World of Coins

Modern Asian coins, pseudo coins and trade tokens => Japan, North and South Korea => Topic started by: Numii_Anglii on October 30, 2010, 11:34:21 AM

Title: 50 Sen of Japan 1910
Post by: Numii_Anglii on October 30, 2010, 11:34:21 AM
Please rate, admire, grade etc.. this 50 Sen of Meiji Year 43 = 1910 (Meiji Restoration = 3rd Jan. 1868 AD). I'd say a VF+?..

Isn't she beautiful?  :o

(http://i54.tinypic.com/dg2g3l.jpg)

(http://i52.tinypic.com/30dl6wy.jpg)

I would also like to know why regarding the Kanji-symbols that they seem to read backwards - i.e. the bottom left of the top picture has the symbols for "Great Japan" as hon-ni-ouki, and not Ni-hon-Ouki or Ouki Ni-hon (Japan/Nippon).

The centre of the top photo appears to be the obverse with the Japanese sun in the centre surrounded by a ring of lotus blossoms, a traditional Japanese symbol. The only other Kanji I am familiar with seem to read "Ju-go" which is the number fifteen and not "Go-Ju" or 50, the value. The three lines are "san" = Sen???

I cannot make out the other symbols on the obverse side.

On the Reverse side we have Go-Ju or fifty for the value and at bottom is a symbol I think I've seen elsewhere but don't know the meaning of.
What appear to be two branches of different plants tied at the bottom with a butterfly ribbon cover most of the rim with a lotus flowerhead at the top.
Title: Re: 50 Sen of Japan 1873!
Post by: andyg on October 30, 2010, 12:05:19 PM
Please rate, admire, grade etc.. this 50 Sen of Meiji Year 6 = 1873 (Meiji Restoration = 3rd Jan. 1868 AD). I'd say a VF+?..

I wonder why they made a coin in 1873 but dated it 1910?
Title: Re: 50 Sen of Japan 1873!
Post by: Numii_Anglii on October 30, 2010, 12:54:59 PM
I wonder why they made a coin in 1873 but dated it 1910?
Cos I can't read properly and misidentified it hah!
Title: Re: 50 Sen of Japan 1910
Post by: translateltd on October 30, 2010, 08:16:47 PM
Inscriptions on Japanese coins read right-to-left till 1948. The change came with the introduction of the new brass 1-yen coins (catalogue ref. Schön 46) that year.  The last of the 50-sen coins dated 1948 would still have been R-to-L.

One feature of Japanese (and Chinese, and technically, Korean) is that they can be read right-to-left, left-to-right and top-to-bottom.  L-to-R tends to be the norm now but newspapers, for instance, take advantage of the opportunity and their "columns" are often horizontal (vertical text), with either horizontal or vertical titles.  Signage on vehicles takes advantage of this opportunity, too, with the "first" character of the text often placed nearest the front of the vehicle, so as it drives past you the text passes you in the correct order, as it were.  So on the right side of the vehicle the text is R-to-L, and on the left side it's L-to-R.  I even saw the occasional taxi in Japan with IXAT (in Latin letters, as here) on the driver's door.

Title: Re: 50 Sen of Japan 1910
Post by: Figleaf on October 30, 2010, 09:30:41 PM
I have been informed that the text may indeed be read the other way around, but that in that case it makes no sense, so, as Martin says, they did it that way because they liked it that way. So there.

Peter
Title: Re: 50 Sen of Japan 1910
Post by: translateltd on October 30, 2010, 11:23:16 PM
There is probably a historical logic to the earlier use of R-to-L text: because text in columns was written top-to-bottom and right-to-left (i.e. starting at the top-right corner of the page), when horizontal text was adopted, the idea of starting at the right would have been retained.

The three characters for the country name would have their "Chinese" readings, by the way: Dai Nippon, not "Ookii Nippon/Nihon", even though the characters are the same.

Title: Re: 50 Sen of Japan 1910
Post by: Numii_Anglii on October 31, 2010, 02:03:46 AM
I am reading a manga (in English) with the start page at the traditionally wrong end! Most amusing, though luckily the writing still reads left to right...
Title: Re: 50 Sen of Japan 1910
Post by: translateltd on October 31, 2010, 02:23:59 AM

The centre of the top photo appears to be the obverse with the Japanese sun in the centre surrounded by a ring of lotus blossoms, a traditional Japanese symbol. The only other Kanji I am familiar with seem to read "Ju-go" which is the number fifteen and not "Go-Ju" or 50, the value. The three lines are "san" = Sen???

I cannot make out the other symbols on the obverse side.

On the Reverse side we have Go-Ju or fifty for the value and at bottom is a symbol I think I've seen elsewhere but don't know the meaning of.


Obverse: the characters read MEIJI YONJUU SANNEN = Meiji Year 43 = 1910, as has been established in between times.
Reverse: GOJUU SEN = 50 sen

Title: Re: 50 Sen of Japan 1910
Post by: gxseries on November 11, 2010, 01:15:34 PM
Why would it be strange to write from right to left? Hebrew and Arabic both still are written from right to left.
Title: Re: 50 Sen of Japan 1910
Post by: translateltd on November 11, 2010, 08:35:44 PM
Why would it be strange to write from right to left? Hebrew and Arabic both still are written from right to left.

I think the point was that recent Japanese coins read left-to-right, so it seemed unusual to find earlier coins in the same language reading in the opposite direction.