World of Coins

Modern coins, pseudo coins and trade tokens of other continents => Pacific Islands => Topic started by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 09:19:08 PM

Title: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 09:19:08 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=86258;image)

The Cook Islands



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=4370.0;attach=72583;image)

Australasia and the Pacific Islands



From Wikipedia:

The Cook Islands is a self-governing island country in the South Pacific Ocean, in free association with New Zealand. It has a population of around 17000. It comprises 15 islands whose total land area is 240 square kilometres (92.7 sq mi). The Cook Islands' Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) covers 1,800,000 square kilometres (690,000 sq mi) of ocean. Rarotonga is capital and also the largest of the Cook Islands, with Avarua as its the main commercial and administrative centre. 

New Zealand is responsible for the Cook Islands' defence and foreign affairs, but they are exercised in consultation with the Cook Islands. In recent times, the Cook Islands have adopted an increasingly independent foreign policy. Although Cook Islanders are citizens of New Zealand, they have the status of Cook Islands nationals, which is not given to other New Zealand citizens.

The Cook Islands' main population centres are on the island of Rarotonga (10,572 in 2011), where there is an international airport. There is a larger population of Cook Islanders in New Zealand itself; in the 2013 census, 61,839 people said they were Cook Islanders, or of Cook Islands descent. Tourism is the country's main industry, followed by offshore banking, pearls, and marine and fruit exports.

The languages of the Cook Islands include English, Cook Islands Māori, also known as "Rarotongan," and Pukapukan.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 09:21:22 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=86260;image)

Coat of arms



From Wikipedia:

The coat of arms of the Cook Islands has a shield as its focal point. The shield is blue with fifteen white stars arranged in a circle, as found on the national flag, and is supported by a flying fish (maroro) and a white tern (kakaia). The helmet is an ariki head-dress (pare kura) of red feathers, symbolising the importance of the traditional rank system, and the name of the nation is on a scroll below the shield. The achievement is augmented by a cross and a Rarotongan club (momore taringavaru) used by orators during traditional discourses, respectively symbolizing Christianity and the richness of Cook Islands' tradition, placed in saltire behind the shield.

The coat of arms was designed by Papa Motu Kora, a mataiapo, a traditional chiefly title from the village of Matavera in Rarotonga.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 09:27:44 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=86259;image)

The flag of the Cook Islands



From Wikipedia:

The flag of the Cook Islands, officially known as the Cook Islands Ensign, is based on the traditional design for former British colonies in the Pacific region. It is a blue ensign containing the Union Flag in the upper left, and on the right, fifteen stars in a ring. The Union Flag is symbolic of the nation's historic ties to the United Kingdom and to the Commonwealth of Nations. The stars stand for the fifteen islands that make up the Cook Islands (Tongareva, Rakahanga, Manihiki, Pukapuka, Nassau, Suwarrow, Palmerston, Aitutaki, Manuae, Takutea, Atiu, Mitiaro, Mauke, Rarotonga and Mangaia). The blue represents the ocean and the peaceful nature of the inhabitants.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 09:32:45 PM
From Wikipedia:

The Cook Islands became a British protectorate in 1888, due largely to community fears that France might occupy the territory, as it had Tahiti. On 6 September 1900, the leading islanders presented a petition asking that the islands (including Niue "if possible") should be annexed as British territory. On 8–9 October 1900 seven instruments of cession of Rarotonga and other islands were signed by their chiefs and people; and by a British Proclamation issued at the same time the cessions were accepted, the islands being declared parts of Her Britannic Majesty's dominions.

These instruments did not include Aitutaki. It appears that, though the inhabitants regarded themselves as British subjects, the Crown's title was uncertain, and the island was formally annexed by Proclamation dated 9 October 1900. The islands were included within the boundaries of the Colony of New Zealand in 1901 by Order in Council under the Colonial Boundaries Act, 1895 of the United Kingdom.  The boundary change became effective on 11 June 1901, and the Cook Islands have had a formal relationship with New Zealand ever since.

When the British Nationality and New Zealand Citizenship Act 1948 came into effect on 1 January 1949, Cook Islanders who were British subjects gained New Zealand citizenship. The country remained a New Zealand dependent territory until 1965, when the New Zealand Government decided to offer self-governing status to its colony. In that year, Albert Henry of the Cook Islands Party was elected as the first Premier.

The Realm of New Zealand, one of 16 Commonwealth realms, is the entire area over which the Queen of New Zealand is sovereign, and comprises New Zealand, Tokelau, the Ross Dependency, the Cook Islands and Niue. The Cook Islands and Niue are self-governing states in free association with New Zealand. The New Zealand Parliament cannot pass legislation for these countries, but with their consent can act on behalf of them in foreign affairs and defence. Tokelau is a non-self-governing territory, but is administered by a council of three elders (one from each Tokelauan atoll). The Ross Dependency is New Zealand's territorial claim in Antarctica, where it operates the Scott Base research facility. New Zealand nationality law treats all parts of the realm equally, so most people born in New Zealand, the Cook Islands, Niue, Tokelau and the Ross Dependency are New Zealand citizens.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 09:35:52 PM
From Wikipedia:

The dollar is the currency of the Cook Islands. The dollar is subdivided into 100 cents, although some 50 cent coins carry the denomination as "50 tene".

Until 1967, the New Zealand pound was used on the Cook Islands, when it was replaced by the New Zealand dollar. In 1972, coins were issued specifically for the Cook Islands, with banknotes appearing in 1987. The Cook Islands dollar is pegged at par to the New Zealand dollar. The currency of New Zealand and the Cook Islands circulate concurrently within the country.

In 1972, bronze 1 and 2 cents, and cupro-nickel 5-, 10-, 20- and 50-cents, and 1-dollar coins were introduced. All were the same size, weight, and composition as the corresponding New Zealand coins, however, the unique crown-sized dollar coin circulated much more readily than its New Zealand equal. Each coin depicted plants, animals, and items unique to the Cook Islands.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 09:37:03 PM
The common obverse of the first coins featured the standard Arnold Machin portrait of Queen Elizabeth II.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 09:43:33 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=13862.0;attach=81058;image)

1 cent.  Taro leaf.



The reverse designs of the first coinage were the work of James Berry (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,9473.0.html), who had designed the reverses of New Zealand's first decimal coins. His initials appeared on all the coins.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 09:51:13 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=23375.0;attach=86263;image)

2 cents.  Pineapples.



The coins were minted at various times both by the Royal Mint (UK) and the Franklin Mint. Here you can see the small "f" that was the Franklin's mint mark.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 09:55:41 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=13166.0;attach=86264;image)

5 cents.  A hibiscus flower.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 09:57:40 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=23385.0;attach=80911;image)

10 cents.  Oranges.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 09:59:06 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=23679.0;attach=75187;image)

20 cents.  Fairy lake swallow.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 10:01:09 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=10915.0;attach=80858;image)

20 cents.  Pacific triton shells.



This is an attractive alternative design that I believe was issued only in Franklin Mint's proof sets.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 10:02:31 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=4024.0;attach=75185;image)

50 cents.  Bonito fish.  Cybiosarda elegans.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 10:03:43 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=4024.0;attach=60202;image)

50 cents, 1973.  FAO version.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 10:08:31 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=4018.0;attach=77304;image)

50 cents.  Tangaroa, the Cook Islanders' God of Creation.



Tangaroa is hermaphroditic: notice also the pregnant belly. James Berry first produced a sketch of a full-frontal Tangaroa - but with nothing between the legs. The Cook Islanders were not at all pleased when they saw the initial sketch, and they promptly ordered Berry to include the missing organ.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 10:16:24 PM
The Cook Islands adopted Raphael Maklouf's portrait of the Queen in 1987.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 10:37:18 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=4018.0;attach=75199;image)

A scalloped $1 coin of 1987, featuring the god Tangaroa.



From Wikipedia:

In 1983 production of the 1 and 2-cents coins was ceased, and the two coins were later demonetized.

In 1987 a smaller, lighter scallop-edged $1 coin with a similar size and shape to the Hong Kong $2 piece. This coin was issued to replace its bulky predecessor. Along with the new dollar, a triangular $2 coin and a dodecagonal (twelve-sided) $5 piece in equal size and shape to the Australian 50-cents coin were introduced, with the new $1 and $2 composed of cupro-nickel and the $5 coin in aluminium bronze.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 10:38:40 PM
The reverse design of the $2 coin featured "Kumete", traditionally used to pound root foods, such as arrowroot from the islands of Atiu.

The reverse designs of the circulation $2 and $5 coins were the work of Horst Hahne (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,8865.0.html) of the Royal Australian Mint. His initials were included on the designs.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 10:39:45 PM
The reverse design of the $5 coin featured a Pacific triton seashell.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 10:52:55 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=2194.0;attach=72087;image)

50 tene, 1988.  Turtle.
.



In 1988 a new design was introduced for the 50 cents coin, whose denomination was now shown in the local language as "50 TENE".

This design was also by Horst Hahne, and it continued to co-circulate with the previous design, which in fact continued to be minted until 1992.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 11:03:14 PM
Until 1995 the Cook Islands ran a currency board, with the New Zealand dollar as the anchor currency. This means that the Cook Islands currency was not fully independent, being backed by the New Zealand dollar. It produced its own coins and banknotes, but in 1994 the New Zealand banks refused to accept Cook Islands notes, as they were no longer fully backed 100% by New Zealand currency. The Cook Islands dollar was worth only around 95 New Zealand cents by 1995.

The Cook Islands continued to use New Zealand currency, however, but after 1994 it stopped issuing its own coins and notes for many years. The Cook Islands $5 coin continued to circulate, since it was not matched by any New Zealand  coin denomination, NZ$5 notes also co-circulated. With the reduction in size of New Zealand's 10, 20 and 50-cents coins in 2006, older cent coins began to be phased out in both countries.

Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 11:10:04 PM
In 2010 the Cook Islands issued a collector set of coins that looked like a circulation set. In fact, they never circulated and were never intended to do so. They were sold simply in order to earn money from collectors. Their designs looked typical of fantasy pieces, and this led some people to suspect that they were indeed unofficial issues.

Eventually our forum member eurocoin contacted the Cook Islands authorities, who confirmed that they were an official issue but did not circulate. See: Cook Islands: Series of coins 2010 (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,6279.0.html).
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 11:14:15 PM
In March 2015, Radio New Zealand reported the following news:

The minting of new Cook Islands coins will begin this week in commemoration of 50 years of independence for the country.

The Finance Minister Mark Brown will visit the Royal Australian Mint in Canberra to see the first coin go into production, ready for circulation in August. He says the New Zealand coins currently being used in the Cook Islands will be phased out.

Mr Brown says the new coins will be the same sizes as the New Zealand 10 cent, 20 cent and 50 cent coins, the one and two dollar coins will be changed, while a five dollar coin will be launched. He says the new coins will save the government money.

"In the first year we will make over a million dollars in additional revenue from the coins. Because currently we are buying the New Zealand coins at face value, and then on top of that, paying the cost of freighting them here. But by using our own coins we are only paying for the cost price of our coins which are a faction of the face value. So automatically we are ahead there."
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 11:15:32 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=31133.0;attach=61082;image)

Cook Island coins of 2015.



In August 2015 the Cook Islands issued its own coinage once more, after a gap of many years. Like the modern New Zealand set, the series was smaller and lighter than before, and the 10 cents coin was its lowest denomination. Designs from the previous series were used, including the hermaphroditic god of creation Tangaroa, who clutches a pregnant belly. However, a superb new design for the new 5 dollar coin featured a vaka or catamaran, while the Southern Cross constellation dominates the night sky. The design was created by Aaron Baggio of the Royal Australian Mint.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 11:17:06 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=31133.0;attach=54675;image)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=31133.0;attach=54676;image)

A closer look at the $5 coin.
Title: Re: Coinage of the Cook Islands
Post by: <k> on November 12, 2018, 11:19:11 PM
That is the story so far.