World of Coins

Modern European coins except the euro => UK and Ireland => Topic started by: UK Decimal + on May 05, 2011, 11:56:45 AM

Title: Coins of England across two-thousand years
Post by: UK Decimal + on May 05, 2011, 11:56:45 AM
We all have some interesting coins in our collections.   Here is a chance to show some of them and tell us a little about them.   As long as they’re English in the general sense of the word, they will be welcome here; I intend starting other sections on the other countries of the United Kingdom – unless you do so first!

A landmark in numismatic history?   A trend of the times?   A token used during coin shortage?   Whatever you like as long as it’s English.   And, please, lots of variety and plenty of discussion about them.

If you are posting something old, think about adding details of size and weight as this will enhance the information given by your illustrations.   Please, from your own collection, although follow-up information or comparisons might need reference to other sources.   In the words of Captain Picard of the Enterprise “Let’s see what’s out there”.

Bill.

EDIT: Title changed
Title: England - Durotrige Stater
Post by: UK Decimal + on May 05, 2011, 12:15:43 PM
An English coin dating from just before the Roman conquest, or very soon thereafter.  The Durotriges (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Durotriges) lived in the part of southern England now known as Dorset and possibly northwards into Wiltshire and Somerset, with the what is now called the New Forest area  forming a natural barrier to the east.   Having read Martin Papworht’s “The Search for the Durotriges” (Published 2011, ISBN 978 0 7524 5737 6), plus local knowledge, I have formed a conclusion that the Durotriges were local communities with their main area being the coastal strip of Dorset from the coast and up to about 8-miles inland from the western edge of the New Forest and about as far west as Bridport.   There was certainly a community based at Hengistbury Head where there is believed to have been a mint.   The main part of the Hengistbury Head settlement was on the inland side, this being the south side of Christchurch (formerly Twynham) harbour.   About 10-miles west is Poole, the site, even a couple of millennia ago, of pottery production - Poole pottery is still famous.

This is a silver stater which might have been struck at Hengistbury Head.   The composition, I guess, might be rather more like debased silver and I will be trying to find out more about it.   From what I have read so far, it could well be a fairly late issue perhaps dating from early Romanisation days.   Again, from what I have read, it appears that the Hengistbury Head to Poole inhabitants were traders and welcomed the Romans as potential customers.   Further inland, but still within Dorset, is Cranborne Chase; this name is used by some to describe certain coins of the period although I have yet to establish which ones - there is evidence that the inhabitants of this, mainly farming, area put up some resistance to the Romans.   Mention is often made the Durotrige area extending into Wiltshire and Somerset, but from what I have read I think that this was more of an area of trade by the people living on the coastal strip - there are definitely differences in the form of settlements further into Dorset and still further north.

Where did they get their silver?   My thoughts go to the Mendip Hills in Somerset as being the nearest source, although as they were traders and the possibility of it being imported is not unreasonable.   From finds at Roman sites, it appears that Durotrige coins remained in use during at least part of the Roman period.

Here it is then, a Durotrige silver stater (or perhaps half- or quarter-stater) possibly dating from about the time of the birth of Christ or a little earlier.   Weight 3.6g and size 15.8 to 17.5mm.   It is not flat, but is convex/concave so we know which side is the obverse - the lower die (obverse) would be concave to hold the blank in place whilst being struck and this would form the convex obverse.   In common with all of their coins, there is no form of lettering.

Bill.
Title: England - City of London
Post by: UK Decimal + on May 05, 2011, 12:18:26 PM

By complete contrast to the above, here is a modern coin relating to London.   It could be argued that it also represents Wales and perhaps it should include a legend “Made in Wales”.

This is a “collector coin” depicting the Coat of Arms of the City of London, 2010 £1.

Bill.
Title: Re: UK Coins - England
Post by: UK Decimal + on May 05, 2011, 12:29:29 PM

OK, now it's your chance.   I'll post some more later but will give it a while to let any replies to the first two come in and let you have a chance to show some of your coins

Just keep the theme England or relating to England.   There's a gap of a couple of millennia to be filled!


Bill.
Title: Re: Coins of England across two-thousand years
Post by: Enlil on August 02, 2011, 07:20:30 AM
Here is my coin, although it proberly circulated in Australia instead.
Title: Re: Coins of England across two-thousand years
Post by: ghipszky on August 05, 2011, 01:36:42 AM
What a very beautiful coin!!
Ginger
Title: Re: Coins of England across two-thousand years
Post by: villa66 on August 07, 2011, 07:05:47 AM
 :) v.
Title: Re: Coins of England across two-thousand years
Post by: malj1 on August 07, 2011, 08:16:41 AM
That is indeed a lovely crown and hardly needs the name written there.

Here is a nice Queen Anne farthing; not 'The' 1714 one, but a pattern from 1713.

(http://web.archive.org/web/20140819032020/http://img198.imageshack.us/img198/5488/annepattern.jpg)

Reverse legend; PAX MISSA PER ORBIM - 'Peace sent throughout the world'.
Title: Re: Coins of England across two-thousand years
Post by: Coinsforever on August 07, 2011, 01:53:14 PM
Interesting thread .............

Cheers ;D
Title: Re: Coins of England across two-thousand years
Post by: UK Decimal + on August 07, 2011, 02:31:33 PM

Yes, after three months, it's working out in the way that I hoped it would.

We all have interesting things that we've collected over the years that perhaps aren't worth a topic of their own but which are worth showing here.   And it's not limited to actual coins!

Thank you all - keep them coming.

Bill.

Title: Re: Coins of England across two-thousand years
Post by: bgriff99 on October 15, 2014, 07:18:53 AM
This isn't much of a landmark, but it is the smallest legal tender denomination to be issued in Britain.   Made so in 1842.    And just found in a box of miscellaneous coins forgotten in the attic.
Title: Re: Coins of England across two-thousand years
Post by: malj1 on October 15, 2014, 11:48:07 AM
Many years ago I bought a Victorian desk and there, concealed in a secret compartment discovered soon after, I found two four shilling pieces, known also as the Barmaids ruin as they could often be passed as a crown in the dimly gas-lit 19th century pub.

Along with these were exam papers for 1887 and 1888 and the accompanying pass results for both papers leading me to speculate that a proud father may have presented these two coins to the young lad. One each year.

Somewhat tarnished after laying in this desk for around a century.
Title: Re: Coins of England across two-thousand years
Post by: constanius on October 15, 2014, 05:16:43 PM
Many years ago I bought a Victorian desk and there, concealed in a secret compartment discovered soon after, I found two four shilling pieces, known also as the Barmaids ruin as they could often be passed as a crown in the dimly gas-lit 19th century pub.

Along with these were exam papers for 1887 and 1888 and the accompanying pass results for both papers leading me to speculate that a proud father may have presented these two coins to the young lad. One each year.

What a lovely surprise for you at the time Malcolm :)

Pat
Title: Re: Coins of England across two-thousand years
Post by: bgriff99 on October 15, 2014, 11:56:21 PM
Very nice.    That portrait, though...   
Title: Re: Coins of England across two-thousand years
Post by: ghipszky on October 16, 2014, 03:03:29 AM
Such amazing coins to showcase London and other parts of England. Beautiful.
ghipszky
Title: Re: Coins of England across two-thousand years
Post by: davidrj on October 16, 2014, 02:43:55 PM
A Penny, approx 1253 Henry III type 5b Nicole Canterbury

(http://i593.photobucket.com/albums/tt14/microtome/pennyHenryIIItype5c.jpg) (http://s593.photobucket.com/user/microtome/media/pennyHenryIIItype5c.jpg.html)

and a  Farthing 1272-1307 Edward I London

(http://i593.photobucket.com/albums/tt14/microtome/1272-1307EdwardIfarthingLondon.jpg) (http://s593.photobucket.com/user/microtome/media/1272-1307EdwardIfarthingLondon.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Coins of England across two-thousand years
Post by: bgriff99 on October 16, 2014, 09:17:17 PM
WOW.   This is what I hoped to see on this thread.   Am I seeing the inscription of the first piece right, that R and I of HENRICUS are on top of each other?    I've always wondered why the ordinal was used on his coins for the first time (?) and then not again until Henry VII.    Was Dei Gratia not used before this?   

Do you have any from the Anarchy?
Title: Re: Coins of England across two-thousand years
Post by: Mycoins on January 18, 2015, 06:52:22 PM
Nice thread- I would not mind owning a George IV sovereign, but this farthing will have to do. A nice coin wich I like a lot.
Title: Re: Coins of England across two-thousand years
Post by: Figleaf on January 18, 2015, 08:26:46 PM
Am I seeing the inscription of the first piece right, that R and I of HENRICUS are on top of each other?

There's something weird going on there, but look at the N in ON on the other side. It's more like OI and jiddish hadn't been invented yet :) Neither spelling error is at the end of the legend, so stuff didn't get squashed together for lack of place. An illiterate die sinker, maybe?

Peter
Title: Re: Coins of England across two-thousand years
Post by: malj1 on January 18, 2015, 11:33:37 PM
Nice thread- I would not mind owning a George IV sovereign, but this farthing will have to do. A nice coin wich I like a lot.

Here is perhaps the next best thing, a gilt farthing of George IV 1827
Title: Re: Coins of England across two-thousand years
Post by: davidrj on January 19, 2015, 12:18:24 AM
There's something weird going on there, but look at the N in ON on the other side. It's more like OI and jiddish hadn't been invented yet :) Neither spelling error is at the end of the legend, so stuff didn't get squashed together for lack of place. An illiterate die sinker, maybe?

Peter

Sorry only just noticed this post

The N of ON is ligated to the C of CANT, as is the A and N within CANT.

Very common in medieval legends, accepted method of abbreviation at the time
Title: Re: Coins of England across two-thousand years
Post by: malj1 on December 10, 2015, 04:26:58 AM

Here is a nice Queen Anne farthing; not 'The' 1714 one, but a pattern from 1713.
Reverse legend; PAX MISSA PER ORBIM - 'Peace sent throughout the world'.

I recently bought another quite worn example of the pattern farthing from 1713; [J7J3]

I wonder how it came to be used so much.  ???