Milestones in the decimal coinage of St. Helena-Ascension

Started by <k>, September 09, 2011, 11:49:02 PM

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<k>



The reverse of the 1 penny coin.

It featured an albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga).




A yellowfin tuna was the intended design for the penny.

However, the actual depiction is that of an albacore when comparing the fins.



NOTE:

Royal Mint data claims that the fish is a yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares).

Originally a yellow fin tuna was indeed intended for the design.

However, the issued design shows an albacore tuna.

See: Royal Mint Advisory Committee Meetings of 1982.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




The 2 pence reverse featured a donkey (Equus africanus asinus).

The donkey was formerly essential for the transport of people and goods.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




The 5 pence featured a Saint Helena plover (Charadrius sanctaehelenae.)
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



A Saint Helena plover (Charadrius sanctaehelenae.)


NOTE: "Plover" rhymes with "cover" and "lover" - NOT "clover" or "over".
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The 10 pence reverse featured the arum lily (Zantedeschia aethiopica.).

This was the national flower until 2011.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




The 50 pence reverse featured the green turtle (Chelonia mydas).
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




The 1 pound coin featured a sooty tern, or "Wideawake" (Onychoprion fuscatus).

Incuse edge inscription: "COLONY OF ST HELENA".


NOTE:

Since 2006 the edge inscription reads: "ST. HELENA ISLAND".

Notice the period after "ST", which did not appear on earlier edge inscriptions.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Sooty tern in flight.


The sooty tern breeds on islands throughout the equatorial zone.

Colloquially, it is known as the wideawake tern or simply the wideawake.

This refers to its loud calls that wake the islanders in the early morning.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>







The UK adopted the new effigy of Elizabeth II by Raphael Maklouf in 1985.

St Helena-Ascension did not do so until 1991, because it issued no circulation coins from 1985 to 1990.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Obverse of the smaller 5 pence coin.


The UK reduced the size and weight of its 5 and 10 pence coins in 1990 and 1992 respectively.

St Helena-Ascension did not do so until 1998.

This was because it issued no coins in the period from 1992 to 1997.

The territory also took the opportunity to issue its own 20 pence coin in 1998.

That was sixteen years after the UK had introduced its own version.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




The 5 pence reverse design now featured Jonathan the giant tortoise.

He is a living mascot of the island and it is thought he was born circa 1832 !
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>


The 10 pence reverse featured two dolphins.


Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>




The 20 pence coin featured another national flower: the Saint Helena ebony.

Royal Mint artist and sculptor Robert Elderton produced the reverse designs of the new 5, 10 and 20 pence coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The Saint Helena ebony flower(Trochetiopsis ebenus).
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.