Author Topic: Coin nicknames  (Read 15524 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Coin nicknames
« on: September 26, 2007, 06:30:34 PM »
Before the euro was introduced, most Dutch coins had one or more colourful nicknames. That's the only thing I miss about the gulden currency. Today, I only hear "dubbeltje" used from time to time for the 10 cent piece. Personally, I like using deuro for the 2 euro piece and people will always understand, but the name hasn't caught on.

Eurocent is indeed used to distinguish between "old" and "new" cents, so I expect it to disappear from the language. In France, for instance, only older people and those from the French colonies would regularly use "ancien francs", but it would also be used sometimes to impress. Some people would say things like "the house cost me 100 million" or "the house cost me 100 bricks" (both meaning a million francs or 100 million old francs). Maybe the generation now growing up and no longer suffering from memories from before the euro will bring nicknaming coins back...

Peter
« Last Edit: January 14, 2008, 11:57:03 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline a3v1

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Linguistics and nicknames
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2007, 12:54:13 AM »
@ all,
In the Netherlands the old name "stuiver" (stuyver) is commonly used for the euro 5 cent piece.
Regards,
a3v1
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Money is like body fat: If there's too much of it, it always is in the wrong places.

Offline chrisild

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Linguistics and nicknames
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2007, 01:59:02 PM »
Similarly, I have heard "Groschen" in Germany various times. Used to be the name of various coins, then (in DE) the nickname of the 10 pfennig coin, and is now (less commonly though) used for the 10 cent coin.

Problem is, in everyday life you hardly ever use such words. What costs a stuiver or a Groschen these days? And higher amounts would be expressed in euro terms: "that is four euro fifty", or just "four fifty". And nicknames for notes are AFAIK not used in German - it's just a "F?nfer" (fiver), "Zehner" (tenner), "Zwanziger" (twentier) and so on.

I like the (Spanish?) nick "Bin Laden" for the ?500 note though: Everybody knows it exists, but you hardly ever get to see one. ;)

Christian

Offline Prosit

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« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2007, 06:34:48 PM »
Don't forget the Tanner!   :)

Dale 

Offline Figleaf

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Linguistics and nicknames
« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2007, 06:49:32 PM »
Right! A tanner is a sixpence, a mag (maybe from magpie, though the coin shows another bird?) a farthing.

A sou is a 5 centimes piece in France.

Peter
« Last Edit: January 14, 2008, 11:57:53 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2007, 11:09:24 PM »
By the way, along with Bulgarian and Romanian, Irish (Gaeilge) became an official EU language on 1 January 2007. http://www.europa.eu/index_ga.htm

@Figleaf: As for the US dime, strictly speaking that is not a nick. Penny, nickel and quarter are, but "dime" is actually an official unit name.

@Martin: Again, it is up to you what names you use instead of euro and cent. Some English speakers even call the euro "eurodollar" ... oh well. Giving a currency a name, however, is hardly anything that "someone in Brussels" would or could "dictate". The EU Council agreed on those names in 1995 and 1996 ...

Christian
« Last Edit: October 07, 2007, 11:13:37 PM by chrisild »

Offline a3v1

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Linguistics and nicknames
« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2007, 10:32:20 AM »
Millions of Britons ignore the existence of the word "Pound". In everyday speech they are referring to it as "Quid" (both singular and plural). "One Quid", "A ten Quid note".
Funny enough, the same word "Quid" now is suggested (and backed by Richard Branson) as the future currency to be used outside of the Earth. "Quasi Universal Intergalactic Denomination".
Regards,
a3v1
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Money is like body fat: If there's too much of it, it always is in the wrong places.

Offline bruce61813

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« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2007, 02:03:40 AM »
In the USA:
 a $5 note was called a 'fin' in some areas
a $10 note was called a 'sawbuck'
a $20 was called a 'double sawbuck'

These terms originated before World War II, so somewhere in the 1920's to the 1930's, and usage was fairly well gone by the 1960's.

Bruce

 

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2008, 12:29:34 AM »
Maybe it's interesting to list all the Dutch coin nicknames:

2-1/2 cent - half stuiver. The final -tje is a diminutive that can be applied to just about any noun with or without reason. Also plak, a pre-decimal copper coin of varying value
5 cent - stuiver, as mentioned by a3v1, the name of 1/20th of a guilder in pre-decimal times
10 cent - dubbeltje, from double stuiver.
25 cent - kwartje, from quarter gulden. Also heitje, from the Hebrew letter he, the fifth of the Hebrew alphabet, meaning 5 stuiver.
gulden - piek, from the pike held by the allegorical woman on pre-decimal coins. Also pegel, from peil (benchmark, measure, standard)
daalder - not a decimal coin in circulation, but used in spoken language for 1-1/2 guilder, from a pre-decimal piece also worth 30 stuiver.
2-1/2 gulden - rijksdaalder, from a pre-decimal coin worth 50 stuiver (most of the time in most places)
10 gulden - joet, from the Hebrew letter jodh, used to write 10.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline africancoins

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #9 on: October 10, 2008, 09:57:24 PM »
You can see something about the Gold Z.A.R. Tickeys here.

http://www.sacoin.co.za/coin_topic8.html

There is also an old token (in two varieties) with the word "TICKEY"...... to find out more about it keep reading the magazine "Coin News"... sometime next year.

Thanks Mr Paul Baker

Offline chrisild

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #10 on: October 11, 2008, 12:37:16 AM »
When I was in (West) Berlin in 1979, an old woman told me that the 5 Pfennig coin was nicknamed a "Sechser" (a "sixer"). Most illogical, Captain! Have you ever heard of this nickname before?
Have never used it myself (I'm at the opposite end of the republic, so to say :) ) but it makes sense for them. Some countries in what later became Germany, notably Prussia, had currency systems such as 1 Thaler = 30 Silbergroschen = 360 Pfenni(n)g in the mid-19c. Thus 1 Groschen was 12 Pf - and the Sechser was a coin worth half a Groschen.

After the German Reich was founded, people used the word "Groschen" for the new 10 Pf coin (that term was used here in Rhineland too), and half of that was called "Sechser" even though it was now 5 Pf instead of 6 ...

Christian

translateltd

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #11 on: October 11, 2008, 08:07:58 AM »
So, another system with twelves, like the old British shilling, Christian. Mystery solved...

Galapagos.

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After decimalisation, sixpences continued to circulate in New Zealand for a good number of years as 5c coins (though the name wasn't carried over).  Similar sort of logic, but most interesting that the name should persist in parts of Germany for over a century after the coin in question ceased to exist.

Offline a3v1

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #12 on: October 11, 2008, 12:00:24 PM »
2-1/2 cent - half stuiver. The final -tje is a diminutive that can be applied to just about any noun with or without reason. Also plak, a pre-decimal copper coin of varying value
In addition to the above I remember my grandparents naming the half stuiver "vierduit" (four doits). The "duit" was a copper coin of 1/8 stuiver, which disappeared in the early 19th century after the introduction of the cent (1/5 stuiver). But the name "duit" lingered on well into the second half of the 20th century, and still is used but only proverbially nowadays.
Regards,
a3v1
Over half a century of experience as a coin collector.
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Money is like body fat: If there's too much of it, it always is in the wrong places.

Galapagos

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Re: Coin nicknames
« Reply #13 on: October 11, 2008, 12:16:19 PM »
After decimalisation, sixpences continued to circulate in New Zealand for a good number of years as 5c coins (though the name wasn't carried over).  Similar sort of logic, but most interesting that the name should persist in parts of Germany for over a century after the coin in question ceased to exist.

Our UK sixpence circulated too, after decimalisation, as two-and-a half pence. It was as a student in 1979 that I heard it was going to be withdrawn, and this prompted me to collect those few types still in circulation. It had been retained due to popular demand, but by 1979 it was hated as an anomaly. The half penny was demonetised at the end of 1983. In real terms our penny is now worth less than the half penny then, but it still circulates.

The dying sixpence revived my interest in coins, and I got my first world coin catalogue (Krause-Mishler) in 1979, and was enthused and fascinated by the beautiful designs being used throughout the world. I then made my first purchases by post from coin dealers - rather nervously, as I was an impecunious student. But it all worked, and that's what turned me into an active collector.

Galapagos

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Re: Coin nicknames.
« Reply #14 on: October 11, 2008, 12:31:58 PM »
Martin,
  You've forgotten to mention that the 1/- & 2/- coins also remained legal tender as 10c. & 20c. coins right up until 2006.

Aidan.
Our UK shilling and two shilling coins circulated until 1990 and 1992 respectively, when they, and their large counterparts, were replaced by the reduced size 5p and 10p coins. Until then you could still find King George VI in your change. The disappearance of these old coins made the coinage seem rather impoverished, in comparison with the variety available when I was a child, with pennies and ha'pennies of Queen Victoria still in circulation.

Now our decimal coinage seems to have come of age, with 3 different portraits of the Queen, two reverse design sets, and the many different designs, regular and one-year only, to be found on the reverses of the 50p, pound and 2 pound coins. And the 5p and 10p coins with rounded edges from the early 90s still circulate. You can't stand these on their side - they fall down. The straight-edged ones don't.