World of Coins

Modern coins, pseudo coins and trade tokens of other continents => Central and South America => Topic started by: andyg on October 17, 2009, 05:11:00 PM

Title: South and Central America
Post by: andyg on October 17, 2009, 05:11:00 PM
OK, here's a brief tour of the currencies of South America.

Here's a map to get us started,
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 21, 2009, 01:44:32 AM
Argentina - Some older coins....

1) 1 Decimo 1823, from the State of Buenos Ayres, after the Spanish were repelled Argentina became a confederation of states, lacking in a central government, so each state had it's own coins.
2) 10 Centimos 1883.  Argentina was unified in 1862, however a new coinage was not introduced until 1881
3) 25 Pesos 1968, commemorating the 80th anniversary of the death of Domingo Faustino Sarmiento (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domingo_Faustino_Sarmiento).  The peso having steadily declined in value from the mid 1950's.
4) 100 Pesos 1979, centennial of the conquest of Patagonia commemorative.  In 1970 a new coinage was issued 100 old Pesos = 1 New Peso, but by 1979 the Peso was again worthless due to inflation.
5) 10 Pesos 1985, Building at Tucumen, a New Peso was introduced in 1983, the Peso Argentino.  This time 10,000 Peso Argentinos = 1 Old Peso.
6) 1000 Australes 1991, Another new coinage in 1985, this time 1000 Old Peso Argentinos = 1 New Australe.  This too was replaced, by the current coinage in 1992, at a rate of 10,000 Old Australes = 1 New Peso.

So one current Peso = 10,000,000,000,000 original pesos.
(seems my maths is right, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argentine_peso (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argentine_peso) 8))
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 21, 2009, 02:05:48 AM
Argentina - a modern type set.

1) 1 Centavo 1992, no longer used.
2) 5 Centavos 1993, radient sunface
3) 10 Centavos 1992, Argentine Coat of arms
4) 25 Centavos 1994, Towered building (where is the building?)
5) 50 Centavos 1994, Tucumen province capital building.
6) 1 Peso 1995, First Argentine coin

There were some commemoratives struck between 1996 and 2001 for circulation, but non since.
2 Peso coins I think are non-circulating.
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 21, 2009, 10:31:19 AM
Bolivia,

Some older coins,

1) ¼ Sol, 1852 of the pre-decimal coinage, first introduced by the Spanish, but renamed Sol from Real.
2) 5 Centavos 1883, struck in Paris, this issue was withdrawn from circulation due to confusion with silver 10 Centavos, it was then holed officially before it was re-issued.
3) 10 Centavos 1942, one of the few South American coins struck in Zinc.
4) 50 Centavos 1909, with the 'H' mintmark, of Ralph Heaton (Birmingham UK)
5) 10 Bolivars 1951, with a portrait of Simon Bolivar.
6) 25 Centavos 1972, of the new coinage the Peso Bolivano, introduced at a rate of 1 Peso Bolivano = 1000 Old Bolivanos.  Coins continued to be issued until 1980 when they ceased to keep up with inflation.
By 1986 there were 2.2 million Peso Bolivanos to the US$.
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 21, 2009, 10:45:40 AM
Bolivia, a modern type set.

In 1987 a new currency was introduced at a rate of 1,000,000 Old Peso Bolivanos to 1 New Bolivano.
So 1 New Bolivano = 1,000,000,000 original Bolivanos.

1) 2 Centavos 1987, now withdrawn.
2) 5 Centavos 1987, now withdrawn.
3) 10 Centavos 2001
4) 20 Centavos 1991
5) 50 Centavos 1997
6) 1 Bolivano 1991
7) 2 Bolivanos 1997
8 ) 5 Bolivanos 2001
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 21, 2009, 02:03:14 PM
Brazil, some older coins.

1) 500 Reis 1932, to commemorate the 400th anniversary of colonisation.
2) 2000 Reis 1939, with a portrait of Floriano Peixoto (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floriano_Peixoto)
3) 50 Centavos 1956, of the first decimal coinage introduced in 1942 100 Centavos = Cruzeiro
4) 500 Cruzeiros 1986, a second decimal coinage was introduced in 1967, inflation having rendered the old Cruzeiro worthless.  This time 100 Centavos = 1 Cruzeiro Novo, 1000 Old Cruzeiros = 1 Cruzeiro Novo.
5) 10 Cruzados 1988, yet another new coinage was introduced in 1986.  This time 100 Centavos = 1 Cruzado, 1000 Cruzeiro Novos = 1 New Cruzado.
6) 5000 Cruzeiros Reais 1994, Another decade, another coinage, this time 1000 old Cruzados = 1 Nova Cruzado (later changed to Cruzeiro), Cruzeiros Reais was introduced in 1993, so 5000 Cruzeiros Reais = 50,000 Cruzeiros.
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 21, 2009, 02:33:38 PM
Brazil, a modern type set.

The latest coinage was introduced in 1994 at an odd rate of 2750 old Cruzeiros Reais = 1 New Real.
So 2,750,000,000,000,000 Original Cruzeiros = 1 New Real.

1) 1 Centavo 1998, Pedro Álvares Cabral (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pedro_%C3%81lvares_Cabral) now no longer issued, but still current.
2) 5 Centavos 1998. Joaquim José da Silva Xavier, known as Tiradentes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joaquim_Jos%C3%A9_da_Silva_Xavier)
3) 10 Centavos 1998  Pedro I (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pedro_I_of_Brazil)
4) 25 Centavos 1998 Deodoro da Fonseca (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manuel_Deodoro_da_Fonseca)
5) 50 Centavos 2003 José Maria da Silva Paranhos Júnior, the Baron of Rio Branco  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bar%C3%A3o_do_Rio_Branco)
6) 1 Real 1999, Effigy of the Republic.

Some commemorative 1 Real's have been issued in recent years,
50th anniversary of the declaration of Human rights (1998), 100 years since the birth of Juscelino Kubitschek (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juscelino_Kubitschek) (2002) and 40th anniversary of the central bank (2005)
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 21, 2009, 03:58:51 PM
Chile, some older coins.

1) 1 Centavo 1835 (1/100 of a Peso)
2) 2 Reales 1844, 8 Reales = 1 Peso - the reales denominations were removed in 1851. 2 Reales became 25 Centavos.
3) 20 Centavos 1916.
4) 20 Centavos 1942
5) 50 Pesos 1974.  Inflation caused the old Peso to decline in value, in 1960 a new coinage was introduced of 100 Centesimos = 1 Escudo, 1000 old Pesos = 1 New Escudo.
6) 10 Centavos 1976, another new currency was introduced in 1976, this time 100 centavos = 1  Peso, 1000 old Escudos = 1 new Peso.
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 21, 2009, 04:16:35 PM
Chile, a modern type set.

1) 1 Peso 1995
2) 5 Pesos 1995
3) 10 Pesos 1995
4) 50 Pesos 1998 - the 1 to 50 Pesos have a portrait of Bernardo O'Higgins (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernardo_O%27Higgins)
5) 100 Pesos 2006, with a portrait of a Mapuche woman.
6) 500 Pesos 2000, with a portrait of Raúl Silva Henríquez (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raul_Silva_Henriquez)
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 21, 2009, 07:13:21 PM
Colombia, a few older coins.

1) 1¼ Centavos 1874
2) 2½ Centavos 1881
3) 1 Real 1852, equivalent to 10 Centavos, struck by the republic of 'Nueva Grenada'
4) 5 Pesos p/m 1909, or Peso paper money, printing press inflation caused the paper money to be worth than the silver coin, so this coin was equivalent to 5 Pesos in the paper standard.
5) 50 Centavos 1963, with a portrait of Simon Bolivar
6) 1000 Escudos 1997, one of the few occasions where a coin has been replaced by a banknote, due to high levels of counterfeiting, two other examples I can think of are Malaysia and Jordan.
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 21, 2009, 07:51:29 PM
Colombia, a modern type set.

1) 20 Pesos 2004, portrait of Simon Bolivar
2) 50 Pesos 1991
3) 100 Pesos 1994
4) 200 Pesos 1994, Quimbaya civilization figurine
5) 500 Pesos 1993, El arbol de Guacari (Guacari's tree)
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 21, 2009, 08:00:30 PM
Ecuador, some older coins

1) ½ Decimo (5 Centavos) 1886, with the mintmark 'HEATON BIRMINGHAM' in full.
2) 10 Centavos 1928, with a portrait of Simon Bolivar
3) 2 Decimos (20 Centavos) 1894, a portrait of Antonio José de Sucre (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonio_Jos%C3%A9_de_Sucre), struck in Lima, Peru.
4) 20 Centavos 1944, in Brass, struck in Denver USA
5) 2 Sucres 1973, Schön reports that these were not released to circulation and that all but 1035 were melted.
6) 1000 Sucres, one of Ecuador's final coins before adoption of the US$ commemorating 70 years of the central bank with a portrait of Eugenio Espejo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eugenio_Espejo)
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 21, 2009, 08:30:42 PM
Ecuador, a modern type set,

Introduced in 2000 when Ecuador adopted the US$, these correspond to the standard US types

1) 1 Centavo 2003, Map
2) 5 Centavos 2000, Juan Montalvo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juan_Montalvo)
3) 10 Centavos 2000, Eugenio Espejo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eugenio_Espejo)
4) 25 Centavos 2000, José Joaquín de Olmedo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jos%C3%A9_Joaqu%C3%ADn_de_Olmedo)
5) 50 Centavos 2000, José Eloy Alfaro Delgado (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eloy_Alfaro)

Ecuador is one of the few places where the Sacagawea (US dollar coin) actually circulates.
No coins have been issued since 2000 for 5c to 50c and 2003 for 1c, so it remains to be seen if these will be the last.
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 22, 2009, 12:52:56 AM
Falklands Isles...

A modern type set.
The first coinage for the islands was issued in 1974 and follows the British standard.
1) ½ Penny 1974, Atlantic Salmon, no longer valid.
2) 1 Penny 2004, Gentee Penguins
3) 2 Pence 2004, Upland Goose
4) 5 Pence 2004, Blackbrowned Albatross (reduced size from 1998)
5) 10 Pence 2004, Ursine Seal (reduced size from 1998)
6) 20 Pence 2004, Romney marsh Sheep
7) 50 Pence 2004, Falkland Isles Fox
8 ) 1 Pound 2004, Coat of Arms
9) 2 Pounds 2004, Map.

William Gardner (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,9030.0.html) designed the ½p, 1p, 2p, 5p, 10p, and 50p (as well as the UK 20p). He retired before he could design the Falklands 20p, so Robert Elderton (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,9464.0.html) designed that.

A commemorative 50p was issued in 2007 (see below) to commemorate the 25th anniversary of liberation, struck at the Pobjoy mint, it features the PM mintmark and die letters more usually associated with coins of the Isle of Man and Gibraltar.
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 22, 2009, 01:16:18 AM
French Guiana

Very few coins have ever been struck for French Guiana, as traditionally they used coins of the French standard, moving to the Euro in 2001.

1) 2 Sous, colony of Cayenne, struck in brass by the English in an attempt to undermine the currency.
2) 2 Sous, this time in Bronze.  I'm unsure if this is the genuine article! as contemporary forgeries far outnumber the real coins.
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 22, 2009, 01:28:19 AM
Guyana,

Some older coins,
1) 1/8 Gulder 1835 for the united colony of Demerary & Essequibo.
2) ¼ Gulder 1833.
3) 4 pence 1891, for British Guiana and West Indies, homeland UK types were also struck for Guiana, notably 2 pence of 1838, 1843, 1848 and four pence of 1888.
4) 4 Pence 1918, now just for British Guiana.
Between 1955 and 1967 East caribbean States  (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,4384.msg27440.html#msg27440)territory coinage was used.
5) 25 Cents 1988, of the Guyanese Dollar, introduced in 1967
6) 50 Cents 1967
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 22, 2009, 05:41:01 PM

Guyana, a modern type set.

In the early 90's inflation caught hold of the Guyanese Dollar, new coins were introduced in 1996.

1) 1 Dollar 1996, Rice Harvest, designed by Sean Thomas
2) 5 Dollars 1996, Sugar Cane, designed by Selwyn Cambridge
3) 10 Dollars 1996, Traditional gold mining, designed by Ignatious Adams
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 22, 2009, 11:55:23 PM
Paraguay, some older coins.

1) 1/12 Real 1845, Paraguays first coin, prior to this standard Bolivian coinage was in use.
2) 4 Centesimos 1870, with mintmark 'SHAW' who were contractors for Ralph Heaton.  Paraguay converted to the Peso in 1856, at a rate of 8 Reales = 1 Peso.
3) 1 Peso 1938, in Aluminium due to the steady decline in value of the Peso.
4) 10 Pesos 1939.
5) 15 Centesimos 1953, Paraguay changed it's currency in 1944 (1 New Guarani = 100 Old Pesos.)
6) 25 Centesimos 1953.

Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 23, 2009, 12:19:53 AM
Paraguay, a modern type set (part!)

1) 50 Guaranies 1992, Obv General José Félix Estigarribia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jos%C3%A9_F%C3%A9lix_Estigarribia).  Rev. Acaray Dam
2) 100 Guaranies 1996, Obv José E. Díaz (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jos%C3%A9_E._D%C3%ADaz) Rev. Humaitá (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humaitá#Geography)
3) 500 Guaranies 2007, Obv Bernardino Caballero Melgarejo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernardino_Caballero) Rev. National Bank Building
4) 1000 Guranies 2007, Obv Francisco Solano López Carrillo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francisco_Solano_L%C3%B3pez_(politician)) Rev. Panteon Nacional de los Heroes

The 50 Guaranies was changed to Aluminium in 2007, whilst the 100 Guaranies to Steel.  The picture below shows the previous brass versions.
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 23, 2009, 01:25:32 AM
Peru - some older coins,

1) ¼ Peso 1823, of the republican provisional issue during the war of independence.
2) ¼ Real 1855, the same specifications as the Bolivian issue, but minted in Lima.
3) 2 Reales 1837 from South Peru.  During the period of 1835-39 Peru and Bolivia formed a union, with Peru being divided into two states, North and South.  The confederation fell apart after defeat by Chile in 1839.
4) 20 Centavos 1919, with the date in words, Un Mil Novecientos Diecinueve.  Peru decimalised in 1858 with 100 Centavos = 1 Sol.
5) 500 Soles 1984, the sol now being worthless due to inflation.
6) 10 Centimos 1986.  A new coinage was introduced in 1985, 100 Centimos = 1 Inti. 1000 Old soles = 1 New Inti.
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 23, 2009, 10:54:00 AM
Peru, a modern type set.

Another new coinage was introduced in 1991, 100 Centimos = 1 New Sol, 1,000,000 old Inti = 1 New Sol.

1) 1 Centimo 2006
2) 5 Centimos 2007
3) 10 Centimos 2007
4) 20 Centimos 2008
5) 50 Centimos 2007
6) 1 Sol 2007
7) 2 Soles 2006, stylised bird in flight
8 ) 5 Soles 2006, stylised bird in flight.

The reverse was changed in 2001, the 50 centimos for example is quite different to the first type.
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 23, 2009, 11:11:02 AM
Suriname - a modern type set,

1) 1 Cent 1980
2) 5 Cents 1988
3) 10 Cents 1989
4) 25 Cents 1989
5) 100 Cents 1989
6) 250 Cents 1989

The Surinamese Guilder was hit by inflation in the early 1990's.  In 2004 they replaced the Guilder with a new currency the Surinamese Dollar at a rate of 1000 Old Guilders = 1 New Dollar.  No new coins were made, however the old coins became valid again so a ¼ Guilder became worth a ¼ Dollar.  New coins since 2004 have yet to appear outside mint sets. 
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 23, 2009, 11:48:29 AM
Uruguay, some older coins,

1) 4 Centesimos 1869, struck in Paris.
2) 10 Centesimos 1930, commemorating the Centennial of independence
3) 50 Centesimos 1917, with a portrait of Jose Artigas
4) 100 Pesos 1973, another South American currency hit by inflation.
5) 1 New Peso 1977, a new coinage was introduced at a rate of 1000 old pesos = 1 New Sol
6) 1 New Peso 1989, the Peso again beset by inflation.  This issue is quite scare as not all the mintage entered circulation.
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 23, 2009, 02:15:43 PM
Uruguay, a modern type set.

These were introduced in 1994, at a rate of 1000 (Old) New Pesos = 1 (New) Peso
1) 10 Centesimos 1994, no longer current
2) 20 Centesimos 1994, no longer current
3) 50 Centesimos 1998
4) 1 Peso 1994
5) 2 Pesos 1994
6) 5 Pesos 2003
7) 10 Pesos 2000

All have a portrait of José Gervasio Artigas. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jos%C3%A9_Gervasio_Artigas)
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 23, 2009, 04:09:27 PM
Venezuela, some older coins

1) 1 Centavo 1862, with the 'HEATON' mintmark on the truncation of the head.
2) 12½ Centavos 1896, of the new currency introduced in the same year 100 Centavos = 1 Bolivano
3) ¼ Bolivar 1919, no denomination is present on the silver Venezuela coins, instead they just had the weight, in this case 1.25 Grams.
4) ½ Bolivar 1936 or 2.5 Gr.
5) 1 Bolivar 1936 or 5 Grams.
6) 1000 Bolivars, the final coin before the new Bolivar was introduced in 2008.
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 23, 2009, 04:24:42 PM
Venezuela, a modern type set

The Bolivano was revalued in 2008 at a rate of 1000 old Bolivars = 1 Bolivar Fuerte ('Strong' Bolivar)

1) 1 Centavo 2007
2) 5 Centavos 2007
3) 10 Centavos 2007
4) 12½ Centavos 2007
5) 25 Centavos 2007
6) 50 Centavos 2007
7) 1 Bolivar Fuerte 2007

The 1 to 50 Centavos have the coat of arms on the reverse, the 1 Bolivar a portrait of Simón Bolívar. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_Bolivar)

The 12½ Centimos was introduced at the instigation of Hugo Chavez as some bizarre attempt at controlling inflation...
Title: Re: South America
Post by: andyg on October 23, 2009, 05:17:52 PM
And finally,

No study of coinage of the Americas is complete without mention of the Spanish colonial Real.
Used nearly all over the continent and produced at several mints.  The standard coin was the 8 Reales which in time became the model of most of the currencies in South America and is responsible for the odd denominations, 8 Reales became worth 1 Peso, so 2 Reales was 25 Centavos whilst 1 Real was 12½ Centavos (see Venezuela).  Half real became 6¼ Centavos which was used in Haiti. 
The Pillars of Hercules design on the 8 Reales is the source of the modern $ symbol.

Mints were as follows
G - Guatemala City (until 1776)
LM = Lima, Peru
M - Mexico City
NG - Nueva Guatemala (from 1777)
NR - Cartagena, Colombia
P, PN - Popayan, Colombia
PTS - Potosi, Bolivia
So - Santiago, Chile

1) ½ Real, crude, a 'cob', struck at Potosi (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,4609.msg28282.html#msg28282), Bolivia
2) ½ Real 1807, Charles IIII struck at Mexico
3) ½ Real 1812, Ferdinand VII struck at Santiago, with the portrait of Charles IIII but legend of Ferdinand VII as they didn't know what he looked like...
4) ½ Real 1821, Ferdinand VII struck at Mexico, with the portrait of Ferdinand VII.
5) 2 Reales 1797, struck at New Guatemala.
6) 8 Reales 1772, struck in Mexico, this particular example has the mintmasters initials 'FM' upside down.
Title: Central America
Post by: andyg on May 03, 2010, 12:43:21 AM
Here's a brief tour of the currencies of Central America.
Title: Re: Central America
Post by: andyg on May 03, 2010, 01:03:58 AM
Belize or British Honduras

Some older coins,

the first coins issued for British Honduras being cents in 1885 (1), prior to this Spanish coins were standard currency in this British colony.  From 1885 to 1894 the Guatemalan silver peso was the accepted currency, the bronze 1 cents being struck to compliment it.  In 1894 the colony switched to using the US$, the designs have remained relatively unchanged ever since (2-4 & 6)

1) 1 Cent 1888
2) 1 Cent, 1965
3) 5 Cents 1919
4) 5 Cents 1945
5) 25 Cents, 1985 FAO issue
6) 50 Cents 1907

British Honduras coins remain relatively hard to find, and regularly command values higher than those in catalogues.
Title: Re: Central America
Post by: andyg on May 03, 2010, 01:04:51 AM
Belize - Franklin Mint Issues

Throughout the 70's and early 80's the Franklin Mint made special collector versions of circulating currencies, all were non-circulating, with one exception - Belize.
I do not know why this is so, the 5 and 25 cent below have definitely been worn in circulation.

The designer was Michael Rizzello (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,9511.0.html).

1) 1 Cent 1974, Swallow tailed kite
2) 5 Cents 1977, Fork tailed flycatcher
3) 10 Cents 1974, Long tailed hermit bird
4) 25 Cents 1975, Blue crowned motmot
5) 50 Cents 1974, Magnificent Frigate bird
Title: Re: Central America
Post by: andyg on May 03, 2010, 01:06:32 AM
Belize - A modern type set.

Still with the basic designs of 1894, British Honduras became Belize in 1973, the 1 Cent first reduced in size, then became Aluminium along with the 5 cent in 1976.  The 1$ was first struck in 1990 and uses the Maklauf portrait for Elizabeth II rather than the somewhat older Gillick portrait.

1) 1 Cent 1991
2) 5 Cents 1991
3) 10 Cents 2000
4) 25 Cents 1993
5) 50 Cents 1991
6) 1 Dollar 2003

The $1 reverse shows Columbus's fleet by designer Robert Elderton (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,9464.0.html).
Title: Re: Central America
Post by: andyg on May 03, 2010, 01:28:39 AM
Costa Rica, some older coins.

1) 5 Centavos and 2) 25 Centavos of the first decimal coinage, 100 Centavos = 1 Peso.
The 25 Centavos has an unusual mintmark 'HEATON BIRMm' rather than the standard H.
The Colon (=100 Centimos) replaced the Peso in 1896 at par.
3) 2 Centimos 1903
4) 5 Centavos 1919, although called Centavos it's value was as the Centimos issues.
5) 50 Centimos 1923, counterstamped over an earlier 25 Centavos, due to a rise in the value of silver.
6) 25 Centimos 1982, a modern version, much debased and now in Aluminium.
Title: Re: Central America
Post by: andyg on May 03, 2010, 01:29:12 AM
Costa Rica, a modern type set

1) 1 Colon 1998, no longer used
2) 5 Colones 2005
3) 10 Colones 2005
4) 25 Colones 1995
5) 50 Colones 1997
6) 100 Colones 1997
7) 500 Colones 2000, commemorative issue (struck for circulation), the latest 500 Colones is similar to the others in the series.
Title: Re: Central America
Post by: andyg on May 03, 2010, 01:41:28 AM
El Salvador, some older coins.

The first decimal coinage was introduced in 1889 with 100 Centavos = 1 Peso, in 1920 the Colon (=100 Centavos) replaced the Peso at par, thus enabling the smaller denominations to continue to be issued without a design change.

1) 1 Centavo, 1913, Struck by Ralph Heaton, Birmingham
2) 5 Centavos, 1991
3) 50 Centavos, 1953
4) 1 Peso, 1914
5) 1 Colon, 1985 struck in Mixico city
6) 1 Colon, 1988

The smaller denominations (1ct to 25ct) featured a portrait of Francisco Morazan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francisco_Moraz%C3%A1n)
The 50 cents had Jose Matias Delgado (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jose_Matias_Delgado)
and the 1 Peso / 1 Colon a portrait of Christopher Columbus.

Sadly there is no modern El Salvador set, the country adopted the US$ in 2004.
Title: Re: Central America
Post by: andyg on May 03, 2010, 01:42:16 AM
Guatemala, some older coins.

Guatemala used the inherited Spanish Peso system until 1925, several attempts for decimalisation were made in 1869, 1870 and 1881 but each failed.

1) 1 Centavo, 1/100 of a Peso from the second attempt of decimalistion.
2) ¼ Real 1890
3) 2 Reales 1873, featuring the date '15 de Sept de 1821', Guatemala's declaration of independence.
4) 50 Centavos 1922 provisional issue, due to a shortage of silver coin.
5) ½ Centavo 1932, with the coat of arms.
6) 25 Centavos 1943, with the then newly built Palacio National de Guatemala (struck in Philadelphia USA)
Title: Re: Central America
Post by: andyg on May 03, 2010, 01:42:55 AM
Guatemala, a modern type set

1) 1 Centavo, 1999, Fray Bartolome de las Casas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fray_Bartolome_de_las_Casas)
2) 5 Centavos 2006, Silk cotton tree, with legend Libre Crezca Fecundo ("Grow free and fertile")
3) 10 Centavos 2006, Monolito de Quirigua (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quirigu%C3%A1)
4) 25 Centavos 1991, Woman in native dress
5) 50 Centavos, 1999,  Monja Blanca (White Nun) National flower (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monja_Blanca)
6) 1 Quetzal 2001, "PAZ" = Peace, above stylised dove
Title: Re: Central America
Post by: andyg on May 03, 2010, 01:45:52 AM
Honduras, some older coins

1) ¼ Real, 1869 produced in Paris of the predecimal series, the first decimal coins being issued in 1879.
2) 1 Centavo, 1907 struck using dies intended for 10 Centavos, the '10' being crudely altered to read 'UN'
3) 1 Centavo 1919
4) 2 Centavos 1920
5) 50 Centavos 1994, FAO commemorative issue
6) 1 Lempira 1937, of the reformed coinage of 1931
Title: Re: Central America
Post by: andyg on May 03, 2010, 01:46:28 AM
Honduras, a modern type set

1) 5 Centavos 1993
2) 10 Centavos 1976
3) 20 Centavos 1993
4) 50 Centavos 1978

1, 2 and 5 Centavos are no longer used due to their small value, prices being rounded to the nearest 10 Centavos.  A new series of coins of 50 Centavos and 1,2,5 and 10 Lempiras are apparently planned.

The 20 and 50 Centavos feature Chief Lempira  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lempira_(Lenca_ruler)) who led resistance against the Spanish in the 1530's.
Title: Re: Central America
Post by: andyg on May 03, 2010, 11:28:04 AM
Nicaragua, Some old coins....

1) 5 Centavos, 1899 of the first decimal coinage (100 centavos = 1 Peso)
2) 20 Centavos, 1887 with the 'H' mintmark of Ralph Heaton & Co. (Birmingham UK)
3) 1 Centavo, 1943 of the new coinage first issued in 1912, 100 Centavos = 1 Cordoba, named after Francisco Hernández de Córdoba (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francisco_Hern%C3%A1ndez_de_C%C3%B3rdoba_(founder_of_Nicaragua))
4) 5 Cordobas, featuring Augusto César Sandino (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Augusto_C%C3%A9sar_Sandino) and his hat.
5) 500 Cordobas, of the much devalued cordoba, but still with the hat.
6) 50 Centavos of 1987. (I'm unsure if this was issued before the 500 Cordobas, or as one of the first coins of a newly revalued Cordoba in 1987)
Title: Re: Central America
Post by: andyg on May 03, 2010, 11:29:39 AM
Nicaragua, A modern type set.

1) 5 Centavos 2002
2) 10 Centavos 2007
3) 25 Centavos 2002
4) 50 Centavos 1997
5) 1 Cordoba 2002
6) 5 Cordobas 1997
7) 10 Cordobas 2007, featuring the Statue of Andres Castro
Title: Re: Central America
Post by: andyg on May 03, 2010, 11:30:23 AM
Panama, Some older coins....

1) ½ Centesimo 1907
2) 2½ Centesimos, 1904 one of the smallest milled coins ever issued, being just 1¼ grams in weight.
3) 2½ Centavos 1929
4) 25 Centavos 1904, when the Panamanian coinage was introduced in 1904 it was equivalent in value to the US$, though it's coins had twice the silver content.
5) ¼ Balboa, 1953 issued after the reform of 1930 which changed the Panamian coins into US standard.
The issues of 1953 were commemorative, celebrating 50 years of the republic.
6) 1 Balboa 1947
Title: Re: Central America
Post by: andyg on May 03, 2010, 11:31:36 AM
Panama, a modern type set.

1) 1 Centesimo with a portrait of Urraca (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urrac%C3%A1)
2) 5 Centesimos with a portrait of Sara Soullo
3) 1/10 Balboa with a portrait of Vasco Núñez de Balboa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasco_N%C3%BA%C3%B1ez_de_Balboa)
4) ¼ Balboa, with a portrait of Vasco Núñez de Balboa

25 Centesimos have undergone a few design changes in recent years, the 2003 issue had a Tower, 2005 had a bridge, 2008 50th anniversary of Children's hosiptal and also Protegete Mujer (?) commemorative.  2009 sees a 50 cent comemorating the National bank centennial.
These all follow the standard US$ coin types.  There is also a modern ½ Balboa, of similar style to the 1/10 Balboa.