Author Topic: Mauritius coins  (Read 6681 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline gerard974

  • Meritorious Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 860
Mauritius coins
« on: August 01, 2011, 02:50:26 PM »
Hello
I return of some days from Mauritius island and i have finded these coins
best regards  Gerard
« Last Edit: October 28, 2013, 06:28:57 PM by Afrasi »

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 875
Re: Mauritius coins
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2011, 03:00:24 PM »
I like that coat of arms, with the dodo and the deer. Have you seen my topic, Coats of arms with ANIMAL supporters ? I don't have that one in there.

The dodo alone is an attractive design, too.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline gerard974

  • Meritorious Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 860
Re: Mauritius coins
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2011, 03:40:05 PM »
Hi
Yes you have make a very nice topic
Best regards  Gerard

Offline Bimat

  • आदित्य
  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11 492
  • Mumbai, India.
Mauritius coins
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2011, 04:32:31 PM »
Very nice coins, Gerard! :)

I'm waiting for a day when a country (apart from India) will issue a circulating commemorative on Mahatma Gandhi.. ::)

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Online Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31 362
Re: Mauritius coins
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2011, 11:21:58 PM »
I have a weak spot for the coins of Mauritius. The island was first described by Arabs, next by Portuguese who got lost, then by the Dutch, blown off course by a storm. The latter started the first colony in 1638. They used the generic coins of the VOC, generally assigned to the Netherlands East Indies, but in reality spread over a large area from the Cape to Taiwan. The colony was abandoned in 1710.

The next to try were the French, who eventually changed the name from Mauritius to Ile de France (the area around Paris also has this name, so Gérard's visit was something of a home coming :)) The first series of coins (1723) circulated were a sou and a double sou struck at Pondicherry in French India. Next was a joint issue with Réunion, called Ile de Bourbon at the time. The denomination is strange. Three sous is 1/40 ecu, which would have been a very small silver coin of 0.737 gram or a copper monster of 36.7 grams in the homeland. Instead, it was a billon coin with so little silver that it immediately looked like blackened copper, earning it the nickname "black dog".* The coin speaks of success: the French had managed to start an economy, based on slavery and sugar.

Not many coins followed. The islands became of strategic importance during the Napoleonic wars, because Britain was fighting two wars, in India and in Europe. The two tiny French islands became a basis for French pirates preying on fat British merchantmen and providing a passage to India for French adventurers and military advisors. The British besieged and took the islands. The last French coin is a silent witness, an obsidional silver coin of 10 livres, closely representing a piece of eight. This "piastre Decaen" (after the commanding general during the siege) may be the most difficult French colonial coin to find and pay for...

Peter

* Other French billon coins, notably the 2 sous for the West Indies, went by the same nickname.
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31 362
Re: Mauritius coins
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2011, 12:06:19 AM »
The British returned Réunion when Napoléon was beaten, but they held on to Mauritius. The terms of the surrender in 1810 were that the settlers would keep their property and French law woud be maintained. It is therefore no wonder that the first British coins for Mauritius (undated, but issued around 1822) were in French and denominated 25 and 50 sous.

Yet, underneath the French skin, these coins are British. For one thing, they were minted in Calcutta. For another, the main currencies were the Indian rupee, the Spanish colonial peso (valued at 2 rupees) and the livre (valued at 10 to the peso, therefore 5 to the rupee.) As there are 20 sous to the livre, pieces of 25 and 50 sous don't fit into the French system, but they do represent respectively one and one half Spanish colonial bits (reales): 50 sous = 1.25 livre = 1/8 peso = 1 real, so 25 sous is a half real. They also fit in the Indian system: 50 sous = 1.25 livre = 1/4 rupee = 4 annas, so 25 sous is 2 annas. Perfidious.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31 362
Re: Mauritius coins
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2011, 01:32:51 AM »
The introduction of anchor money made it even more clear that the British favored Spanish colonial money for Mauritius. The coins were valued at par with the peso and the denominations of 1/2, 1/4, 1/8 and 1/16 dollar therefore corresponded exactly with 4, 2, 1 and 1/2 real(es). The 1820 coins all ended up on Mauritius. The 1822 issue was spread over several colonies, including Mauritius but the half dollars were for Mauritius only. In 1824, a token coinage in peso terms was executed in copper, but the coins were not issued and re-melted. That ended the period of anchor money.

Peter
« Last Edit: August 02, 2011, 02:09:47 AM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31 362
Re: Mauritius coins
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2011, 02:05:37 AM »
I'll spare you all kinds of complications, primarily with paper money, and fast forward half a century. The peso has withered with the Spanish colonial empire and the rupee has won. Mauritius gets a neat series of coins that look very British colonial. But ... underneath the skin, they are French! Consider this denomination, 20 cents, 1/5th rupee. It does not at all fit the pre-decimal rupee system. However, with 5 livres to the rupee, 20 cents = 1/5th rupee = 1 livre = 40 sous. The French merchants and planters must have been smiling.

The decimal rupee has endured until today on Mauritius (and the Seychelles.) I see at as a symbol of working things out in a non-violent way. In that sense, all the circulation coins of Mauritius bear homage to Gandhi's thoughts.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline gerard974

  • Meritorious Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 860
Re: Mauritius coins
« Reply #8 on: August 02, 2011, 05:34:48 AM »
Hi Peter
Thank you for these history page. For Mauritius i have not 25 and 50 sous and the anchors coins,but i find i find i find and maybee one day ???
best regards  Gerard

Offline Prosit

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4 050
Re: Mauritius coins
« Reply #9 on: August 02, 2011, 05:43:59 AM »
Coins with names, interesting  :)  Maybe it was the black spot given to Long John Silver   ;D

Dale


Instead, it was a billon coin with so little silver that it immediately looked like blackened copper, earning it the nickname "black dog".* Peter


Offline gerard974

  • Meritorious Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 860
Mauritius coins
« Reply #10 on: September 27, 2011, 03:58:44 PM »
Hello
I have finded these new coins from Mauritius island
Best regards  Gerard

Offline bagerap

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1 324
Re: Mauritius coins
« Reply #11 on: September 27, 2011, 04:27:26 PM »
Magnifique

Online Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31 362
Re: Mauritius coins
« Reply #12 on: September 27, 2011, 04:46:44 PM »
The Bill for the establishment of the Bank of Mauritius as the central bank of Mauritius was passed by the Legislative Assembly on 26 July 1966. It received the assent of the British Governor-General on 28 September 1966 and became an Act when it was gazetted on 15 October 1966. The first Directors of the Board of the Bank were appointed in July 1967. The Bank of Mauritius started its operations in August 1967. Mauritius became independent on 12th March, 1968.

One wonders what the bank has in common with the dodo...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bimat

  • आदित्य
  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11 492
  • Mumbai, India.
Mauritius coins
« Reply #13 on: September 27, 2011, 04:47:49 PM »
One wonders what the bank has in common with the dodo...
I think those are two different coins..

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Sir George

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 11
Re: Mauritius coins
« Reply #14 on: May 08, 2020, 07:40:31 PM »
Hello bimat.:
gerard is right with showing the 2007 commemorative coin.: --->> 3 posts above
These are the Avers and the Revers of the *40 years of BoM coin*.!


Meanwhile we have 3 coins more.:
 1 silver coin
and two Gold coins for the 50 years anniversary of the BoM 2017

But.:
If you want to buy them you have to go to the BoM in Port Louis.!
They do not sell elsewhere -- and do not export off course.

( As much as I know )