World of Coins

Collecting coins => Coin collecting => Coin collecting accessories => Topic started by: Rangnath on April 29, 2007, 03:02:48 AM

Title: Weighing and scales
Post by: Rangnath on April 29, 2007, 03:02:48 AM
Any suggestions on what kind of scale I should get?  I definitely see the need for one!
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Figleaf on April 29, 2007, 07:14:10 PM
Quite right, Richie. A scale is not 100% protection, but no scale is putting yourself up for trouble. I use a pocket scale up to 0.1 gram. There are also scales up to 0.01 grammes. I know where they are sold here, not in the US. Maybe someone else can help you.

Incidentally, they are also useful when buying jewelry, e.g. in Mexico. If you know the price of silver and the weight of the jewelry, you can calculate what you are paying for the artistry. The jeweler may hate that, though.

Peter
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Figleaf on May 07, 2007, 08:31:29 PM
Rangnath, I can get mini scales for you (0.01 gram scales) @ $24.50 plus postage. See picture. Since we are trading already, we can include this in the trade also.

Peter
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Bimat on May 12, 2009, 03:50:56 PM
Since these are hammered coins,their weight should vary from coin to coin,even if they are of same denomination.Am I right?? And how these hammered coins are actually struck?

Aditya
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Figleaf on May 13, 2009, 02:10:08 AM
Partly right. Hammered Indian coins do vary in weight from one piece to another. Partly, this is due to production method, for another part it is due to having the same types for a long time, while inflation varies (inflation in this context is money getting cheaper in relation to goods, so the same quantity of rice must be bought with a larger number of coins, because every coin is struck lighter. Yet, coins are struck within weight bands.

Hammered coins of different denomination are sometimes struck with the same dies and at other times the denomination is off the flan or worn off. In such cases, the only way to determine the denomination is to know the weight. Since the weight bands are sometimes very close to each other, you need scales that give you a weight down to 1/10th of a gram. Kitchen scales are not precise enough.

A calliper is less important for determining the denomination, especially since most hammered coins are not round. However, diameter becomes important for coins that have spent a long time buried in the ground. It is not unusual for a low silver content coin to lose 50% of its weight, since copper solves much faster in polluted or overfertilized ground than silver. Such a light weight coin is not a fake. In such cases, a calliper will give you a better indication than scales.

In addition, scales and calliper are quite useful for identifying coins hammered according to European production methods and badly worn coins produced with the help of a reduction lathe. The denomination on such coins may be difficult to find or worn off. Spanish "cob" coins are a good example. Many would be impossible to identify without scales or a calliper.

Peter
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Bimat on May 13, 2009, 03:23:48 PM
Thanks for the clarification,Peter! :)
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: mumbapuri on December 23, 2009, 05:43:09 PM
where can i get a digi weighing machine and what cost? the one displayed looks very handy for coins.
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Abhay on December 23, 2009, 06:09:04 PM
where can i get a digi weighing machine and what cost? the one displayed looks very handy for coins.

Dear Mumbapuri,

These weighing scales are available with good hardware shops, particularly those selling weights and measures. I got this form Gwalior only for Rs. 1100.00. This is a chinese made scale, and can weigh upto 200 gms, with least count of .01 gram (10 mg).

Abhay
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: mumbapuri on December 24, 2009, 06:40:17 PM
thx abhay... will keep that price tag in mind... i never loose any opportunity to check the digi weights at the superstore to check their accuracy and min weighin capability with the pocket change.. one u displayed looks neat.
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Figleaf on September 05, 2010, 02:22:02 PM
Another thing every collector needs is callipers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Callipers). They were pretty handy before computers, to check for varieties, estimate clipping etc., but in the age of the computer, they are a must. While picture in catalogues are still real size, those on the net are mostly "as large as you can get away with." For an example, see this thread (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,7297.0.html). The first two coins are vastly different in size, yet they look about the same size. Therefore, when you upload a coin, it is always a good idea to state weight and diameter and when you ask for information or identification, it is vital to give weight and diameter.

Just about any callipers wil do, except those made of plastic. They bend under stress, so their readings are just plain wrong. If your eyesight leaves to be desired, go for an electronic version. It is even more precise than the mechanical thing and a quantum leap in ease of reading.

Peter
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Figleaf on September 05, 2010, 02:39:21 PM
And here's the third thing any collector needs: a small magnet. You wouldn't believe it if you are a extremist, but gold, silver and copper are all inconvenient coin metals and no longer used. Today, what's important is the price, colour (even after wear) and hardness of the metal. Modern cons use the products of modern metallurgy. Yet, among coin users there is always the feeling that if the coins would look like those in the "good" old days, other things would be better also, so there are still coins around in anachronistic metal compositions, like bronze.

The coins of the transition from traditional to modern metal compositions are often changing almost unnoticeably, by going from solid (e.g. bronze) to bronze coated coins. In addition, new amalgams may turn out cheaper and be a perfectly sensible solutions for coins that have become too expensive to make. A magnet may be just an easy way to distinguish the varieties or even to spot new varieties.

Any magnet will do. Personally, I use a refrigerator door magnet. I haven't found one with a coin on it yet (it would not be too difficult to make yourself), so a bottle of wine will have to do :) Just make sure you don't use your magnet too close to computer stuff.

Peter
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: andyg on September 05, 2010, 02:54:11 PM
Be careful with magnets, some magnets are more magnetic than others.

A coin collecting friend of mine was trying to save one of each type of the Italian wartime coins*, magnetic and non magnetic. I sent several specimens of magnetic coins only to be told that no, they weren't magntic, that was until he found a better magnet :)

*I don't know why Krause persists in marking these coins as different types, as they range from non magnetic through slightly magnetic to strongly magnetic depending on the mix of alloy.
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: sdchaugule on September 17, 2010, 05:13:21 AM
Dear Peter,
Thanks for your information of different instruments. I am using vernier caliper. Some times it is difficult to measure lions of Indian coins, especially one rupee. I intend to go for digital caliper.  Seeking your guidance whether digital caliper is more accurate and easy to handle, even detecting difference of 1mm. Further can you get me one and what would be method of my payment? I hope it is not inconvenient for you.
Regards,
sdchaugule 
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Figleaf on September 17, 2010, 08:25:26 AM
Digital callipers are quite precise, but only as precise as the coin is formed regularly. If it is not, a maximum and minimum diameter may be the best way to describe a coin. The maximum is easy: just turn the coin around in the calliper. The minimum must be found by trial and error, but that can be done also.

If you search with Google for digital calliper, you will find many offers. I am not sure if this page (http://dir.indiamart.com/impcat/digital-caliper.html) is useful for you, but I hope it is.

Peter
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Abhay on September 17, 2010, 10:48:45 AM
Dear Mr. Chaugule,

I think it should not be too difficult to get a Digital Calliper in the city you live. If you go to nay good Hardware or Weights shop, you should be able to get it. In India, mostly you will get Chinese made callipers, which should cost you about 1000 rupees for a 6 inch calliper. I am myself using a Chinese Calliper (Digital), which is good enough for coins.

If you need more accuracy, than I think MITOTOYO is the best calliper in Market (Japan made), but it should cost you about 6000-7000 rupees for 6 Inches calliper.

Abhay
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: sdchaugule on September 17, 2010, 02:36:24 PM
Peter and Abhay,
Thanks for the feedback.
Regards,
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: beekar on October 06, 2010, 10:52:13 AM
Abhay,
Nice handy weighing machine!!! How much does it cost?
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Abhay on October 06, 2010, 11:45:03 AM
This digital scale is Chinese made, and can weigh upto 200 Grams. It costs about Rs. 900 - 1000.

Abhay
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Prosit on January 20, 2011, 08:06:07 PM
I have never had a coin scale before so maybe I speant a little more than I had to but this is what I got.
($36 US counting shipping).

Dale
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Figleaf on January 20, 2011, 09:36:15 PM
Seems like a decent deal to me, Dale. Perfectly suitable for the job, small enough to carry around. Using AAA batteries has the disadvantage that your batteries are exhausted relatively quickly and the advantage that you can use re-loadable batteries.

Two hints. Take the batteries out when you are not going to use the machine for a length of time. It saves battery strength, but it also protect the machine from leaking batteries. Also, take it along when buying metallic jewelry. It is fun to see what you are paying for the metal and what for the work and the dealer's profit. I found that in Taxco (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taxco), the margin for work and profit was the smallest. In Japan, that margin was the largest by very far :-X

Peter
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Prosit on January 20, 2011, 11:43:31 PM
Oops!  I have been told they are out of that one.  So I substituted the image for the one I picked next. What was important to me was that it read to 0.01 grams.

Dale
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: MWM on May 20, 2011, 11:18:48 AM
Dear Abhay,
Thanks. I have this one. I was asking for something more powerful. Also what about weighing instruments? Do you ppl use it? Lot of ppl mention the weight in the discussion. Also what do you ppl use for measuring diameter or e.g. height of lion, or digits etc?

Manoj
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Abhay on May 20, 2011, 12:52:31 PM
For measuring, you can use a digital Vernier Calliper, which costs about Rs. 500-600. As far as weighing is concerned, just see this thread (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,5222.0.html), which shows the Weighing scale I am using.  This type of scale costs about 700-800 rupees.

Abhay
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: MWM on May 21, 2011, 06:25:56 AM
Dear Abhay,
I am intrested to buy both. Can you please send me the specification, make etc.
rgds
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Abhay on May 22, 2011, 04:52:33 PM
Dear Abhay,
I am intrested to buy both. Can you please send me the specification, make etc.
rgds

I am using the digital scale made by ACE, and I think this is chinese made. This can weigh upto 300 grams, with a least count of 0.01 gram. This costs about 800-900 rupees. This runs on 2 AAA size cells, and can show weight in Carats, grams or troy ounce. The model number is TP-300.

The vernier calliper that I am using is also Chinese made, and the name written is AEROSPACE. It can measure upto 150mm (or 6 inches). This runs on a single AG13 button cell. It can take measurements in millimeter or inches. This should cost about 700 rupees.

Abhay
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Prosit on May 22, 2011, 05:36:20 PM
I use a less expensive tool to measure than a digital caliper.
Works pretty good.

For weight, I use a HP-100X pocket scale.


Dale
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Rangnath on May 27, 2011, 04:17:06 AM
Scales are WONDERFUL! 
What type did you get?
richie
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: capnbirdseye on May 27, 2011, 04:31:13 PM
Scales are WONDERFUL! 
What type did you get?
richie

I got a new one off Ebay, it's not an expensive branded one but it's still 100% accurate but can be re-calibrated should the need arise., when I weighed some of our UK current coins it was spot on.  ;D

(http://i51.tinypic.com/24pz613.jpg)
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Kushi on October 19, 2013, 03:52:15 PM
Now it's 2013, two and a half years past the last post.

Can someone recommend a digital pocket scale that measures to a hundredth of a gram (0.01)? Brand name and approx. price?

Last month I purchased a Cen-Tech 1000 Gram Digital Scale (China) for about US$14. It works fine, but only measures to a tenth of a gram (0.1). What do other collectors/catalogers think of this accuracy? Enough?
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Figleaf on October 19, 2013, 03:59:45 PM
I think that accuracy is just fine. Go any lower and you'll be measuring how much dirt/wear your coin has.

My experience is that known brands are more expensive and the scales live just as long as those of unknown brands.

Peter
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: Coinsforever on October 20, 2013, 02:33:17 AM
Mostly all the digital scales do have re callibration option.
So as said by peter accuracy is no an issue.

However for more less weight measurements various scales of same brands are available.

Cheers ;D
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: JoeYuk on May 11, 2014, 06:37:12 PM
I had gifted a coin to an avid 1921 Morgan dollar collector.  It was a discovery piece of a new VAM so he was quite pleased.  The coin had no significant value but he appreciated it as an unattributed variety.   In return he sent me a tool used to identify clashed Morgan dollars.  It consists of two clear circular pieces of plastic connected in the center so they rotate independently.  An image of the obverse and reverse is attached.  While viewing the obverse the reverse shows thru to reveal where clash marks would be.  And vice versa.  Also it can be rotated to show what clash marks would appear in rotated dies.  I also included a pic of my micrometer and scale.
(http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j220/joeyuk/IMG_000clash1_zps809b6689.jpg)
(http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j220/joeyuk/clash2_zps0e9bcf2d.jpg)

(http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j220/joeyuk/micrometer_zps02ba0b13.jpg)


(http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j220/joeyuk/IMG_0012_zpsa14d91cf.jpg)
Title: Re: Weighing and scales
Post by: GSDykes on September 24, 2015, 08:16:09 AM
Here is a link (below) to view and print a free PDF file which I made. It is a handy chart of various coin alloys and their specific gravities. It also shows the S.G. of common elements as well as information on alloyed silver (Ag) coins. It is free to view, read, download and print (landscape format). Enjoy. Share.

www.Biblical-data.org/GSDykes_Specific_gravity_tests.pdf

Gary in Washington