Author Topic: Aurangzeb, Rupee, Dar al Khilafat-Shahjahanabad, AH1119 RY51 - Posthoumous Issue  (Read 1118 times)

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Offline asm

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Record clearly indicate that Aurangzeb died during his 51st year of rule in the year AH 1118. There were instances when some far off mints did not get news of the passing away of a ruler for a few days. However the national capital?

What was the cause of the issue from the Capital issuing coins in the name of an emperor who had passed away? All the claimants seem to have been away at the time of Aurangzeb's death. Were the officer's confused by the war of succession amongst the sons of Aurangzeb?

The coins AH 1119 RY 51 are known from a few other mints as well.



Amit
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

Offline Oesho

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Rupees and mohurs of Aurangzeb, with the date AH1119/Ry.51 are known from several places, vide: Ahmadabad, Azimabad, Bareli, Junagadh (ZENO#83900, ill. KM.300.43), Multan (ZENO#73809), Shahjahanabad (ZENO#59367), Tatta. In gold examples are known from Akbarabad, Kabul, Multan and Shahjahanabad.

It is a posthumous date. Aurangzeb died 28th Zilqa'da 1118 (20 February 1707) at his camp 2 miles N.E. of  Ahmadnagar. AH1119 commenced 24 March 1707. Perhaps due to uncertainty, who would be the new emperor they continued to strike (posthumous) coins in the name of Aurangzeb at some places. The accession date of Shah Alam Bahadur was 24 Muharram AH1119 = 16 April 1707. Later on Shah Alam Bahadur issued an order that his reign should commence from 18th Zu l-hajja, 1118 = 12 March 1707, the day that he heard of his father's dead. Shah Alam Bahadur was in his camp at Jamrud, 12 miles west of Peshawar.

Kam Bakhsh was governor in the Deccan and Azam Shah in Gujarat, Kandesh and Malwa.
Azam Shah's accession is taken to be 10 Zu l'hajja 1118 = 4 March 1707. There are very few dates of 1118/Ahd, but many of 1119/Ahd. So as I said, due to the strife for hegemony it might be possible that at various places coins in the name of  Aurangzeb continued to be struck.
That this also happened at the Imperial city of Shahjahanabad is not surprising as all the players in this game for power were all far away from the centre. The possible outcome of the battle for succession may not have been very clear. Demand for money, required for economical reasons, may have been the reason that posthumous coins were struck. This way no side was taken in the strife for power.

Note: all AD-dates mentioned above are according to the Julian calendar, for the present Gregorian calendar, add 11 days.

Offline Md. Shariful Islam

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Nice to see your great collections sir.

Islam

Offline Coinsforever

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Superb & valuable information ....................asm/oesho

Great learning experience another step forward which is attracting me towards Great Mughal coins.

Cheers  ;D
Every experience, good or bad, is a priceless collector's item.



http://knowledge-numismatics.blogspot.in/

akona20

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This has brought up a need for a revision on some very recent work completed on 1118 dates for Azam Shah. There has been a minor lack of clarity (as least to me) in a number of entries.

It should be noted that 1118 for Azam Shah are listed from Ahmadabad as well as 1119.51 from Aurangzeb. Ahmadabad was a point of call Azam's eldest son Bidar Bakat early in his journey on his way to meet his father for the coming battle.

Offline asm

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Dear Oesho,

A fantastic lesson in Indian History. It helps clarify a lot of points.

Amit
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"