World of Coins

Design and designing => Coin characteristics => Topic started by: RHM22 on January 10, 2010, 12:28:42 AM

Title: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: RHM22 on January 10, 2010, 12:28:42 AM
I noticed a discussion about spelling mistakes on Dutch coins in another thread, and that gave me the idea for a thread discussing spelling and/or grammatical mistakes on coins. One glaring example I can present would be coins of the presidential series minted for Micronesia. I'll post some pictures if I can find them. If anyone else has examples, I'd like to see them!
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: RHM22 on January 10, 2010, 12:36:47 AM
Here are the images, courtesy of the World Coin Gallery (http://worldcoingallery.com/):

This is a rather ridiculous mistake. It says "GEDRGE" where it should "George".

(http://worldcoingallery.com/countries/nmc/mic-pres01.jpg)

This is another mistake. It says "William H. Henry" where it should say "William Henry Harrison" or "William H. Harrison".

(http://worldcoingallery.com/countries/nmc/mic-pres09.jpg)

This is probably the biggest mistake of the three. It says "David D. Elsenhower". First of all, David is the middle name, not the first. Secondly, it should read "Eisenhower", not "Elsenhower". The correct spelling would be "Dwight David Eisenhower" or "Dwight D. Eisenhower".

(http://worldcoingallery.com/countries/nmc/mic-pres34.jpg)

Obviously, whoever designed these coins did not speak much English, which begs the question, why did he/she design these coins? It seems that with all the people in Micronesia, they could have found someone who could speak or read enough English to spell the words on their official coinage correctly.

You can view the entire Micronesia presidential series here (http://worldcoingallery.com/countries/galleries/Micronesia.html).
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: RHM22 on January 10, 2010, 01:15:10 AM
Does anyone know what the "S" mintmark stands for? I can't think of where that could be. I know it's not San Francisco!
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Figleaf on January 10, 2010, 01:15:49 AM
It depends on what you call a spelling error.

Is "stiver", instead of "stuiver" a spelling error or the recognition of an Anglophone that he's unable to pronounce the word properly and he is therefore helpfully and completely free of any charge changing the spelling? What to say about the denomination "cash" on Chinese coins, when the correct pronunciation is more like "kas" and "cash" is another British invention? How about the consistent use of "cent" for the plural on euro coins, which should actually be "cents" in French and the way the Irish pronounce English, but "cent" in German or Dutch?

Peter
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: RHM22 on January 10, 2010, 01:19:47 AM
I think the Euro coins should be language-neutral like Swiss circulating coins. For instance, they should use "5 Euro C." instead of "cents".
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Figleaf on January 10, 2010, 01:33:35 AM
That's not a solution, I am afraid. First, eurocent is wrong (though helpful to distinguish them from other people's cents), second, some euro countries use different characters. Greece is the only one now, but one day, Bulgaria will be another example. The fact of the matter is that the French happily use centimes, the Spanish centimos and the Irish cents while the Germans and the Dutch use cent (each pronouncing the word differently) and nobody cares. The EU is not based on the melting pot model.

Peter
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: RHM22 on January 10, 2010, 01:42:34 AM
I understand the Greek dilemma. I suppose the only real solution would be to use a Euro cent symbol instead of lettering. The numerals are universal amongst the Euro countries, so that shouldn't be a problem.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: asm on January 10, 2010, 02:47:45 AM
I'm not aware of any spelling errors on Indian Coins. However Bank Notes issued both during the British occupation as well as Republic India bank notes have had spelling error. And what about the Rs 50 note that had the flagstaff on the Parliament building but no flag. Not a gramatical mistake nor a spelling error but a blunder in any case.

Amit
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: RHM22 on January 10, 2010, 02:59:37 AM
Here's an interesting example. It's an American civil war token. The obverse usually features a flying union flag with the words "The flag of our union". Here's one of the more famous reverse types courtesy of Civil War Token Resources (http://cwt.michigano.org/):

(http://cwt.michigano.org/PTFull/0414%201%20uc.jpg)

Notice the incorrect spelling of the word "spot".

The phrase comes from a letter by John Adams Dix (then secretary of the Treasury) to a Revenue Cutter named Caldwell.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Abhay on January 10, 2010, 05:59:40 AM
I'm not aware of any spelling errors on Indian Coins. However Bank Notes issued both during the British occupation as well as Republic India bank notes have had spelling error. And what about the Rs 50 note that had the flagstaff on the Parliament building but no flag. Not a gramatical mistake nor a spelling error but a blunder in any case.

Amit

Dear Amit, you are wrong here. In fact, there is a 10 paisa coin of 1988, where instead of "BHARAT", "MARAT" was engraved. This coin is listed at KM # 40.2

Abhay
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: asm on January 10, 2010, 06:34:01 AM
Abhay,
Thanks for the info. Will need to keep an eye for this one.
Amit
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Bimat on January 10, 2010, 06:50:21 AM
In fact, there is a 10 paisa coin of 1988, where instead of "BHARAT", "MARAT" was engraved. This coin is listed at KM # 40.2
That's the coin which still eludes me.The word 'Bharat' was wrongly spelled as 'Marat',but in Devanagari.However,the 'BHA' (भ) and 'MA'(म ) are quite similar in Devanagari script,so the error is not easily recognizable.These error coins were minted at Calcutta (now Kolkata) mint (As usual ;D)

Aditya
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: ciscoins on January 10, 2010, 07:32:45 AM
In Russia I remember only two coins:

1. 2 kopeks 1762. It was engraved by some foreigner who didn't know Russian, and so he wrote N instead of И - (КОПЕNKN instead of КОПЕЙКИ)
http://www.m-dv.ru/catalog/id,44/prohod.html

2. Konstantin's 1 rouble 1825 where the name of the emperor was written without letter Ъ (КОНСТАНТИН instead of КОНСТАНТИНЪ) - just like in modern, post-revolution orthography.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: asm on January 10, 2010, 07:38:04 AM
That's the coin which still eludes me.The word 'Bharat' was wrongly spelled as 'Marat',but in Devanagari.However,the 'BHA' (भ) and 'MA'(म ) are quite similar in Devanagari script,so the error is not easily recognizable.These error coins were minted at Calcutta (now Kolkata) mint (As usual ;D)

Aditya
Aditya,
Abhay's coin clearly shows a dot (or is it a diamond?) below the date. A product of Noida / Mumbai mint? or was this one of the foreign mints who were subcontracted for producing these coins due to severe shortages around the same time?

Amit
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Abhay on January 10, 2010, 08:42:07 AM
Aditya,
Abhay's coin clearly shows a dot (or is it a diamond?) below the date. A product of Noida / Mumbai mint? or was this one of the foreign mints who were subcontracted for producing these coins due to severe shortages around the same time?

Amit

The image of 10 Paisa coin with the dot is from the normal "BHARAT" coin. I just checked and there is no dot on the "MARAT" coin. So I think, what Aditya says is correct. Even the catalogue mentions 1988(C) and 1989(C), (C) for Calcutta.

Abhay
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Bimat on January 10, 2010, 09:48:01 AM
Aditya,
Abhay's coin clearly shows a dot (or is it a diamond?) below the date. A product of Noida / Mumbai mint? or was this one of the foreign mints who were subcontracted for producing these coins due to severe shortages around the same time?
This particular coin was struck by Calcutta mint,but the same coin was also struck at Canadian mint in Winnipeg (or in Ottawa?),which is without any error.They have 'C' mint mark below the date.Since catalog uses 'C' for Calcutta mint,it is often mistaken as those error coins were minted at Canadian mint.

Aditya
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Austrokiwi on January 10, 2010, 10:14:59 AM
With a 200+ year minting history the 1780 Maria Theresa Taler has a number of known error coins.  I have two in my collection.  The first one is a recognized error that occurred twice in the first half of the 19th century. The coin here is the more common ( of the two) Vienna Upper Arms strike. The error: the normal "AVST DUX" on the reverse is spelt “AVST DVX” the rarer coin was minted in Milan.
(http://usera.ImageCave.com/Austrokiwi/hafner%2020%20rev.gif.jpg)


The next post will be of a rare 20th century spelling error.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Austrokiwi on January 10, 2010, 10:19:44 AM
This next spelling mistake MTT is attributed in Walter Hafner's Lexicon of the Maria Theresa Taler as a 1920s Vienna Strike. I have discussed this coin with Herr Hafner (by email) and he informed me he now believes it to be a 1960 Vienna strike. It’s a subtle error that many people miss: ARCHID has been miss-spelt as ARGHID

(http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m93/eurocoins/Knipse1l_zps5a7457b7.jpg) (http://s102.photobucket.com/user/eurocoins/media/Knipse1l_zps5a7457b7.jpg.html)

Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: translateltd on January 10, 2010, 11:27:22 AM
What to say about the denomination "cash" on Chinese coins, when the correct pronunciation is more like "kas" and "cash" is another British invention?

I don't know of any Chinese word that sounds even vaguely like "kas" - Chinese has no syllables ending in -s.  I think we got the word "cash" from one of the southern Indian languages (Tamil?), and have no idea at all what the proper etymology is in relation to the Chinese brass coins that we are all familiar with.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: translateltd on January 10, 2010, 11:28:50 AM
Is it my eyes, or do those Micronesian things also say UBERTY instead of LIBERTY in the mottoes?

Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: chrisild on January 10, 2010, 11:46:00 AM
I understand the Greek dilemma. I suppose the only real solution would be to use a Euro cent symbol instead of lettering. The numerals are universal amongst the Euro countries, so that shouldn't be a problem.

No reason to use a cent symbol. The official names of the two units, in singular and plural, are "euro" and "cent". If anybody - whether in the euro area or elsewhere - wants to adapt the terms to whatever is preferred locally, fine. So let them use "euri" or "euros", "centime(s)", "eurocent" or "sentti". In Ireland some like to append a plural-s while others don't. Here in Germany some pronounce the small unit "tsent" while most say "sent". So what? :)

So the coins will say euro/cent, without any regional variations. The only exception, as Peter wrote, is euro countries that use "non-Latin" characters. So Greece (with the Greek alphabet) and later Bulgaria (with the Cyrillic alphabet) may repeat the face value on the country-specific sides. Austria currently does it too, but if they ever modify their national sides, that would need to be removed.

As for spelling errors on coins, one came up a few days ago in a quiz question: The hexagonal 2 fr coin minted in Philadelphia for Belgian Congo (1943) said "Belgish" on the Dutch language type, instead of "Belgisch".

(http://worldcoingallery.com/countries/img11/220-25.jpg)
(Image: worldcoingallery.com)

German coins from Baden said "Grosherzog" instead of "Grossherzog" (Grand Duke) until 1907. But that was not a spelling error - just a regional variety. And then there is the Johannes Brahms collector coin that the GDR issued in 1972 - no spelling error but it depicts notes from one of his symphonies, and one of the five notes is wrong ...

Christian
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: andyg on January 11, 2010, 08:48:49 PM
I don't know of any Chinese word that sounds even vaguely like "kas" - Chinese has no syllables ending in -s.  I think we got the word "cash" from one of the southern Indian languages (Tamil?), and have no idea at all what the proper etymology is in relation to the Chinese brass coins that we are all familiar with.

The OED states that the word is Tamil in origin, translated into English it would be Cass, but ended up as Cash due to confusion with the already existing word.

Wikipedia has that the small coins were called 'Wen' in Chinese but I'm not at all sure what the source is for this.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: translateltd on January 11, 2010, 09:25:40 PM
"Wen" (pronounced a bit like "one") would make sense, as that's the character commonly used for them (best description I can think of is that it looks a bit like a flat roof with a tilted chimney an an X below - I can't do characters on my laptop!); the same character is pronounced "mon" in Japanese and "mun" in Korean, and these are the standard catalogue terms for the "cash" coins produced in those countries.  I suspect the Vietnamese term (van) also maps to the same character.



Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Figleaf on January 11, 2010, 09:50:55 PM
AFAIK the Tamil word is Kasu. There's a Dutch colonial coin known as tammekas (Tamil Kasu).

Peter
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: andyg on January 11, 2010, 10:15:28 PM
"Wen" (pronounced a bit like "one") would make sense, as that's the character commonly used for them


We have a problem though, 'Wen' is the Pinyin translation of this character 文,
Pinyin I think though is quite modern, whilst the character is not....
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Figleaf on January 11, 2010, 10:27:54 PM
Found in dictionary: Chinees (simplified) > Engels.
文   [wen] Pinyin
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: andyg on January 11, 2010, 10:44:01 PM
Found in dictionary: Chinees (simplified) > Engels.
文   [wen] Pinyin
  • a composition; an article
  • a language
  • civil; civilian
  • literature; culture; education
  • elegant; gentle; refined
  • a former monetary unit
  • to owe nothing
  • a Chinese family name
  • to cover up; to conceal; to gloss over

As I understand it the character means those things, 'Wen' though is a modern translation, so before Pinyin the translation may not have been 'wen' though the character has always been used.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: translateltd on January 12, 2010, 03:58:55 AM

We have a problem though, 'Wen' is the Pinyin translation of this character 文,
Pinyin I think though is quite modern, whilst the character is not....

That's the character.  I don't see the problem, as the name for the coin is 文 (in China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam), and it's just pronounced differently in these countries.  The "English" transliteration is not highly relevant as long as it gets the sound across.  (From memory, I think the old Wade-Giles transliteration used "wen" for this character (or maybe wên), so it doesn't differ drastically from Pinyin, which dates from around the 1950s.)  In other words, how we transcribe it doesn't alter the term that may have been used in the home territories for many centuries.

(Please, no smarties go telling me that Korea and Vietnam don't use characters to any great extent these days, if at all.  I know.  The words in their current writing systems still for the most part represent an underlying Chinese character, regardless.)

The key point, which led to this discussion, is that "wen" sounds nothing like "cash" :-)  However, the anglicised "cash" form appears to have been readily used in China proper in the early 20th century, as it is found on machine-struck bronze coins, often alongside equivalent Chinese text containing the character 文 - isn't cut-and-paste wonderful, btw?
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: chrisild on January 12, 2010, 10:57:22 AM
Two more spelling errors. The first one is a 1 peso coin from Argentina  which depicts an old Argentinian coin. The original piece, and most of those 1 peso coins, use the correct spelling PROVINCIAS. But this 1995 variety (minted in Llantrisant) says PROVINGIAS:

(http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m93/eurocoins/provingias_zps501caf31.jpg) (http://s102.photobucket.com/user/eurocoins/media/provingias_zps501caf31.jpg.html)

Then there is a 5 piastres coin from Egypt (1972/1392) which says UNICFE instead of UNICEF. See attachment.

The spelling "KONINGRIJK" vs "KONINKRIJK" (see initial post) is discussed here:
http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,5413.0.html#msg33906

Now as for those pieces "from" Micronesia, well, don't know whether they are actually coins. The Schön says they are private issues ...

Christian
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Figleaf on January 12, 2010, 01:10:31 PM
There is a variety of the British sixpence 1879 with DRITTANIAR. The whole mintage (10 188) with the wrong inscription was sent to Cyprus. Of these, 6160 were returned to London when the error was discovered.

Peter
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: bart on January 12, 2010, 01:33:29 PM
There are also 2 coins of the Philippines: 10 sentimos where PANDAKA PYGMEA stands instead of PYGMAEA and 50 sentimos with PITHECOBHAGA JEFFERYI instead of PITHECHOPHAGA JEFFERYI

Bart

pictures from worldcoingallery
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Bimat on January 31, 2010, 05:10:26 PM
One more-BBasil (Brazil) 1000 Ries 1922,KM522.1
(https://www.joelscoins.com/images/brazil522.jpg)
(Image from Joels Coins)

Aditya
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: RHM22 on January 31, 2010, 09:58:02 PM
Great additions! I especially like "BBASIL".
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Figleaf on January 31, 2010, 10:46:12 PM
Here is a spelling error on purpose.

You are supposed to think you are looking at a Frisian duit. The coat of arms is the same, The text is FRI SIA. Except that it isn't. The legend is FRI CIR.

At independence, the Republic was a protestant nation bordering the catholic Southern Netherlands. The South consisted mainly of the Spanish Netherlands, the prince-bishopric of Liège and Luxembourg, but there were also some very small semi-independent areas along the religion border. One of these was the county of Reckheim (http://translate.google.nl/translate?js=y&prev=_t&hl=nl&ie=UTF-8&layout=1&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fde.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FGrafschaft_Reckheim&sl=de&tl=en) (sorry for machine translation, this lemma is not available in English). It was nominally part of the Holy Roman Empire, but in reality a minute enclave in the Spanish Netherlands.

The counts of Reckheim operated a mint that produced coins looking a lot like coins of the Republic, but severely underweight. The count cynically abused the illiteracy of the poor and employed professional smugglers and shady merchants to circulate his coppers. However, he covered his behind by making errors he could explain. The text FRI CIR on this coin could be explained as Fredericus Romanorum Imperator Comitus In Reckheim, referring to the emperor and the count. The county's coat of arms was a single climbing lion, but that was apparently close enough for the judges of the (catholic and Habsburg) imperial court.

Peter
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: chrisild on February 12, 2010, 06:29:25 PM
Chilean mint boss loses job after coin spelling error
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/us_and_americas/article7024750.ece

(Edit) Here is a photo of such a piece from, umm, the Daily Mail website:

(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2010/02/12/article-1250580-08431576000005DC-930_468x425.jpg)

Christian
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Figleaf on February 12, 2010, 10:44:29 PM
Rightly so. A mintmaster is paid to bear final responsibility. If something goes wrong, he should take the responsibility and leave, whether or not he could have done anything to prevent the error. I wouldn't go looking for this, but if it were offered to me at a reasonable price, I would fall for it because of the unusual story.

O'Higgins is an unlikely name for a Chilean. Here is how wikipedia explains it: O'Higgins was born in the Chilean city of Chillán in 1778, the illegitimate son of Ambrosio O'Higgins, Marquis of Osorno, a Spanish officer born in County Sligo in Ireland, who became governor of Chile and later viceroy of Peru. His mother was Isabel Riquelme, a prominent local lady—the daughter of Don Simón Riquelme y Goycolea, a member of the Chillán Cabildo, or council.

Peter
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: chrisild on February 13, 2010, 02:26:31 PM
Out of curiosity, what do you see here?
http://www.bcentral.cl/eng/banknotes-coins/coins/m0050.htm

Looks like CHIIE to me. But elsewhere I read that this error can be found (only?) on the pieces dated 2008. According to the reverse depicted at the central bank's site, that piece is dated 1995. Hmm, maybe they combined images of two different pieces.

(Update) According to this article (http://www.fd.nl/artikel/14192305/topman-chileense-munt-ontslagen-spelfout) (in Dutch), people currently pay 30,000 pesos (~€42) for such an error piece.

Christian
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: translateltd on February 17, 2010, 08:26:32 PM
Here's one on a medal that I had forgotten about.  The ANA's 113th anniversary medal, 2004.  Someone consulted me about the translation of "gateway to the west" at the time - not that I was qualified to suggest anything - and I don't think I actually had any input in the end.  Regardless - and apart from any discussion about the whether the translation is actually correct (a French colleague suggested "Porte pour l'Ouest" would be better) - the final medal has Quest rather than Ouest.  It doesn't seem to have been picked up, and isn't mentioned as far as I can see in the catalogue of recent ANA medals that was published in the Feb 2010 ANA "Numismatist".

Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Figleaf on February 17, 2010, 10:37:29 PM
 :D :D :D

BTW My translator daughter says it should have been "Portail pour l'Ouest".

Peter
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: translateltd on February 17, 2010, 10:56:31 PM
:D :D :D

BTW My translator daughter says it should have been "Portail pour 'Ouest".

Peter

Yep, there will be plenty of different opinions on how best to translate the expression.  My French colleague was a professional translator too :-)  The key point is that "Quest" should never have got through - I suspect someone's spell-checker did an automatic adjustment in the communication chain somewhere ...

Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: RHM22 on February 18, 2010, 08:12:49 PM
In regards to the Chilean coin, is the word "chiie" possibly an offensive word in that country? From the way the article was written, it sounded like it was worse than just a spelling error.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: chrisild on February 18, 2010, 08:59:29 PM
Don't think it is in Spanish. But heck, there are universities out there that have entire departments dedicated to it. ;D

Dept. de Chiie Organique
http://myais.fsktm.um.edu.my/view/corp_creators/Universite_de_Yaounde,_Cameroon,_Dept._de_Chiie_Organique.html

Christian
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: RHM22 on February 18, 2010, 09:04:48 PM
Well, at any rate, it would be a nice addition to any collection misspelled South American coins. First BBASIL, now CHIIE.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Bimat on February 19, 2010, 06:42:37 AM
About 1.5 million ChIIe coins have been struck,but no one knows how many have been put into circulation.I would like to have one,definitely :D

Check also: http://english.cctv.com/program/newshour/20100214/102187.shtml   ;D

Aditya
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: RHM22 on February 19, 2010, 01:30:10 PM
About 1.5 million ChIIe coins have been struck,but no one knows how many have been put into circulation.I would like to have one,definitely :D

Check also: http://english.cctv.com/program/newshour/20100214/102187.shtml   ;D

Aditya

I would like to have one as well, but I predict that the prices will be very high until everyone forgets about this news story.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: translateltd on March 01, 2010, 08:41:20 AM
And another that I had forgotten about, until I saw an image in the March COIN News, in which the author happily tells us that "VIVANT REGINA" translates to 'long live the Queen'".  Erm, no, it doesn't.  Vivant is plural, Regina singular, so I suspect the original designer got his Latin a bit muxed ip ...

At a pinch, it could mean "Long may they live, O Queen", but why anyone would want to say that, I have no idea.

Oh, the token is a penny of E. De Carle & Co., Dunedin, New Zealand.  While the token is to the correct specifications for the post-1860 bronze pennies, they caused lots of confusion in a colony that still had lots of the old copper coins and copper coin-sized tokens in circulation, to the extent that De Carle published a letter in February 1863 recommending that his tokens circulate as halfpence.

Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: translateltd on March 01, 2010, 08:49:02 AM
A quick Google for Vivant Regina offers a possible solution:

Vivant Regina et Princeps = Long live the Queen and Prince

ergo, someone just deleted the "et princeps" bit and forgot to adjust the verb at the same time.  Best explanation I can think of.

Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: andyg on March 04, 2010, 11:41:10 PM
Here's an older coin with a spelling error... ;D
It's from Munster.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: chrisild on March 05, 2010, 12:00:23 AM
That is not a spelling error but a smelling error. ;D Good one!

Christian
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Figleaf on March 06, 2010, 04:08:09 PM
My boss once made a similar error repeatedly in his ... uhhh ... imperfect German when reporting on a hunting trip, with several forms of the verb "scheissen". :P

Peter
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: chrisild on March 06, 2010, 11:07:13 PM
Oh, you people are so vulgar. 8) By the way, in German (mostly Northern Germany) you may hear the word "Schiet" ... and then you go to the nearby Netherlands and notice that they have the verb "schieten". Now that is confusing.

Christian
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Bimat on August 08, 2013, 02:16:08 PM
(http://worldcoingallery.com/countries/nmc/mic-pres01.jpg)

The Federated States of Micronesia, 1 dollar, 2004.  This is a collector coin only.

Micronesia is a self-governing state, in free association with the USA. It uses the US dollar.

The four stars on the coin represent the states in the federation: Chuuk, Pohnpei, Kosrae and Yap.

Notice the spelling of George (GEDROE instead of GEORGE). The spelling mistake was intentional, as the other coins from the series also have some kind of spelling mistake in President's name!

Aditya
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: paisepagal on August 08, 2013, 02:23:54 PM
Looks like there is yet another mistake.... "UBERTY"
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Bimat on August 08, 2013, 02:39:47 PM
Looking at the complete set of those Presidential series here (http://worldcoingallery.com/countries/galleries/Micronesia.html), there are indeed some coins without spelling mistake. ;)

Aditya
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: canadacoin on July 04, 2014, 03:07:53 AM
50 Ore 2011 "reversed" digits
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Miner on July 04, 2014, 09:49:32 AM
Liberia, an error in the word ARCHAEOPTERYX, letter T instead of the letter R
Congo, helmet Tereshkova written CCCC instead of the СССР
Somalia, an error in Galileo Galilei

(http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m93/eurocoins/rpe_zpsiqteje3p.jpg)

(http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m93/eurocoins/vostok_zpsqf4ufqcg.jpg)

(http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m93/eurocoins/galileo_zpsapfbtyyo.jpg)
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: canadacoin on July 05, 2014, 01:39:18 AM
In 1994, Croatia minted 1 Kuna coins depicting small Nightingale bird (Luscinia megarhynchos), also known as Rufous Nightingale, known for its powerful and beautiful songs. As we can see name of the genus is misspelled with two N’s. Spelling error was corrected in the subsequent issue, in 1996.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: eurocoin on July 10, 2014, 06:25:42 PM
I just came across this spelling error on a 5 dollars coin of the Northern Mariana Islands of 2004, instead of staatSSekretär there is written staatSekretär.

(http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m93/eurocoins/000044591_zps4e9a0a39.jpg) (http://s102.photobucket.com/user/eurocoins/media/000044591_zps4e9a0a39.jpg.html)

(http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m93/eurocoins/staat_zps10f9fde8.jpg) (http://s102.photobucket.com/user/eurocoins/media/staat_zps10f9fde8.jpg.html)

Later that same year, the same company minted a 250 francs coin for Togo to commemorate the same occasion. On this coin the spelling error was corrected.

(http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m93/eurocoins/7006-front_zps36f2a8fe.jpg) (http://s102.photobucket.com/user/eurocoins/media/7006-front_zps36f2a8fe.jpg.html)

(http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m93/eurocoins/staats_zps7feedbb3.jpg) (http://s102.photobucket.com/user/eurocoins/media/staats_zps7feedbb3.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: chrisild on July 10, 2014, 07:06:15 PM
Hehe, nice find!  :D

Christian
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: eurocoin on July 11, 2014, 04:12:33 PM
10 Lekë Albania 1992 minted to commemorate the 1992 Olympics, on the coat of arms is written "maI" in german istead of "maJ" in albanian.

(http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m93/eurocoins/1992_zps2ea6f314.jpg) (http://s102.photobucket.com/user/eurocoins/media/1992_zps2ea6f314.jpg.html)

(http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m93/eurocoins/zoom_zpsb218e324.jpg) (http://s102.photobucket.com/user/eurocoins/media/zoom_zpsb218e324.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: eurocoin on July 16, 2014, 09:22:48 PM
Another mistake I just came across on a 2 Dollars coin of the Cook Islands of 2006.
Photographie should be photography or was this planned because the first photo was taken in France ?
If so, it doesn't make sense at all and it is still incorrect.

(http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m93/eurocoins/c45374_a_zps009de532.jpg) (http://s102.photobucket.com/user/eurocoins/media/c45374_a_zps009de532.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: canadacoin on July 17, 2014, 12:52:12 AM
Great find. Including 100 escudos 1999, Portugal, country name "Portugusa" instead of "Portuguesa"
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: chrisild on July 17, 2014, 01:51:25 AM
As for the Cook Islands piece, oh well. :)  By the time that error piece saw the light of day, they probably had forgotten about it anyway. Suggest a theme and a design, let them make some profit, and the Cook Islands will issue almost anything you like.

The Portuguese error I find much more interesting. Since it is not really expensive, the mint must have issued quite a few before the mistake was noticed ...

Christian
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: eurocoin on February 18, 2015, 09:34:02 AM
(http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m93/eurocoins/250franc_zpsb3996270.jpg)

Baldvin should be baldvini or baldvinvs.
See also here: http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,28094.msg195637.html#msg195637
Thanks to <k> for the explanation.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: eurocoin on February 18, 2015, 09:38:42 AM
(http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m93/eurocoins/10-Dollars-End-of-Christian-Persecution-313_zps7d763aca.jpg)

Liberia, 10 Dollars, 2001. PerCecution instead of PerSecution.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: eurocoin on May 23, 2015, 03:26:48 PM
(http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m93/eurocoins/djiboutii_zpsp2opmk6w.jpg)(http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m93/eurocoins/djiboutii2_zpsb56rvivx.jpg)


Djibouti, 100 Francs, 1994. Olympic Games 1996.
RepubliquL instead of RepubliquE, correct version exists too.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: eurocoin on January 23, 2018, 12:58:49 PM
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4608/24983252517_1b7f8ec0fa_o.jpg)(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4717/24983252587_5d1ccf47f2_o.jpg)

North Korea, 20 Won, 2010. Gymanstic instead of Gymnastic.
Same mistake on all coins in the series this coin is part of.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: eurocoin on January 23, 2018, 01:13:03 PM
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4625/38955160985_97739ddb50.jpg)(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4742/25980683758_161709d769.jpg)

North Korea, 20 Won, 2004. Cercopjthecus Mitis instead of Cercopithecus mitis.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Big_M on May 20, 2018, 12:50:42 PM
East Caribbean States / E.C.C.B. 2012 - Carribean instead of Caribbean in the RM Diamond Jubilee series.

Apparently, the Royal Mint realised of this error quite late in the production process, and the coins are quite common. Please note that correct spelling coins were also minted. The spelling is correct on the second E.C.C.B. coin from the series, dated 2013.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: eurocoin on August 17, 2018, 03:33:30 PM
Just came across this one. Automobile historiques should be automobiles historiques. The other coins in the series are apparently correct.

(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1813/43372264814_73dd9af11c_n.jpg)(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1838/43372265244_1c9c12f143_n.jpg)

Congo, 10 Francs, 2002. Hispano Suiza H6 1919.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: eurocoin on March 01, 2019, 05:05:13 PM
(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7825/33372372478_72c4202316.jpg)

Cook Islands, 1 Dollar, 2019. Silver Star. Ounze instead of ounce.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: chrisild on March 02, 2019, 10:42:53 AM
Minted in Germany or Austria maybe? ;D In German we spell that word "Unze" ...

Christian
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: <k> on March 25, 2019, 10:05:49 AM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=6960.0;attach=89071;image)

Bahamas, 25 cents, 1972.

The correct spelling is "TWENTY-FIVE" - not "TWENTY FIVE", and certainly not "TWENTYFIVE", as seen on this coin.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: eurocoin on May 08, 2019, 02:03:12 PM
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/46886942025_2e01fc24d8_n.jpg)(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/32859902947_8ae50fe7a0_n.jpg)

Turkey, 20 and 50 Lira, 2011. European Youth Olympic Festival. Olimpic instead of olympic.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: chrisild on May 08, 2019, 08:07:57 PM
Cool find! Well, I guess the Turkish spelling sort of explains why such an error could be made. Then again, proofreading is not such a bad idea ...

Christian
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Oklahoman on December 28, 2019, 11:53:03 PM
EXPERIMENTAL is incorrectly spelled EXRERIMENTAL on some of the 1996 Faraday crowns of Isle of Man.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: eurocoin on January 25, 2020, 11:45:18 PM
'Firstever' on 50 and 500 Won coins of North Korea issued last year to commemorate the US-DPRK summit in Singapore.

(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=96816;image)
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: Figleaf on January 26, 2020, 07:25:53 AM
TFS! A hilarious piece. I love the dotted lines running to Glasgow and Brussels and Riga, but wonder just what they mean? Is it a Singapore Airlines route map, perhaps? Furthermore, I am grateful to hear that the North Korean and US delegations not just sat in the same room and stared at each other in disgust, but actually moved their jaws, making sounds. :laughing:

Peter
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: eurocoin on February 07, 2020, 07:50:10 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=97006;image)

Togo, 1,000 Francs CFA, 2004. Princess Kyniska. Travaie instead of Travail. Same error on coins commemorating Nike.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: eurocoin on June 26, 2020, 01:12:43 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=100512;image)

North Korea, 20 won, 2011. Artic bear instead of arctic bear.
Title: Re: Spelling and grammatical errors on coins
Post by: eurocoin on June 26, 2020, 02:25:38 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=100516;image) (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=100517;image)

Pitcairn Islands, 2 dollar, 2013. Anniversary of the coronation. Vareity instead of variety.
Correct version exists too.