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Bombay Presidency: Surat Rupee

Started by Rangnath, January 18, 2008, 05:16:32 PM

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Figleaf

Good question BCN! I think the answer is that no symbolism was intended. Someone thought it'd be nice to add the crown when the dies were already prepared and aligning the addition with the design just wasn't thought of as an important issue.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

BC Numismatics

Peter,
  I think that it is an engraving error that was missed through an oversight,given how tiny the British Crown actually is.

Still,it does provide us with the clue that the coin in question was most definitely issued under British rule.

Aidan.

shariqkhan

#17
Dear Aidan,
I think Upside Down Crown on the is the mistake of  Die Maker. I saw many Indian Coins also on which some figures, numerals, pictures are inverted.

BC Numismatics

Shariq,
  That's very interesting to know.Is it listed in Krause? If not,then you should send off an email with photos to Randy Thern at thernr@krause.com .

Aidan.

shariqkhan

I have no Idea about the listing in Krause but in a new topic I am posting an interesting coin in which there is a horizontal flip of Arabic Numerals. Please check it and tell what do you think about it.

Oesho

#20
The design of the gold and silver Surat-type coins was the same for both the Bombay and Surat mint. Privy marks distinguish the mint of issue and periods.
The coins minted at the Surat mint (1800-1815) doesn't have an additional privy mark.
All privy marks are found on issues of the Bombay mint.
The privy mark of a crown is found in normal position and inverted. The inverted variety is regarded by Pridmore (p.128-129) as a die-sinkers error.


Herewith illustrated a "Surat"-mohur, Yr.46 with privy mark of a crown in normal position and star over the 'he' of Shah. This issue was struck at the Bombay mint, during the period 1825-1831.

BC Numismatics

Jan,
  Do you have any of those coins?

Aidan.

Oesho

I must admit, yes. All are part of my collection, build-up over a period of about 40 years.

Figleaf

Oesho's collection makes you silent, agape and drool, Aidan. Enjoy and learn. However, his collection is still nothing compared to what's in his head. By spreading his vast knowledge of Islamic coins, their background and history he contributes to things that would sound too pompous to sum up. I'm proud he's here. Let's use the opportunity.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.