Author Topic: Electrolysis - Before and after.  (Read 6002 times)

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Ansari

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Electrolysis - Before and after.
« on: September 15, 2011, 06:30:48 AM »
Hello,

Recently discussed about electrolysis as a coin cleaning tool.
Applied on some recently acquired coins here is the result.

Before Cleaning





After cleaning



:)

Offline Md. Shariful Islam

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Re: Electrolysis - Before and after.
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2011, 11:13:13 AM »
Hmm. Gandhi jee is cleaned more than others. Did you use natural chemical electrolysis or the electrical electrolysis? Please elaborate your technique.

Islam


Ansari

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Re: Electrolysis - Before and after.
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2011, 11:29:52 AM »
Hmm. Gandhi jee is cleaned more than others. Did you use natural chemical electrolysis or the electrical electrolysis? Please elaborate your technique.

Islam



Gandhi Ji Rocks  ;D

Detail in this thread (including the link from where i learned this technique using 12 volt)
http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,9924.msg77525.html#msg77525

:)

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Electrolysis - Before and after.
« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2011, 04:09:33 PM »
Yes, the brass coin is spectacular. Your other coins are instructive. The secret of good cleaning is to consider the metal of the coin and the nature of the dirt before deciding on a method. Electrolysis is perfect for silver, unnecessary for gold and in between for other metals. It deals very effectively with organic dirt and mud, but is not effective on oxydation.

Your coppers need more treatment, as dark spots remain. The dark spots may be oxydation (it certainly seems that way on the Edwardian coin.) If so, a combination of soaking in olive oil and a hard brush with a toothbrush cut short may help. For very bad spots, you can use a wooden toothpick. This is a labour of patience; it can take months.

To get your coppers back to a natural colour, I would recommend using air pollution. Just keep them in a bad spot and wait. This can take more than a year, but this way, you can't wipe the patina off with your thumb.

Good luck.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Ansari

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Re: Electrolysis - Before and after.
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2011, 06:50:18 PM »
Yes, the brass coin is spectacular. Your other coins are instructive. The secret of good cleaning is to consider the metal of the coin and the nature of the dirt before deciding on a method. Electrolysis is perfect for silver, unnecessary for gold and in between for other metals. It deals very effectively with organic dirt and mud, but is not effective on oxydation.

Your coppers need more treatment, as dark spots remain. The dark spots may be oxydation (it certainly seems that way on the Edwardian coin.) If so, a combination of soaking in olive oil and a hard brush with a toothbrush cut short may help. For very bad spots, you can use a wooden toothpick. This is a labour of patience; it can take months.

To get your coppers back to a natural colour, I would recommend using air pollution. Just keep them in a bad spot and wait. This can take more than a year, but this way, you can't wipe the patina off with your thumb.

Good luck.

Peter


Thank you Peter for your advise..... truely needed that.

:)

Offline bruce61813

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Re: Electrolysis - Before and after.
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2012, 04:10:48 AM »
what solution are you using? NEVER use NaCL or common table salt. It allows too much current to flow and you will burn, or heat the coin up and leave a tempering heat mark.
Use something like baking soda or washing soda, or a mix of the two. It is slower, but will leave coins close to a normal color. I have had ancients that were so encrusted that there wher no identifying marks visible. A slow soda bath electrolysis bath, provided a beautiful coin, and it was not shiny bright.

Bruce

Offline goossen

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Re: Electrolysis - Before and after.
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2012, 04:47:11 AM »
Very interesting results, thanks for posting.

I've found electrolysis very useful, just be careful of not overcooking!

Offline bruce61813

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Re: Electrolysis - Before and after.
« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2012, 05:38:52 PM »
if you use a soda mix, it has a low conductivity solution, it is hard to "over cook" coins.

Bruce

Ansari

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Re: Electrolysis - Before and after.
« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2012, 05:34:10 AM »
if you use a soda mix, it has a low conductivity solution, it is hard to "over cook" coins.

Bruce

Thank you for your advise, i was using common salt, now will use soda mix only.

Offline bruce61813

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Re: Electrolysis - Before and after.
« Reply #9 on: July 12, 2012, 07:41:29 PM »
the soda mix, or just some ordinary baking soda, is the best i have found. It does take a bit longer, so it gives you more control. I work in 15 minute intervals, with a brushing every 15 minutes. That removes the surface, then the next round. But that is for the really badly crusted ancient coins.

For some "new: one or two minutes would probably do. I do not advocate using electrolysis for general cleaning, but as a last resort.
Also never for treating Bronze Disease, it does not mitigate the source of the problem, only masks it.

Bruce
 

Ansari

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Re: Electrolysis - Before and after.
« Reply #10 on: July 13, 2012, 06:05:44 AM »

Also never for treating Bronze Disease, it does not mitigate the source of the problem, only masks it.

Bruce

For this i have tried (with some surplus coins) to heat them up and suddenly dip them in cold water. After brushing they are free from the green deposit for a long period of time. Am i doing right or should i stop doing this??

Thank you

Offline bruce61813

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Re: Electrolysis - Before and after.
« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2012, 03:30:36 PM »
Bronze Disease is not just the normal green copper oxide you see on copper or coins with copper in their ally. It is a chemical attack on the tin in the bronze matrix of coins.  It is most often found i ancient coins that have been buried for a very long time. Trying to treat BD with the shock treatment method, is like trying to treat rust on your car with soapy water.

Bruce

Offline Rishabh Jain

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Re: Electrolysis - Before and after.
« Reply #12 on: September 24, 2012, 01:41:14 PM »
Here's my before and after!!!

BEFORE



AFTER

I would like to buy the Bull Anna series.

I will also buy single coins of this series.

Please message me with your price and an image of the coin/coins.

Offline bruce61813

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Re: Electrolysis - Before and after.
« Reply #13 on: September 24, 2012, 04:13:39 PM »
Nice job!

Bruce

Offline Rishabh Jain

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Re: Electrolysis - Before and after.
« Reply #14 on: September 24, 2012, 04:23:42 PM »
Nice job!

Bruce

There is a little rust (or whatever it was) still left over on the other side in one corner. Any ideas how to clean it? I tried electrolysis for 15 more minutes after posting the image of the cleaned coin.

capnbirdseye told me copper coins take a weird colour after some days. if electrolysis is used on them. Why do you thing that happens and are their ways to avoid it if it happens to this coin?
I would like to buy the Bull Anna series.

I will also buy single coins of this series.

Please message me with your price and an image of the coin/coins.