Author Topic: New UK coins for 2012 Diamond Jubilee  (Read 11045 times)

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Offline augsburger

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Re: New UK coins for 2012 Diamond Jubilee
« Reply #15 on: October 11, 2011, 04:42:27 PM »
Interesting from the point of view of when the queen is gone there is a portrait of her looking really old and wrinkly, apart from that it's £12.99 or something, absolute rip off, I stopped getting £5 coins when they started charging more than £5 for them.

translateltd

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Re: New UK coins for 2012 Diamond Jubilee
« Reply #16 on: October 17, 2011, 11:13:52 AM »
"God guide my steps" is another option in English, since the vocative "O" isn't really used in English any more.  Wasn't the Latin text used on the 1897 Diamond Jubilee medals too?

Offline chrisild

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Re: New UK coins for 2012 Diamond Jubilee
« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2011, 12:20:43 PM »
Apparently it goes back even further. From the Royal Mint's info page: "In another link to the coinage of Victoria, the latin words DIRIGE DEUS GRESSUS MEOS (May God Guide My Steps) which appeared on the gold £5 coin of 1839, completes the design." (See the link that coffeetime posted; you may have to click on Show/hide further information about this product.)

(I was tempted to add "sic" two times. ;D )

Christian

Offline kena

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Re: New UK coins for 2012 Diamond Jubilee
« Reply #18 on: October 17, 2011, 12:50:33 PM »
Like Augsburger, I have stopped buying these as well.  Was nice to pick them up for £5 with no charge for shipping.

Over 3x face by the time you add shipping for a base medal coin is rather silly in my opinion.

The papers will make a big deal out of what is on the coin to try but even then I don't think much of the British public could care.

Just like most of them have no idea that all the current coins carry a Latin inscription whose full form is ELIZABETH II DEI GRATIA REGINA FIDEI DEFENSOR, meaning "Elizabeth II, by the grace of God, Queen and Defender of the Faith".

I rather disagree that religion has no place in public life and have always felt that people who don't want to live in a country which is Christian based, should not do so rather than forcing that country to change their ways.

Ken

Offline chrisild

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Re: New UK coins for 2012 Diamond Jubilee
« Reply #19 on: October 17, 2011, 01:42:41 PM »
I rather disagree that religion has no place in public life and have always felt that people who don't want to live in a country which is Christian based, should not do so rather than forcing that country to change their ways.

In West Germany at the time of the Cold War, some attempts to change things would get you the famous "geh doch rüber" (ie. move to the GDR) comment from those opposed to changes. I find such a "take it or leave (the country)" approach quite strange.

As for the coin, yes, it is quite expensive even in the base metal version. And since the design is not exactly thrilling in my opinion, I will most probably not get that one.

Christian
« Last Edit: October 17, 2011, 02:14:34 PM by chrisild »

Offline FosseWay

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Re: New UK coins for 2012 Diamond Jubilee
« Reply #20 on: October 17, 2011, 04:27:30 PM »
I rather disagree that religion has no place in public life and have always felt that people who don't want to live in a country which is Christian based, should not do so rather than forcing that country to change their ways.

It depends really on what that 'place' is. I have no problem whatsoever with anyone proclaiming their own religion. As far as I'm concerned, that right extends right up the political pecking order, so if the Prime Minister wants to make it abundantly clear he's a Christian, as Tony Blair did, I don't mind. I also don't have a problem with using the religious substrate of the indigenous cultures of the UK in semi-official ways (such as earmarking state funding for the upkeep of religious monuments like cathedrals), so long as there is no discrimination on grounds of religion.

Where I do have a problem is with throwaway comments by some politicians over the years (Norman Tebbitt springs to mind, but there are others who are less generally rabid as well) to the effect that England/the UK is a 'Christian' country and should therefore do X, Y and Z. No, it isn't, and to see the offensiveness of such a statement, replace 'Christian' with 'white' and tell me you're happy with the subtext of that statement. The UK is a country in which more people claim to be Christian than any other religion and which has had long and close ties with Christianity. It is also a country in which more people are white than any other skin colour and which has had long and close ties with other Caucasian cultures and countries. There are also more English people there than any other nationality, and more straight people than gays. But as I say, we don't go round describing the UK as a 'white' country, or an 'English' one, or a 'straight' one.

In practice, for most people the forms of words surrounding the monarch and her place as titular head of the Church of England is just noise, even if they are committed Christians themselves, for the simple reason that the (dis)establishment of the C of E and the Queen's status in it are irrelevant to any Christian's personal faith. So for as long as it doesn't cause problems, I see no reason to rock any constitutional boats. But the moment the antiquated nature of the constitution gets in the way of something positive, or of abolishing something negative, it must be changed, and fast.

translateltd

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Re: New UK coins for 2012 Diamond Jubilee
« Reply #21 on: October 17, 2011, 08:12:31 PM »
Apparently it goes back even further. From the Royal Mint's info page: "In another link to the coinage of Victoria, the latin words DIRIGE DEUS GRESSUS MEOS (May God Guide My Steps) which appeared on the gold £5 coin of 1839, completes the design." (See the link that coffeetime posted; you may have to click on Show/hide further information about this product.)

(I was tempted to add "sic" two times. ;D )

Christian

I know about the 1839 coin - that's why I said "too" in reference to the 1897 medals.  I think I was getting mixed up, anyway - here's the 1897 medal I was thinking of; you can see the influence on the new "coin" design, though, with the "then" and "now" effigies and the horizontal lettering:

http://www.taxfreegold.co.uk/1897diamondjubileegoldmedal.php


Offline Abhay

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Royal Mint Reveals New Coin for The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee
« Reply #22 on: October 27, 2011, 05:18:23 AM »
October 20, 2011 – For Her Majesty The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee in 2012, the Royal Mint has unveiled the only official UK GBP 5 coin struck to mark the historic occasion, featuring two new and exclusive portraits of the monarch.

Designed by Ian Rank-Broadley FRBS to celebrate a remarkable royal milestone, the portraits encapsulate The Queen’s 60 years on the throne, a regal achievement matched only by the reign of Queen Victoria, The Queen’s great-great grandmother.

The first of the new portraits shows a contemporary image of Her Majesty dressed in formal Garter Robes, captured with gravitas and stately bearing. The other portrait, inspired by the first portrait of The Queen to appear on coins in 1953, features a young monarch classically depicted, wearing a laurel crown alongside the Latin words Dirige Deus Gressus Meos – May God Guide My Steps.

Combined, both portraits tell a celebratory story of a rich, historical reign, from the fresh and optimistic beginning of a new Elizabethan era to the gravitas of an assured and dignified Head of State, 60 years on.

Mr Rank-Broadley’s contemporary obverse design was inspired by the bronze sculpture of Queen Elizabeth II he made in 2009, which is situated in the Supreme Court.

Lord Phillips, President of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom said: “We were delighted to learn that the sculpture which stands proudly in our entrance hall has been used as inspiration for the effigy on the new UK GBP 5 coin. Each coin produced will convey the very best wishes of this Court as Her Majesty, the nation and the Commonwealth prepare to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee.”

The use of foliage on the reverse of the new coin is a pleasing link to the Diamond Jubilee medal of Queen Victoria, the only other British monarch to achieve her Diamond Jubilee. The Latin words Dirige Deus Gressus Meos – May God Guide My Steps again makes reference to Queen Victoria as they appeared on the Una and the Lion coin of 1839 which was the first coin to carry Queen Victoria’s portrait.

Commenting on the new coin, Kevin Clancy, Director of the Royal Mint Museum said: “Working with some of the finest artists in Britain, the Royal Mint has captured The Queen’s likeness on the coinage for almost 60 years and in her Diamond Jubilee year we wanted to honour her remarkable achievements with a remarkable coin. Ian’s new portraits tell the story of The Queen’s long reign with beauty and elegance, dignity and character, evoking the spirit of The Queen as only a truly gifted artist can”.

The precious metal coins will be available in Silver Proof, Silver Piedfort, Gold Plated Silver, Gold and Platinum from January 2012. The official UK GBP 5 coin to commemorate the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee is available from the Royal Mint’s website.

Source:  Coinsweekly

Abhay
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Offline Abhay

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Re: New UK coins for 2012 Diamond Jubilee
« Reply #23 on: December 25, 2011, 05:55:16 AM »
The Australian Coin from Perth Mint - for 2012 Diamond Jubilee.

Abhay
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Offline Bimat

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New UK coins for 2012 Diamond Jubilee
« Reply #24 on: December 25, 2011, 12:21:01 PM »
I got the £5 crown last week with Andy's help and it looks nice! :)

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline chrisild

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Re: New UK coins for 2012 Diamond Jubilee
« Reply #25 on: December 25, 2011, 01:08:21 PM »
The comment I am tempted to make is actually part of most of these coins: Ha!

 8) Christian

Offline Bimat

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New UK coins for 2012 Diamond Jubilee
« Reply #26 on: December 26, 2011, 03:31:47 PM »
Just realized that this £5 crown is my first coin dated 2012! ;) :D

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Bimat

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New UK coins for 2012 Diamond Jubilee
« Reply #27 on: December 31, 2015, 03:48:11 PM »
The Royal Mint planned a special 60p coin to mark the Queen's Diamond Jubilee - only to cancel it at the last minute

By TIM SCULTHORPE, MAILONLINE DEPUTY POLITICAL EDITOR

A special six-sided 60p coin to mark the Queen's Diamond Jubilee reached George Osborne's desk only to be cancelled by the Royal Mint at the 11th hour, it emerged today.

The 60p coin was fully designed and researched by the Royal Mint and a briefing note for the Chancellor asked for a final approval within two weeks.

But despite Treasury officials raising no objection the coin was not produced after Royal Mint officials decided there were already enough commemorative coins to mark the occasion.

A round commemorative coin was issued by the Royal Mint this summer to mark the Queen becoming Britain's longest serving monarch.

The Queen's jubilee in 2012 was celebrated with a year-long calendar of events and coincided with the London Olympic Games.

The details of the abandoned six-sided 60p project have come to light after the Press Association used Freedom of Information laws to secure the release of themes considered by the Royal Mint Advisory Committee, the quango responsible for recommending designs of coins to the Treasury.

The Royal Mint initially refused to release the documents but was forced to disclose them by the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) following a successful appeal.

But the Royal Mint declined to release the image of the proposed 60p coin, which was not intended for general circulation but as a commemorative collectable, on the grounds of 'commercial sensitivity'.

A document from Kevin Clancy, secretary to the Royal Mint Advisory Committee, and addressed to the Master of the Mint - Mr Osborne - under the subject 'additional United Kingdom coins for Diamond Jubilee' was written on February 24 2011.

This was part of the regular process used by the Royal Mint to suggest ideas to the Treasury and to secure ministerial and then royal approval for new coin designs.

The document noted the Royal Mint was 'concerned' that such an event of 'huge national importance' should be marked with more than one type of coin, adding that Treasury officials had 'no objection' to what it was proposing.

Under the recommendation section is included 'a new 60p coin' while it is further noted that officials wanted Mr Osborne's approval within two weeks and royal approval after a further fortnight.

The document states: 'It is recommended that an entirely new denomination coin - a 60p piece - should be produced to commemorate the 60 years of Her Majesty's reign.

'The proposed coin would be a six-sided bi-colour coin with round of nickel-brass and a shaped outer of cupro-nickel. A visual of what the obverse of the coin might look like is attached.

'The coin would be issued for commemorative purposes only, there being no intention for it to be issued into general circulation.

'A coin of this shape and denomination has never been issued before in the United Kingdom and the Royal Mint undertakes not to issue only in connection with the Diamond Jubilee.

'Research has been conducted amongst consumers with a majority expressing a preference for the issue of such a coin.'

The recommendation at the end of the ministerial submission, which also included a Diamond Jubilee kilo coin, stated: 'It is judged that the the issue of these new United Kingdom coins will be free from any risk of controversy and will, in fact, meet with wide general appeal.

'If ministers are content to approve the proposals set out in this submission a royal submission will be prepared.'

But the 60p piece was not included in the coins released for the Diamond Jubilee in 2012, which sold thousands and included - among others - different versions of a £5 coin.

Gerry Buddle, a specialist at the London Numismatic Club, said he would have liked to have seen a 60p coin for general circulation, although he believed a commemorative one would have had a 'certain curiosity interest' and made a nice souvenir.

He said: 'I think the idea of a 60p coin was actually quite imaginative for the Royal Mint, who are usually very conservative about their approach to our currency.

'That was probably why the idea was finally dropped - I suspect the senior staff at the Mint felt it was too gimmicky.

'Though a look at the coinage of the first Queen Elizabeth shows much less caution with such odd denominations as 3/4d or 1 1/2d (a penny-halfpenny).'

Source: Daily Mail
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.