Author Topic: Your coin was in the mail  (Read 13442 times)

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Offline beekar

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Re: How safe is it to send coins by Speed Post?
« Reply #15 on: October 21, 2010, 04:01:39 PM »
The image of the front side.

Offline Bimat

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How safe is it to send coins by Speed Post?
« Reply #16 on: October 21, 2010, 06:42:18 PM »
I think someone from your local post office is intentionally doing this >:(

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Abhay

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Re: How safe is it to send coins by Speed Post?
« Reply #17 on: October 23, 2010, 04:32:43 AM »
I think someone from your local post office is intentionally doing this >:(

Aditya

Even I think so. The best option will that you inform your post office, that in future, you will take OPEN DELIVERY of the parcels. But for that, you will have to collect the parcels from the Post Office itself.

Abhay
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Offline Bimat

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How safe is it to send coins by Speed Post?
« Reply #18 on: October 23, 2010, 12:22:00 PM »
The best option will that you inform your post office, that in future, you will take OPEN DELIVERY of the parcels. But for that, you will have to collect the parcels from the Post Office itself.
But then there is an additional risk: everyone in the post office will come to know that you are 'illegally' importing coins.The link given by kansal888 clearly mentions that coins can be sent only if the letter is insured.If it's a normal speed post or registered one, then there is a problem :(

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Figleaf

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Your coin was in the mail
« Reply #19 on: October 09, 2011, 11:38:18 PM »
In the face of a disgusting recent theft, here are some thoughts on sending coins abroad.

There is no safe way to send coins by mail. There is no safe country. All you can do is decrease risk, unless you can use the services of a traveller who is willing to play courier. It is common politeness to ask in advance and thank afterwards.

Make sure coins are not visible when the package is held in front of a strong light. You can hide round shapes by putting them in aluminium foil folded in a square. Avoid the word coin" in the address, the return address or the description of the contents. Avoid a situation where the coins can be felt through the packaging. If you are sending a large lot, wrapping them in waste paper and tape creates an unidentifiable clump of metal.

When sending a single coin to a known contact, I have had 100% success with sending unregistered. The coin was in a clear coin bag, taped in two folded sheets of paper.

When sending few coins, I like hiding them in an old edition or a book I no longer use. For some reason, book get through unmolested.

When sending a heavy package, I seal all sides with duct tape and write the weight of the package half on the enveloppe, half on the tape. It is difficult to open the package unnoticed and close it again. Recipient can check contents without opening the enveloppe and refuse emptied packages.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Prosit

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Re: Your coin was in the mail
« Reply #20 on: October 10, 2011, 12:02:40 AM »
Recently I sent a token of no great value to India.  I slit a piece of coragated cardboard and sliped it inside and taped it shut, put it in a small envelope and sent it regular mail.  Cost me a dollar to mail and it arrived. The envelope looked and felt like a birthday card.

For more coins, I usually fold them in strips in foil or newspaper and put them cushioned (below and above) in a box. For many countries, small heavy boxes, especially to smaller countries, are going to be opened and that is that. Get used to it. Most arrive anyway.

One or two coins I am confident I can send anywhere. More than that, I am scared to send to India. More coins than that and for heavy packages I am scared to send to Italy and Portugal as I have had the packages stuck in customs for months but the coins eventually arrived after paying a "tax".

Random losses for me have been from Canada, to England and to the Netherlands.  No help for the ones I sent as they were well packed and well disguised.

US customs....the US is a large, fairly wealthy country with a massive mail system.  I have never had a package sent to me show evidence of opening.  They are looking for bigger stuff like drugs.  I am sure the heavier ones get x-rayed. Smaller countries like Portugal, well seems to me they have less volume to investigate so they look a little closer.

Just my experience.
Dale


Offline Coinsforever

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Re: Your coin was in the mail
« Reply #21 on: October 10, 2011, 01:16:00 AM »
Due to growing awareness of this hobby  now a days , there is always been risk of using post/courier for sending/receiving coins.

I have never seen some one who claim that  he/she  got compensated for loss/theft  , fact is that loss means loss.

While in case of postage stamps/bank notes one can pack  it in black sheet so that x ray scanner could not trace it and always take a chance.


Cheers ;D
Every experience, good or bad, is a priceless collector's item.



http://knowledge-numismatics.blogspot.in/

Offline Prosit

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Re: Your coin was in the mail
« Reply #22 on: October 10, 2011, 01:38:38 AM »
yeah, but that is likely to be opened
I wish it were not so.
Dale


While in case of postage stamps/bank notes one can pack  it in black sheet so that x ray scanner could not trace it and always take a chance.


Cheers ;D

Offline alglasser

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Re: Your coin was in the mail
« Reply #23 on: October 10, 2011, 03:02:40 AM »
I did investigate another overseas shipper when sending a few coins and holders to Bangladesh. Sorry I can't remember the name of the shipping company...not one commonly used here in the U.S.A.. The cost for about $1 worth of holders and maybe $5 worth of coins was 89 Dollars U.S.!  This can't be right so instead of trying it online, I called the company, explained what I was shipping, weight about 2 ounces (about 1/10 kilo) and the rate was $89. Nope!

One thing I didn't think about is international laws and I certainly don't want to get anyone in trouble by sending even coins at no cost to the recipient. I believe Bangladesh has a prohibition about shipping money in or our (not sure) and India I have learned may be somewhat similar.

I have sold coins to many, many people in many countries, and the buyer will often ask me to lie on declarations papers. I will NOT do this. Either all is legal ...or I will not comply at all. I'm not a coin dealer, but I don't want anyone to get in trouble. I have sent coins as gifts in regular mail overseas...and happy to do so...but run the risk of loss. Many have made it, some have not. I don't know the regulations for every country. I won't send more.

Still, it is a shame that this small, harmless exchange between countries and collector friends is inhibited because of the dishonesty of a few (hopefully it's just a few). Hopefully, someday there will be a solution that works for everyone.   Alan   Massachusetts

Offline Prosit

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Re: Your coin was in the mail
« Reply #24 on: October 10, 2011, 04:16:11 AM »
I, on the other hand do not have a problem lying on a declaration form. I do not agree that many (or most) of those laws are reasonable or necessary or function for the common good of the people or even of the government that enacted them in any way form or fashion.  I have no problem breaking them however I do not lie to myself in justifying it... it may not be wrong morally (entirely a totally different question) but it is illegal and I am willing to do it anyway in this particular instance, fully prepared to pay the consequence.  The concept that it is the law and wrong involkes no sense of it is wrong in me in any way, moral wise, or even ethicaly...not the same thing at all and they are not equal. I make my decisions with open eyes and not blindly following the "law" becasue it is the law.

I do not believe (and never have) that the law is the law and something sanskrit. I have been a party to making law in Texas and I can tell you that we make mistakes, do not always get it right and ocassionally make bad laws that have unforeseen consequences.  I believe that is universal. I will be my own judge as to what is moral or not and I do not break any laws with impunity.  I know and am prepared top pay the consequences when I do.

Dale




I have sold coins to many, many people in many countries, and the buyer will often ask me to lie on declarations papers. I will NOT do this. Alan   Massachusetts
« Last Edit: October 10, 2011, 04:21:38 AM by Prosit »

Offline Abhay

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Re: Your coin was in the mail
« Reply #25 on: October 10, 2011, 05:04:24 AM »
I have sold coins to many, many people in many countries, and the buyer will often ask me to lie on declarations papers. I will NOT do this. Either all is legal ...or I will not comply at all.   Alan   Massachusetts

If I have to make a declaration, it will depend on the face value and the market value of the coins. Obviously, for a rare 1 Dollar coin, the declared value can not be less than 1 or 2 dollars, but at the same time, it is no use declaring the value as 100 dollars. For the Post office or the Customs people, it does not really matter that the declared value is 2 dollars or 100 dollars, as they often do not have the knowledge about the true value of the coin. Putting the declared value as 100 dollars will rather encourage them to steal the coin.

Abhay
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Offline FosseWay

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Re: Your coin was in the mail
« Reply #26 on: October 10, 2011, 08:26:27 AM »
I, on the other hand do not have a problem lying on a declaration form. I do not agree that many (or most) of those laws are reasonable or necessary or function for the common good of the people or even of the government that enacted them in any way form or fashion.  I have no problem breaking them however I do not lie to myself in justifying it... it may not be wrong morally (entirely a totally different question) but it is illegal and I am willing to do it anyway in this particular instance, fully prepared to pay the consequence.  The concept that it is the law and wrong involkes no sense of it is wrong in me in any way, moral wise, or even ethicaly...not the same thing at all and they are not equal. I make my decisions with open eyes and not blindly following the "law" becasue it is the law.

I do not believe (and never have) that the law is the law and something sanskrit. I have been a party to making law in Texas and I can tell you that we make mistakes, do not always get it right and ocassionally make bad laws that have unforeseen consequences.  I believe that is universal. I will be my own judge as to what is moral or not and I do not break any laws with impunity.  I know and am prepared top pay the consequences when I do.

Yes, I agree with this (a.k.a. the standard approach to speed limits adopted by the average British driver).

On a point of principle and philosophy, the Law in general, and any specific law, is there to protect the common good, whether that's an individual, a group of people or non-human items such as the environment. It isn't there as an end in itself. It therefore follows that in order to commit an illegal act, what you do must (a) have the general propensity to harm someone/thing, and (b) be shown to have actually harmed someone/thing in the specific instance in question. I would add to (b) the 'reasonable likelihood' of harm, since luck often plays an important part in whether harm actually occurs. Therefore driving while drunk should be illegal even if on a particular journey you manage to get to your destination without hitting anything, because that is largely a matter of luck and not evidence that driving while drunk is safe.

If I ruled the world, I'd pass a statute that automatically fired any state official with the power to arrest, investigate, try or sentence a citizen who used 'because it's illegal' as a reason for doing any of those things. There must always be a demonstrable detrimental effect somewhere in order for legal proceedings to be morally valid. There can be no such thing as a victimless crime: if it's victimless, it isn't a crime.

Offline izotz

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Re: Your coin was in the mail
« Reply #27 on: October 10, 2011, 05:50:40 PM »
At least in Spain, it is illegal to send legal tender money (coins / banknotes) by mail. You can send a letter by "registered letter" and you will be given €30 if it gets lost. But if you get the letter and you don't notice that something was stolen, you will not be able to ask for a compensation. I have some doubt what would happen if you notice the letter has been damaged and the weight is below what it was supposed to be, and you complain before accepting the envelope.
You can't ask for insurance, as you can't certify the value of something you are not allowed to send.
Sometimes I used the "declared value" service. I declared I was sending tokens or metal pieces.
Anyway, I sometimes get some coins / BU sets from different mints at home, and it seems they have not problem with them.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Your coin was in the mail
« Reply #28 on: October 12, 2011, 04:13:17 PM »
Overe here in DE it depends on the shipping service you use. Deutsche Post/DHL does not allow sending coins in plain regular letters - the customer is required to use something called Value Mail for that. And this even includes some insurance. Problem is, Value Mail can be used for domestic mail plus selected other destinations, but it won't work for all countries.

Also, not allowing coins does of course not mean you will be taken to court if you do it. ;) It merely implies that, if you do put coins in a letter, don't expect to get any money back. After all, most coin dealers in Germany will ship their coins using Deutsche Post. But they will have some extra insurance ...

Christian