World of Coins

Adjacent hobbies => Collecting banknotes => Other Asia => Topic started by: Asgorath on December 10, 2009, 06:30:13 AM

Title: North Korea 10 won banknote, 1978
Post by: Asgorath on December 10, 2009, 06:30:13 AM
Hi
what's the country of the banknote



(http://web.archive.org/web/20091225163608/http://img14.imageshack.us/img14/5763/nota2anv.jpg)


(http://web.archive.org/web/20091225102150/http://img51.imageshack.us/img51/9343/nota2rev.jpg)
Title: Re: What's the country of this banknote?
Post by: thelawnet on December 10, 2009, 07:35:27 AM
Looks Oriental, Communist (factories, star, etc.)

Candidates - Cambodia, China, North Korea, Laos, Vietnam, although most people would recognise that the language is not Chinese, so that leaves four candidates, assuming you lack even in a basic knowledge of Asian languages.

A google search for '10 1978 horse banknote' gives the answer.
Title: Re: What's the country of this banknote?
Post by: translateltd on December 10, 2009, 09:10:22 AM
I'm with "thelawnet".  While I could also answer this question, I'm not going to :-)

Repeat the mantra ... "Google is your friend"!

Title: Re: What's the country of this banknote?
Post by: Figleaf on December 10, 2009, 12:55:18 PM
Unfair, translateltd. You know the statue is on a coin. The script is Korean (Hangul) and the style of the note, the subject of the reverse, glorifying heavy (polluting) industry and the Russian style of the statue are enough to say that the note must be North Korean.

Peter
Title: Re: What's the country of this banknote?
Post by: chrisild on December 10, 2009, 01:39:57 PM
Unfair

 :)  While I can usually figure out Cyrillic characters, Asian ones I don't understand. OK, in many cases the design elements of a note (and, to a lesser extent, a coin) provide enough clues.

What I do not reply is posts (in some other forums; fortunately they hardly ever come up here) where somebody writes, hey, I have this coin that says Belgie, or Deutschland, or Helvetia, where is it from? Or when people from countries that hardly ever use digits themselves to indicate a coin's denomination show some piece that says cinco blablas and wonder what the face value could possibly be.

In those cases using one's preferred search engine probably takes less time than posting a forum message. Rant off - cases like this one are tougher from my POV, as there is no easy way for somebody who uses a "26 character" alphabet to enter the characters into GooBing. So I don't think there is anything wrong with the question - and if the answers go beyond a "that is a ten X note from Y" reply, even better ...

Christian
Title: Re: What's the country of this banknote?
Post by: translateltd on December 10, 2009, 08:28:54 PM
OK then, the Korean legend at the top reads as follows (there may be some variants in Romanisation):

Choson Minju Ju-eui Immin Gonghwaguk Jung-ang Eunhaeng

Literally: Korean Democratic People's Republic Central Bank

What's interesting for me from a language perspective is that each one of those Korean "letter blocks", while fully phonetic, represents an underlying Chinese character, and you could equally well represent those characters in Chinese, Japanese or Vietnamese, for instance, with not a vast amount of difference between them, in many cases traceable to an earlier stage of Chinese as they may contain final consonants (other than -n or -ng) that Chinese has since dropped.  In Japanese, for instance, the above string would come out as

Chosen Minshu Shugi Jimmin Kyoowakoku Chuuoo Ginkoo

I don't read Korean all that well, but since the writing system is phonetic, it's surprising how far you can get with a "Japanese soundtrack" running in the back of your mind, not that your average Korean likes to be reminded of the fact!

My Chinese is virtually non-existent so I can't represent the full string in that language in the same way, though I do know the Chinese for "bank" is read as "Yinhang", which can be seen mirrored in the Korean "Eunhaeng".



Title: Re: What's the country of this banknote?
Post by: Figleaf on December 10, 2009, 09:55:57 PM
It was only when I realized that yuan, won and yen are pronounced in virtually the same way that I looked up the characters and found they had something in common :)

Peter
Title: What's the country of this banknote?
Post by: Bimat on December 11, 2009, 03:43:46 PM
Very nice banknote,Asgorath. :)It's not an easy find.

Aditya
Title: Re: What's the country of this banknote?
Post by: asm on December 11, 2009, 03:56:43 PM
Aditya,
North korean notes would be exceedingly difficult to come by specially in India as it is a very closed economy. Besides this, as mentioned elsewere the notes have been demonetised 3 times since this note was issued.

BTW, is it not time to change the topic names of all these posts asking "What's the country of this banknote?" or similar so that references would be easier.

Amit

Title: What's the country of this banknote?
Post by: Bimat on December 11, 2009, 06:11:34 PM
Aditya,
North korean notes would be exceedingly difficult to come by specially in India as it is a very closed economy. Besides this, as mentioned elsewere the notes have been demonetised 3 times since this note was issued.

You are right,Amit.North Korean coins and banknotes are extremely difficult to find here in India.I like their FAO coins (denominated as 1/2 chon,struck in aluminum) a lot,but never got any.I have only one coin from that FAO series,which I got with the help of a Spanish friend.

Aditya
Title: Re: What's the country of this banknote?
Post by: translateltd on December 12, 2009, 07:23:12 PM

Rant off - cases like this one are tougher from my POV, as there is no easy way for somebody who uses a "26 character" alphabet to enter the characters into GooBing. So I don't think there is anything wrong with the question - and if the answers go beyond a "that is a ten X note from Y" reply, even better ...


Coming back to this, you'll see I said nothing about trying to enter Hangul letters into a search engine - that would be preposterous for anyone who doesn't know the language in the first place.  However, a Google search for

10 statue 1978 banknote

Brings up the following as the very first hit:

http://www.banknotes.com/kp20.htm

How hard is that?  It's amazing what you can find just by looking for descriptive elements plus bits of text (e.g. numbers, dates) that you *can* make out.  I'm always happy to help, but like to see that some efforts have been made first (teach a man to fish, and all that ...)



Title: Re: North Korea 10 won banknote, 1978
Post by: Figleaf on December 12, 2009, 08:52:39 PM
There is a fine line between asking questions and nagging, as any parents know; but we have only adults here. I am all in favour of asking questions. The answers may surprise and more questions may be answered than asked, which is useful by itself, I would say, as it draws the attention to further details. I am still learning from answers, even to questions others asked. Nevertheless, I would draw a line at submitting different denominations of the same series.

Peter