New UK coins for 2012 Diamond Jubilee

Started by SandyGuyUK, July 15, 2011, 06:51:36 PM

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SandyGuyUK

Taken from today's London Gazette:

Date: 14 July 2011 Issue Number: 59850 Page number: 13414
Publication Date: Thursday, 14 July 2011

Notice Code: 1101

BY THE QUEEN

A PROCLAMATION

DETERMINING THE SPECIFICATIONS AND DESIGN FOR FIVE-POUND COINS COMMEMORATING OUR DIAMOND JUBILEE

ELIZABETH R.

Whereas under section 3(1)(a), (b), (cc), (d) and (dd) of the Coinage Act 1971 We have power, with the advice of Our Privy Council, by Proclamation to determine the denomination, the design and dimensions of coins to be made at Our Mint, to determine the weight and composition of coins other than gold coins or coins of silver of Our Maundy money and the remedy to be allowed in making such coins and to determine the percentage of impurities which such coins may contain:

And Whereas under section 3(1)(f) and (ff) of the Coinage Act 1971 We have power, with the advice of Our Privy Council, by Proclamation to direct that coins made at Our Mint other than gold, silver, cupro-nickel and bronze coins shall be current and that any coin shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount:

And Whereas under section 6(2) of the Coinage Act 1971 We have power, with the advice of Our Privy Council, by Proclamation to prescribe the composition of the standard trial plates to be used for determining the justness of coins of any metal other than gold, silver or cupro-nickel:

And Whereas it appears to Us desirable to order that, to commemorate Our Diamond Jubilee, there should be made at Our Mint coins of the denomination of five pounds in platinum, in gold, in gold-plated silver, in silver and in cupro-nickel:

We, therefore, in pursuance of the said section 3(1)(a), (b), (cc), (d), (dd), (f) and (ff), the said section 6(2), and of all other powers enabling Us in that behalf, do hereby, by and with the advice of Our Privy Council, proclaim, direct and ordain as follows:

PLATINUM PIEDFORT COIN

1.  (1) A new coin of platinum of the denomination of five pounds shall be made, being a coin of a standard weight of 94.2 grammes, a standard diameter of 38.608 millimetres, and being circular in shape.

(2) In the making of the said platinum coin a remedy (that is, a variation from the standard weight or dimensions specified above) shall be allowed of an amount not exceeding the following, that is to say:

(a)  a variation from the said standard weight of an amount per coin of 0.8 grammes; and

(b)  a variation from the said standard diameter of 0.125 millimetres per coin.

(3) The said platinum coin may contain impurities of three-tenths of one per centum.

(4) The said platinum coin shall be current and shall be legal tender for payment of any amount in any part of Our United Kingdom.

(5) The composition of the standard trial plates to be used for determining the justness of the said platinum coin shall be pure platinum.

GOLD COIN

2.  A new coin of gold of the denomination of five pounds shall be made, being a coin of a standard diameter of 38.608 millimetres, and being circular in shape.

GOLD-PLATED SILVER COIN

3.  (1) A new coin of gold-plated silver of the denomination of five pounds shall be made, being a coin of a standard weight (including the gold plate) of 28.276 grammes, a standard diameter of 38.608 millimetres, a standard composition (excluding the gold plate) of 925 parts per thousand fine silver, being circular in shape, and being plated with fine gold of a standard weight of plating of 0.10 grammes.

(2) In the making of the said gold-plated silver coin a remedy (that is, a variation from the standard weight, composition or dimensions specified above) shall be allowed of an amount not exceeding the following, that is to say:

(a)  a variation from the said standard weight of an amount per coin of 0.20 grammes;

(b)  a variation from the said standard weight of plating of an amount per coin of 0.07 grammes;

(c)  in relation to those parts of the coin other than the gold plating, a variation from the said standard composition of five parts per thousand fine silver; and

(d)  a variation from the said standard diameter of 0.125 millimetres per coin.

(3) The said gold-plated silver coin shall be current and shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount in any part of Our United Kingdom.

SILVER COIN

4.  (1) A new coin of silver of the denomination of five pounds shall be made, being a coin of a standard weight of 28.276 grammes, a standard diameter of 38.608 millimetres, a standard composition of 925 parts per thousand fine silver, and being circular in shape.

(2) In the making of the said silver coin a remedy (that is, a variation from the standard weight, diameter or composition specified above) shall be allowed of an amount not exceeding the following, that is to say:

(a)  a variation from the said standard weight of an amount per coin of 0.13 grammes;

(b)  a variation from the said standard diameter of 0.125 millimetres per coin; and

(c)  a variation from the said standard composition of five parts per thousand fine silver.

(3) The said silver coin shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount in any part of Our United Kingdom.

SILVER PIEDFORT COIN

5.  (1) A new coin of silver of the denomination of five pounds shall be made, being a coin of a standard weight of 56.552 grammes, a standard diameter of 38.608 millimetres, a standard composition of 925 parts per thousand fine silver, and being circular in shape.

(2) In the making of the said silver coin a remedy (that is, a variation from the standard weight, composition or dimensions specified above) shall be allowed of an amount not exceeding the following, that is to say:

(a)  a variation from the said standard weight of an amount per coin of 0.215 grammes;

(b)  a variation from the said standard composition of five parts per thousand fine silver; and

(c)  a variation from the said standard diameter of 0.125 millimetres per coin.

(3) The said silver coin shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount in any part of Our United Kingdom.

CUPRO-NICKEL COIN

6.  (1) A new coin of cupro-nickel of the denomination of five pounds shall be made, being a coin of a standard weight of 28.276 grammes, a standard diameter of 38.608 millimetres, a standard composition of seventy-five per centum copper and twenty-five per centum nickel, and being circular in shape.

(2) In the making of the said cupro-nickel coin a remedy (that is, a variation from the standard weight, composition or dimensions specified above) shall be allowed of an amount not exceeding the following, that is to say:

(a)  a variation from the said standard weight of an amount per coin of 0.13 grammes;

(b)  a variation from the said standard composition of two per centum copper and two per centum nickel; and

(c)  a variation from the said standard diameter of 0.125 millimetres per coin.

(3) The said cupro-nickel coin may contain impurities of three-quarters of one per centum.

(4) The said cupro-nickel coin shall be legal tender for the payment of any amount in any part of Our United Kingdom.

DESIGN OF THE COINS

7.  The design of the said coins shall be as follows:

'For the obverse impression Our effigy, inspired by the sculpture mounted in the entrance to the Supreme Court building on Parliament Square, with the inscription "ELIZABETH ∙ II ∙ D ∙ G REG ∙ F ∙ D ∙ FIVE POUNDS", and for the reverse an adaptation of Our effigy first used on United Kingdom coins from 1953, with an olive branch and ribbon below, the date "2012" to the left and the inscription "DIRIGE DEVS GRESSVS MEOS" to the right. The platinum, gold and silver coins will have a plain edge and in incuse letters the inscription "A VOW MADE GOOD", while the gold-plated silver and cupro-nickel coins will have a graining upon the edge'.

8.  This Proclamation shall come into force on the fourteenth day of July Two thousand and eleven.

Given at Our Court at Buckingham Palace, this thirteenth day of July in the year of our Lord Two thousand and eleven and in the sixtieth year of Our Reign.

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN

(1401052)
Ian
UK

Figleaf

Thanks, Hertfordian.

Doesn't sound like a daring design. What does the sculpture mounted in the entrance to the Supreme Court building on Parliament Square look like?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

andyg

I was sort of wondering if maybe we'd get a new effigy next year,
the previous one having run from 1985 to 1997 (12 years), this one from 1998 will be 14 years next year.
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

chrisild

Quote from: Figleaf on July 16, 2011, 01:03:28 AM
What does the sculpture mounted in the entrance to the Supreme Court building on Parliament Square look like?

Could it be this one? Scroll down to "Queen Elizabeth II bas-relief sculpture" here:
http://www.supremecourt.gov.uk/visiting/new-artwork.html

Christian

SandyGuyUK

Thanks Christian for posting the link. It's not exactly the most inspiring depiction of HM is it but then maybe that's not helped by the size of the image on that website.

I could imagine that there may well be a new depiction on circulation coins given that the current one has now been used since 1998 (13 years) and if one compares that with the previous obverses, that's about average - e.g.:

Gillick 1953-1967 (14 years)
Machin 1968-1984 (16 years)
Maklouf 1985-1997 (12 years)
Rank-Broadley 1998-2011? (13 years)

What do others think?  Let's face it, if Liz lasts as long as her mother, then it's bound to change again at some point unless the Royal Mint are suddenly going to do a repeat of Queen Victoria who had essentially the same portrait on some of her coins (barring  a few cosmetic tweaks) from when she was 18 (1837) until she 68 (1887)!
Ian
UK

FosseWay

Sorry, I'm in a pedantic mood.

1. Why does the London Gazette insist on referring to peculiar units called 'grammes'? The SI unit of mass is the gram in English. We aren't French!

2. The Royal Mint page linked to by coffeetime translates Dirige Deus gressús meos as 'May God direct my steps'. More accurately, it is 'Direct my steps, O God'.

UK Decimal +


When I went to school, it was gramme - see also Oxford Dictionary Online.

What is perhaps more confusing is the abbreviation for 'grain' (referring to a weight, used for British coins and jewellery) which is 'gr' and could well be misread as meaning 'gramme'.

Whenever I quote the weight of pre-decimal coins, I usually put 'grains' in full, although for subsequent entries I might use 'gn' which also appears on my electronic scales.   I also put the metric weight alongside.

Don't forget that the London Gazette is an official news source, and is written in 'legalese'.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

chrisild

And while we're at it, think about meters and liters too :) Anyway, so the design will not be unveiled until October, hm?

Christian

augsburger

Got to admire a company that comes out and tells everyone something they already know, that there will be new coins in 2012. Shock horror, as there have been new coins every year for the last 10 years at least, and a new £5 since 1995 or something like that.

As for spellings. Program or Programme? Not sure many use the latter. Though it seems now that there is they're or their and two is too or to. AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!

chrisild

Quote from: augsburger on August 18, 2011, 08:30:58 AM
Got to admire a company that comes out and tells everyone something they already know, that there will be new coins in 2012.

It gets even better. :) Have a look at this Coin World article:
http://www.coinworld.com/articles/royal-mint-to-release-new-elizabeth-ii-effigy/

Quote: "A Royal Mint official initially asked that Coin World not publish a story about the new effigy until October. However, Coin World informed the official that it would publish the article because details about the new effigy had already been revealed through a publicly available government document. That document authorizing the coins also identified the sculpture that is the source for the effigy. The agency where the sculpture is on display identified the sculpture's designer before the Royal Mint's Aug. 12 press release was issued."

Oh the suspense ...

Christian

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

malj1

Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

FosseWay

I quite like that, actually. But why couldn't they get DIRIGE all on one line, or at least give it a blessed hyphen, for heaven's sake?

Figleaf

An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

FosseWay

You have a point, up to a point  :)

If we were starting a currency for the UK from scratch, it would indeed be most perverse to use Latin (or indeed any language other than English) on the coins. But where there is little meaning to impart, and misunderstanding or lack of understanding don't matter, I see no harm in quirky traditions. The royal titles have been presented in Latin on English/UK coins since Adam was a lad, and I don't think that any negative characteristic of the UK could be improved by changing that.

On the specific use of Latin for Dirige Domine..., firstly it directly recalls the text used on the Una and the Lion £5 coin of 1839. This is an iconic British coin and arguably represents one of the high points of British coin design. It's also associated with a long-serving, conscientious and influential queen, factors that no doubt Ian Rank-Broadley and the Royal Mint will have been keen to capitalise on. If it had been translated into English, it would have lost all of those associations. (This demonstrates that the words themselves are the primary issue, with the meaning behind them very much a secondary consideration.)

This leads to a more prosaic and perhaps depressing reason for using Latin. If the Mint produced a coin saying 'O God, direct my steps' in English, it would doubtless attract criticism from all sorts of people with religious axes to grind, whether of the Dawkins school saying that religion of any kind has no place in public life, or from people who feel that the wrong type of god is being referred to. If it's in Latin, 99% of people won't give it a second thought. Given that the point of the coin isn't to inspire a debate on religion but to commemorate the Queen's 60th anniversary, it's probably wise to avoid consciously poking hornets' nests.