesting to know, however. Thanks.

:) v.

Prosit

I too find the images intreging but they don't quite make it.  The wings on liberty bother me for one thing.
Dale


Quote from: villa66 on October 09, 2011, 02:05:39 AM
I couldn't agree more. Interesting to know, however. Thanks.

:) v.