Author Topic: The Worldwide Usage of the Effigy of Queen Elizabeth II  (Read 514265 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 895
Re: The Worldwide Usage of the Effigy of Queen Elizabeth II
« Reply #15 on: June 12, 2011, 06:53:27 PM »
So far, I have found two polities who have portrayed the Queen AND their coat of arms on the obverse of their coins - whether those coins circulate or not. They are Guernsey and Zambia. And the Isle of Man has occasionally used the triskele, an ancient local three-legged symbol, alongside the portrait of the Queen. Can we find any other similar examples?







 
« Last Edit: April 22, 2018, 05:16:50 PM by <k> »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 895
Re: The Worldwide Usage of the Effigy of Queen Elizabeth II
« Reply #16 on: June 12, 2011, 09:15:53 PM »
There are world issues, usually collector coins only, that show the Queen's effigy on the reverse of the coin. The one below is from Western Samoa and commemorates the Queen's Silver Jubillee.





In the case of the Papua New Guinea coin below, where the national coat of arms is actually on the obverse, it may look as if the Queen is gracing the obverse, though this is not the case.

If I were to include, in addition to those countries who have carried her effigy on the obverse, all those others who have portrayed her on the reverse of her coins, it may well be that all these countries would include a majority of all the countries in the world. If I were then to extend this to all those countries who have portrayed any member of the British Royal Family, then that number would probably be significantly increased (think "Diana").

 
« Last Edit: April 22, 2018, 05:18:34 PM by <k> »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 895
Re: The Worldwide Usage of the Effigy of Queen Elizabeth II
« Reply #17 on: June 25, 2011, 03:12:48 PM »
Probably the greatest anomaly in the usage of the Queen's effigy occurred in the case of Fiji, whose coinage continued to feature her effigy after independence in 1970. Until 1987 Fiji was a Commonwealth Realm, but after the coup of 1987 it became a republic. The Queen was still depicted on the coins until the end of 2012, but we must assume that that was in her capacity as Head of the Commonwealth.

Fiji is currently fully suspended from the Commonwealth, and this is not the first time it has happened. Currently, the reason given is that Fiji refuses to restore democracy before 2014. In March 2011, Fiji announced that it intended to replace the Queen's effigy on its coins and banknotes with designs depicting Fiji's flora and fauna. That announcement must be seen as symbolic of Fiji's future intentions, and that it no longer intends to return to the Commonwealth. From 2nd January 2013, the Queen's effigy will no longer appear on the country's coins or banknotes.

Fiji still includes the Union Flag of the UK within its own flag design, and many Fijians still feel loyal to the Queen, so the country is obviously conflicted in its attitude to Britain and the monarchy. For a more in depth look at the situation, visit this Wikipedia link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monarchy_of_Fiji
« Last Edit: December 13, 2012, 01:06:54 AM by <k> »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline malj1

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7 423
  • "illegitimi non carborundum"
    • Mals Machine Tokens
Re: The Worldwide Usage of the Effigy of Queen Elizabeth II
« Reply #18 on: December 25, 2011, 10:25:17 PM »
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 895
Re: The Worldwide Usage of the Effigy of Queen Elizabeth II
« Reply #19 on: December 25, 2011, 11:45:47 PM »
Spotted this one on eBay.

Nice one. In the early to mid 1960s, I used to be able to buy a small bar of chocolate for sixpence. A bar of a similar weight now would cost around 50 pence in the UK. So you could say that a pound then was worth about twenty pounds GBP in today's money. We had a ten shilling note too, but there was no banknote or circulating coin between 10 shillings and a half crown (two-and-a-half shillings) - the occasional crown was issued as a commemorative keepsake only. This suggests that the current five pound note ought to become a coin, but first we would have to get rid of the 1p and 2p coins, and then reduce the size of some other coins: the two pound coin and the 10p and 50p are now too big for what they're worth.
« Last Edit: December 27, 2011, 09:32:38 AM by translateltd »
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline Ukrainii Pyat

  • Collector of everything numismatic
  • Meritorious Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 624
Re: The Worldwide Usage of the Effigy of Queen Elizabeth II
« Reply #20 on: December 26, 2011, 02:36:40 PM »
Recently someone gave me a coin of 5 cents from Belize that is dated 2003 with that 1960's era portrait of QEII - surely a bit of an anachronism these days.  Sort of think they are economising and not doing a design change.
Донецк Украина Donets'k Ukraine

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 895
Re: The Worldwide Usage of the Effigy of Queen Elizabeth II
« Reply #21 on: December 26, 2011, 02:54:36 PM »
Recently someone gave me a coin of 5 cents from Belize that is dated 2003 with that 1960's era portrait of QEII - surely a bit of an anachronism these days.  Sort of think they are economising and not doing a design change.

Yes, Belize is the only Commonwealth realm that still uses the old Cecil Thomas crowned effigy. What the reason is, I don't know.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline Ukrainii Pyat

  • Collector of everything numismatic
  • Meritorious Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 624
Re: The Worldwide Usage of the Effigy of Queen Elizabeth II
« Reply #22 on: December 26, 2011, 04:00:28 PM »
I believe it has more to do with economy than anything else.  Why have retooling done to create new hubs and dies when you can continue to use the old hubs to make new dies with dates.  BTW I have an E. Caribbean States 2 cent coin from 1996 lying on my desk that has the Machin portrait on it - which were apparently using the Machin portrait up until 2002.
Донецк Украина Donets'k Ukraine

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 895
Re: The Worldwide Usage of the Effigy of Queen Elizabeth II
« Reply #23 on: December 26, 2011, 06:30:15 PM »
St. Helena and Ascension are still using the Maklouf portrait. In the UK, it was superseded by the Rank-Broadley effigy in 1998.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline Ukrainii Pyat

  • Collector of everything numismatic
  • Meritorious Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 624
Re: The Worldwide Usage of the Effigy of Queen Elizabeth II
« Reply #24 on: December 26, 2011, 06:44:33 PM »
I wonder why the possessions stamp out their own coinage other than for creating a cash cow by selling it to collectors?  I cannot imagine there are huge volumes of cash circulating on St. Helena or Ascenscion anyway.  Maybe that I am a pecuniary Scot, why pay good money to have money- when you can just import the UK's coinage and call it good? 

That said, I do sort of like the anachronistic portraits of QEII though.  Cannot imagine Canada or Australia or God forbid Great Britain getting away with such.
Донецк Украина Donets'k Ukraine

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 895
Re: The Worldwide Usage of the Effigy of Queen Elizabeth II
« Reply #25 on: December 27, 2011, 03:35:25 AM »
I wonder why the possessions stamp out their own coinage other than for creating a cash cow by selling it to collectors?

They relish their two identities: being British but also very different and distant from Britain. Their own coins and banknotes give them a sense of local identity. Unlike the Isle of Man, St Helena and Ascension have been very conservative with their issues:

Milestones in the decimal coinage of St. Helena-Ascension

 I cannot imagine there are huge volumes of cash circulating on St. Helena or Ascension anyway.  Maybe that I am a pecuniary Scot, why pay good money to have money- when you can just import the UK's coinage and call it good? 

They do use UK coins and notes too, but their own currency is self-financing. They run a currency board, which is backed 100% by reserves of the UK pound sterling. While their UK money is in the bank earning interest, they circulate their own money in its place, and with the interest so earnt, they can afford to have their own notes and coins produced for them, sell some of them, and still have a little over. Here's my topic on currency boards, central banks, currency unions, etc. :

There are only four basic currency systems in the world
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Online Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31 573
Re: The Worldwide Usage of the Effigy of Queen Elizabeth II
« Reply #26 on: December 29, 2011, 01:52:54 AM »
I suspect that while the interest should not be sneered at, an even more important aspect is "loss". Many coins will never be exchanged and end up in collections or as souvenirs. It is pretty normal that up to 70% of once circulating coins is not offered for exchange. That percentage is probably even higher for the fly specks.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 895
Re: The Worldwide Usage of the Effigy of Queen Elizabeth II
« Reply #27 on: January 16, 2013, 03:48:12 PM »
Here's a question: when did Gibraltar start using the title "Queen of Gibraltar" on its coins? The earliest I can find is 2010, but the title is not used on all coins.  So which coins is it restricted to?
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline andyg

  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3 740
  • DERBYS · UK
Re: The Worldwide Usage of the Effigy of Queen Elizabeth II
« Reply #28 on: January 16, 2013, 08:37:18 PM »

It's not on any circulation coins earlier than the 2011 Christmas 50p - until your post I didn't realise it was on the 2010 £5 coin - so I guess that was first (unless there is some NCLT before it)
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Offline <k>

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22 895
Re: The Worldwide Usage of the Effigy of Queen Elizabeth II
« Reply #29 on: January 16, 2013, 11:18:52 PM »
Thank you. I saw your World Coin News blog post about the latest circulation types and wondered about it. Gibraltar seems to make changes in piecemeal fashion, such as changing one or two circulation designs (e.g. the 1p and 5p), but not all of them. Makes it more interesting, I suppose.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.