World of Coins

Research and reference => Numismatics => Topic started by: <k> on July 14, 2020, 05:17:23 PM

Title: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: <k> on July 14, 2020, 05:17:23 PM
I experienced such a system in the UK before 1971, when we had pounds, shillings and pence. We also had farthing, florins and crowns, but these were just names for coins of a particular denomination and were not official subunits.

In Malta before the euro, mils and cents were the subunits of the lira.
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: quaziright on July 14, 2020, 05:24:55 PM
I believe Jordan and Egypt have/had a mix of piastres, fils and Qirsh
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: chrisild on July 14, 2020, 05:31:49 PM
In Malta before the euro, mils and cents were the subunits of the lira.

Hmm, not quite. Malta had a "three-unit" setup until 1983; then the pound was replaced by a decimal lira (Lm 1 = 100 cents). And of course, if we go back in history, we could list many currency systems with two (maybe even more) sub-units. :)

Christian
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: <k> on July 14, 2020, 05:34:00 PM
So my dates were out with Malta. In 1986 Malta introduced a new coin series without mils.
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: <k> on July 14, 2020, 05:43:39 PM
According to Wikipedia:

The Egyptian pound is divided into 100 piastres or ersh, or 1,000 milliemes.

But does Egypt now use any coin lower than 1 piastre?
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: <k> on July 14, 2020, 05:45:44 PM
According to Wikipedia:

The Jordanian dinar is divided into 10 dirhams, 100 qirsh (also called piastres) or 1000 fulus.

I think 'fils' is more usual than fulus - for Europeans, anyway. What is currently the lowest denomination of coin in circulation in Jordan?
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: stef on July 14, 2020, 07:38:40 PM
Vietnam, before 1978, had 1 đồng = 10 hào, 1 hào = 10 xu. From 1978 only đồng and hào. With the inflation the hao disappeared from circulation but I don't know when.
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: <k> on July 14, 2020, 07:41:21 PM
Thank you, stef.
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: stef on July 14, 2020, 08:04:05 PM
The Libyan pound (1952-1971) also had qirsh (1/100) and millims (1/1000)
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: stef on July 14, 2020, 08:07:50 PM
Zaire - 1 zaïre = 100 makuta, 1 likuta = 100 sengi
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: stef on July 14, 2020, 08:13:03 PM
China - 1 圓 = 10 角, 1 角 = 10 分 (yuan, jiao, fen).
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: andyg on July 14, 2020, 08:16:07 PM
According to Wikipedia:

The Egyptian pound is divided into 100 piastres or ersh, or 1,000 milliemes.

But does Egypt now use any coin lower than 1 piastre?

Smallest coin is 50 Piastres, very rare to find any coins in change - lots of almost worthless banknotes though!
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: andyg on July 14, 2020, 08:19:51 PM
According to Wikipedia:

The Jordanian dinar is divided into 10 dirhams, 100 qirsh (also called piastres) or 1000 fulus.

I think 'fils' is more usual than fulus - for Europeans, anyway. What is currently the lowest denomination of coin in circulation in Jordan?

When I was there back in 2005, the smallest coin was a Piastre (there was a current ½ Piastre but that had fallen out of use even by then)
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: <k> on July 14, 2020, 08:26:29 PM
Thank you, all. I see andyg seemed to have a taste for hot sandy countries.
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: Henk on July 15, 2020, 09:28:34 AM
The US has 1$ = 10 dimes and 1 dime = 10 cents
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: Figleaf on July 15, 2020, 10:17:57 AM
Thought of that, but it is controversial. Disme (the spelling on the first types) may have the same root as the "decime" of the French revolution and be a denomination. However, it may also be a nickname, much like penny, nickel, quarter, 2 bits, and half are nicknames, even though they may refer to a British coin or Spanish peso/reales coins.

As a comfort, I offer that many US tax tokens are denominated in mils, so that in the end the US did have multiple sub-units.

Peter
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: chrisild on July 15, 2020, 10:25:10 AM
From what I know, the dime or disme is indeed a subunit of the US dollar. Then again, nobody really counts or calculates with it – people do not say "that'll be four dollars, six dimes and four cents". :) Now "nickel" and "penny" are actually nicknames ...

Christian
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: Henk on July 15, 2020, 10:37:49 AM
Whether used or not, the denomination DIME is prominantly stated on the coin.
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: <k> on July 15, 2020, 01:11:58 PM
In the UK in the 1960s, there were coins named farthing, florin and half crown. They were not regarded as true subunit names but names of coins. Similarly, the dime is not a true subunit. If it were, then the quarter would be denominated as 2½ dimes and the half dollar as 5 dimes.
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: chrisild on July 15, 2020, 03:54:19 PM
Initially the US currency had four, hmm, unit levels by law – the dollar was divided into ten di(s)mes, a dime was ten cents, and a cent was ten mills. The mil is gone, and I don't think anybody calculates with dimes (see my previous example). But keep in mind that a long time ago there were actually Half Dime (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/cc/NNC-US-1837-5C-Seated_Liberty_%28no_stars%29.jpg/800px-NNC-US-1837-5C-Seated_Liberty_%28no_stars%29.jpg) coins ...

Christian
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: <k> on July 15, 2020, 04:00:36 PM
I sse. Thank you for the historical lesson. So the 'ONE DIME' is a piece of historical residue.
Title: Re: Coin systems with more than one subunit
Post by: Henk on July 23, 2020, 08:41:16 PM
Belgium 2 Belgas (= 10 Francs) KM100 and 4 Belgas (= 20 Francs) KM101