Author Topic: Tonga updates coinage (2015)  (Read 12494 times)

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Offline Bimat

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Tonga updates coinage (2015)
« on: June 26, 2011, 08:25:34 AM »
Australian mint a hit with Pacific nations
Last Updated: Fri, 24 Jun 2011 07:50:00 +1000

The Crown Prince of Tonga says his country will join Samoa by having its coins made at the Royal Australian Mint in Canberra.

Samoan representatives attended the official launch of the production of Samoa's new coins on Thursday.

Tonga's Crown Prince Tupouto'a Lavaka says the new government will also be updating the country's national currency.

"I wanted to come and see how the processes work and of course this is the new refurbished Royal Australian Mint," he said.

"We, like Samoa, have our own coins. And we are looking in about two years' time to look at renewing our currency. That's already in the pipeline now."

Mint magic

At the mint's Canberra factory, Samoan Government representatives struck their brand new coins, which will enter into circulation later this year.

Since the mint was upgraded in 2009, it has been able to accept contracts from other countries.

The Samoan deal is one of the mint's first large-scale international jobs.

Chief executive of the Royal Australian Mint, Ross MacDiarmid, has told Pacific Beat the mint could provide similar services to other Pacific nations.

"The geographical proximity [of Samoa] provides us with an opportunity to provide these sort of coins, hopefully to other Pacific island countries as well," he said.

"We can clearly provide the service - we have got the capacity - and we are just next door. So hopefully this will be the start of other opportunities for us in the Pacific."

Source: Australia Network News
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Offline <k>

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Re: Tonga updates coinage (2015)
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2012, 04:14:47 PM »
King of Tonga George Tupou V dies aged 63

Click on the link below:

King of Tonga George Tupou V dies aged 63

The Oxford-educated monarch was remembered today as “more British than the British” as locals mourned and tributes poured in for a jet-setting leader who willingly stripped away much of his own power.

King George, aged 63, was crowned after the death of his father in a lavish coronation in 2008 that lasted days and included three royal balls, a military parade and feasts featuring kava, a mildly narcotic drink, and rows of pigs presented on wooden sticks. His royal robes were stitched by a Savile Row tailor.

Despite his penchant for ceremony, globe-trotting and elaborate military garb, the monocle-wearing monarch moved quickly to end 165 years of increasingly unpopular feudal rule and transferred much of his power to a democratically-elected parliament.

"He wasn't afraid to compromise and he fulfilled his promise to grant more freedoms in just a few years on the throne," said Malakai Koloamatangi, from New Zealand's Canterbury University.

King George, who was diagnosed with cancer last year and had diabetes, was an avid rugby fan; he died in Hong Kong, where he was due to attend the annual rugby sevens competition. Tonga’s prime minister, Lord Tu'ivakano, confirmed that the king had died in a Tongan language statement on public radio.

A close friend of the monarch, Louise Raedler-Waterhouse, Tonga's Honorary Consul to Australia, said King George had “a wonderful aura about him.”

“His Majesty was one of the most enlightened people I've ever met,” she told ABC Radio. “He was a scholar, very kind-hearted and also a man of grace.... He was actually in some ways more British than the British. I think he saw the practicalities, things such as a monocle was very sensible because he didn't have to wear glasses when he was in evening wear.”

King George, believed to be the first person in his country of 100,000-odd people to earn a university degree attended Oxford and then trained at the Sandhurst military academy. He was well-liked and had explanations for many of his apparent eccentricities, including his two leather-seated cabs.

"A London taxi has the right proportions makes it easy for you to get in and out whilst wearing spurs and a sword," he said. "I realise that these criteria are not everyday considerations for the ordinary mum and dad when they come to buy a family car."

King George will be replaced by his younger brother, Crown Prince Tupouto'a Lavaka, 52.

Telegraph, 18th March 2012.

Offline <k>

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Re: Tonga updates coinage (2015)
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2012, 04:19:56 PM »
Tonga's Crown Prince Tupouto'a Lavaka says the new government will also be updating the country's national currency.
"We, like Samoa, have our own coins. And we are looking in about two years' time to look at renewing our currency. That's already in the pipeline now."

That quotation is from June 2011. So now Tonga will probably bring forward the new design series, since it will also presumably require a new portrait of the monarch. Incidentally, is there any Tongan coin that portrays the late king, Tupou V? He ascended the throne in 2006. I have seen coins for Tupou IV and Queen Salote only.

translateltd

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Re: Tonga updates coinage (2015)
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2012, 07:31:14 PM »
I was looking through Krause and Schön for the same thing yesterday but found only a commemorative in Schön - no sign of any circulating issues that I could see.  They may do a posthumous issue, as they did for Queen Salote (died 1965, coin series issued 1967).


Offline <k>

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Re: Tonga updates coinage (2015)
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2012, 07:33:47 PM »
I was looking through Krause and Schön for the same thing yesterday but found only a commemorative in Schön - no sign of any circulating issues that I could see.

Five or six years and no circulation coins with his portrait. I wonder how often that happens to a monarch? At least King Edward VIII of the UK had some trials and patterns left behind.

translateltd

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Re: Tonga updates coinage (2015)
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2012, 09:58:19 PM »
Five or six years and no circulation coins with his portrait. I wonder how often that happens to a monarch? At least King Edward VIII of the UK had some trials and patterns left behind.

There were none at all for the 47 years of Queen Salote's reign (unless you count a few NCLT issues in 1962 or thereabouts).  I assume NZ coinage was used before the 1967 decimal series, even though Tonga had its own banknotes.

And the "no portrait" thing is standard in most Islamic countries ...


Offline <k>

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Re: Tonga updates coinage (2015)
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2012, 10:03:38 PM »
There were none at all for the 47 years of Queen Salote's reign (unless you count a few NCLT issues in 1962 or thereabouts).  I assume NZ coinage was used before the 1967 decimal series, even though Tonga had its own banknotes.

Apparently Queen Salote died in December 1965. I had mistakenly thought she was still alive when the 1967 set, which carries her portrait, was issued.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Tonga updates coinage (2015)
« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2012, 11:49:50 PM »
And the "no portrait" thing is standard in most Islamic countries ...

But that would not apply to Tonga ... by the way, there are a few coins with the portrait of George Tupou V but, as mentioned here before, no circulation coins. Just banknotes and a few collector coins: http://www.tonga-coin-catalog.com/html/finanzamt___banken___zahlungsm8.html

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: Tonga updates coinage (2015)
« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2012, 12:33:34 AM »
Unfortunately the designers of the two Tupou IV circulation sets, the one first issued in 1975, and the one issued in 1981, are still a mystery to me. Here is all I know:

Thank you for contacting the Royal Australian Mint.

Our records show that the 1975 coins were based on sketches provided to the Mint on the direction of the Tongan Government by an English firm. Plaster models for the coins were sculpted by the Mint’s engravers. Because the supply of these designs to the Mint was a commercial matter between the Tongan Government and its agent, you would need to consult the Tongan Government for the identity of original artist.

The 1981 coins were prepared from plaster models supplied in aid, from a third party, and at the direction of the Tongan Government. The Mint has no information about the designer or sculptor of these models. You might also consider contacting the Tongan Ministry of Finance and National Planning.


I did contact the Tongans but received no reply.



The tortoise design on the reverse of the 1967/8 one and two seniti pieces is by Dudley Moore Blakely - that is from Royal Mint sources. I have never heard of him before or since. I have conflicting information on the other designs of 1967/8.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Tonga updates coinage (2015)
« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2012, 12:50:30 AM »
Dudley Moore Blakely (1902-1982) was an American painter, illustrator and sculptor with Tongan connections. He and his wife possibly lived there. He was a knight of Bahá'u'lláh (Bahá'í religious title.)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

translateltd

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Re: Tonga updates coinage (2015)
« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2012, 01:50:56 AM »
But that would not apply to Tonga ...

The question wasn't limited to Tonga :-)  Of Tonga's five monarchs, only two have appeared on circulating coins in any case, and one of those (Queen Charlotte/Salote) was posthumous.


Offline <k>

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Re: Tonga updates coinage (2015)
« Reply #11 on: January 02, 2015, 09:08:12 PM »
Why are we waiting?  ::)

Offline Bimat

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Re: Tonga updates coinage (2015)
« Reply #12 on: January 03, 2015, 09:12:43 AM »
Why are we waiting?  ::)

Because they haven't issued new coins yet. ;D

I haven't read / heard of new coins after I posted that article. May be they have postponed the plan.

Aditya
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Offline <k>

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Re: Tonga updates coinage (2015)
« Reply #13 on: January 03, 2015, 01:05:22 PM »
Curious that all these Pacific islands have been issuing new design series, but Tonga has held back so far. Even more curious is the case of Australia, whose original series dates back to 1966, nearly 50 years ago, but who has no plans to change. The country will end up with a completely new set by default, though, as lower denominations drop out and higher denominations are added. Their circulation set already looks somewhat different from the one issued in 1966.

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Tonga updates coinage (2015)
« Reply #14 on: January 03, 2015, 02:25:07 PM »
On 18-21 Sept. 2012, Royal Australian Mint at Canberra, after having commissioned a facility of minting plated steel coins, held a workshop cum conference on new state of art technology in minting. All the pacific countries were invited and all except Tuvalu, appear to have attended.
The new series of coins were offered to be minted at a subsidised price, softened with loans, and some countries accepted the offer. Among those, who availed this offer were Samoa, Solomon Islands etc.

Others accepted the technical advice and floated global tenders. Fiji contract was won by Royal Canadian Mint but the experience was not happy. Fiji 2 Dollar coin, minted in 2012 & 2013, had to be replaced with a new coin in 2014 by Royal Canadian Mint, at its own cost.

Other nations are slowly working on accepting the same through their layers of governmental approval.

I think this year, Cook Island is likely to get new series from RAM.

Papua New Guinea appears to be next in the queue.

Tonga may be later.

In addition, I am expecting Australia to follow United Kingdom, by going in for plated- steel 5 and 10 cents ( like 5 and 10 Pence of UK) anytime soon. Perhaps they are waiting to undertake the change simultaneously, with change of effigy of Her Majesty.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2015, 04:48:13 AM by Pabitra »