World of Coins

Events => Forum quizzes and games => Topic started by: Afrasi on February 25, 2010, 11:32:41 PM

Title: African Quiz
Post by: Afrasi on February 25, 2010, 11:32:41 PM
Who can tell me the country, the ruler and the denomination of this coin?

All answers are to find on the coin!

But not easy ...  ;D


Glory and honour to the winner! Good luck!
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: andyg on February 26, 2010, 01:27:47 PM
tricky....

Best guess Portuguese colonial - possibly minted in Goa then exported?
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: Afrasi on February 26, 2010, 05:30:08 PM
Portuguese colonial is correct. But which colony, which ruler and which denomination?
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: Harald on February 26, 2010, 06:00:14 PM
Mozambique, obviously 15 réis ;D
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: RHM22 on February 26, 2010, 06:01:26 PM
I will guess Angola - Pedro II - 1 soldo, and if that's right, I believe I will be elected president. :)
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: Afrasi on February 26, 2010, 06:20:54 PM
2 of 3 points for Harald. Only the ruler is now missing ...
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: andyg on February 26, 2010, 06:25:37 PM
John V.

This one was minted in Mozambique in 1725 I think, earlier coinage having been imported from Goa...
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: Afrasi on February 26, 2010, 06:35:12 PM
Yes! 1 point to England!

Left picture: M arms E for Mocambique.

Right picture shows something like

o
I I ?


o
I     as abbreviation of Joao.

Second I and reverse S (should be a 5 :shock: ) stand for 15 (Reis).
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: RHM22 on February 26, 2010, 06:48:14 PM
:D Glory and honor to AJG! African coins are way too confusing for me.
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: Afrasi on February 26, 2010, 07:26:12 PM
John V. This one was minted in Mozambique in 1725 I think, earlier coinage having been imported from Goa...

I think this one was produced at Goa, too, if you compare it with the piece of 15 Bazarucos of Goa, KM # 88.

Do you kow which coins of Goa did circulate in Mocambique?
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: andyg on February 26, 2010, 07:51:26 PM
My 1725 Mozambique source is "Ancient ruins and vanished civilisations of southern Africa", R Summers, 1971, with thanks to google books.  He quotes a source for this reference but I cannot get that page on google books >:(
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: andyg on February 27, 2010, 01:39:45 AM
This book is quite an interesting read on coins of Goa,
Contributions to the study of Indo-Portuguese numismatics By Joseph Gerson Cunha, 1880 (http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=WnsDuuNKAeAC&pg=PA81&dq=portuguese+coins+africa&cd=4#v=onepage&q=portuguese%20coins%20africa&f=false)
It didn't exactly tell me what I was looking for, but quite interesting nevertheless.  Just a shame that only pages 80-94 are previewed.
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: Afrasi on February 27, 2010, 11:22:22 AM
Very helpful text! The triangle Harar-DiegoSuarez-Goa (including Mombasa, Kilwa, Mogadisho, Pemba, Zanzibar, Mocambique, Oman and others) is numismatically very interesting.
But:
My English-German dictionary with about 1,500 pages does not know the word "tutenag". Also I cannot understand the difference between "tin" and "pewter", both is chemical "Sn" as far as I know.
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: andyg on February 27, 2010, 01:16:33 PM
Tutenag : A name given in India to the metallic zinc. The Chinese copper is also called by this name, which is alloyed with zinc, and forms a very hard and white metal, but little disposed to tarnish.

Pewter : is tin alloyed with various other metals to make it harder.  See here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pewter)

I'd read that coins were made in Goa then exported to Africa before, but I can't find where I'd read that....
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: RHM22 on February 27, 2010, 01:17:27 PM
I don't know much about metallurgy, but I've tried melting a few different things, and I know that pewter is almost completely zinc with either lead, bronze or antimony thrown in (as a stabilizer, I suppose). Maybe that's why pewter is the same. The chemical symbol for zinc is Zn by the way.

Not to change the subject, but would pewter be known as 'spelter' in Germany?
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: andyg on February 27, 2010, 01:24:00 PM
I don't know much about metallurgy, but I've tried melting a few different things, and I know that pewter is almost completely zinc with either lead, bronze or antimony thrown in (as a stabilizer, I suppose). Maybe that's why pewter is the same. The chemical symbol for zinc is Zn by the way.

Pewter is mainly tin not zinc!!
Spelter is a synonym of zinc.
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: Afrasi on February 27, 2010, 01:45:39 PM
There exists no word "spelter" in German. My sources are the actual Duden, Merck's Warenlexikon (a lexicon of trading goods of the 30s) and my weak brain ...  8)

I know the chemical symbol of Zinc, but - as you did write in your second post - pewter is hardened tin by the way.  ;)
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: Prosit on February 27, 2010, 02:07:22 PM
In general pewter is mostly tin with small varying amounts of copper, antimony, bismuth or silver.  It can even have lead but lead is a no-no for finer pewter and most consumer products.

I have a small home-made furnace and can melt aluminum easily and copper and brass with a little more effort.  Pewter is fairly easy to do.  Working with brass can be deadly if precautions are not taken as it contains zinc.  Zinc is a nasty medal to work with.

Dale
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: RHM22 on February 27, 2010, 02:25:01 PM
Pewter is mainly tin not zinc!!
Spelter is a synonym of zinc.

:P Apparently the morning does not suit me well! Either that or my mind is going.
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: RHM22 on February 27, 2010, 02:28:23 PM
Anyway, what I meant to say was that pewter is mostly tin, so maybe that's why the chemical symbol is the same.
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: Austrokiwi on February 27, 2010, 06:06:25 PM
Spelter is a synonym of zinc.

I think that is the less common definition, I understood that spelter was an alloy of zinc used in soldering and brazing. I suppose its meaning depends on what you are most experienced with.
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: Afrasi on November 05, 2013, 07:55:24 PM
New information: The coin has been struck at the Ilha de Mocambique - like Andy stated before.
Title: Re: African Quiz
Post by: malj1 on November 05, 2013, 10:37:05 PM
I captured this image of some Cornish tin ingots from the TV program 'Antiques Roadshow' just recently. Cornwall was a big producer of tin in bygone days.